Genomic selection for sheep and beef systems, dispelling the myths for farmers. Dewi Jones January 2016

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1 Genomic selection for sheep and beef systems, dispelling the myths for farmers Dewi Jones January 2016

2 First things first Selective culling

3 Selective culling

4 First things first Selective culling Performance recording

5 Recording Performance

6 First things first Selective culling Performance recording Genetic tests

7 Genetic tests SINGLE gene effect Scrapie (PrP) Spider lamb disease Coat colour Horns MAJOR genes with large effect on traits MyoMAX Inverdale Booroola Double Muscling Ingenity panel MANY genes with small effect Most economically important traits Growth Muscling Fertility Prolificacy Milk production Longevity

8 DNA Parentage Assignment Accurate recording of pedigree may be difficult in a commercial environment: Multiple Sire Mating Outdoor Lambing DNA-Marker technology can give accurate pedigree assignment. Innovis currently record over 2,000 lambs/annum with this technology

9 The Genomic Revolution Map of cattle genome first published in 2009 Map of sheep genome published in 2014 Approx million DNA variants per species identified SNP chips available that identify of these variants

10 Conventional Selection Performance Measure Performance Genetic Relationships Estimated Breeding Value (EBV) Time Conventional selection

11 Performance Genomic selection Measure Performance Genomic Data Genomic Breeding Value (GBV) Time Conventional selection Genomic selection Genetic Relationships

12 GENOMIC SELECTION Measure performance Genotype Training Develop genomic prediction Progeny Genotype Identify animals with best genes Progeny Genotype Identify animals with best genes

13 Genomic selection will mean... Our selection decisions are: more timely more accurate more cost effective

14 Genomic Selection will do away with the need for recording Good records are needed to establish relationships between DNA variants and performance Reference populations still required

15 Once we have established the relationship between genotype and phenotype we can give up recording altogether The relationship between genotype and phenotype is likely to change over time We will need to continue recording some animals in the population

16 Genomic Selection will completely replace more traditional selection Benefit small for: Easily measured traits Traits of moderate-high heritability Benefit greater for: Hard to measure traits Traits requiring lifetime performance Sex limited traits

17 We can piggy back on the work other breeds put in to establish the reference populations The way DNA variants are combined on the genome is unique to each breed Relationships established for one breed population may NOT hold in other populations

18 Genomic selection will allow us target commercially important traits Carcase and meat traits are one area where genomic selection can be really useful Limousin/SRUC/ABP initiative

19 Genomic selection will allow us target commercially important traits Innovis Abermax and Abervale meat rams Focus Prime meat rams

20 Genomic selection helps us to improve maternal traits Offers solutions where traits are only expressed in one sex Examples Innovis Aberfield and Aberdale (4 th year) Lleyn/Cardiff University (starting now)

21 Genomic selection will allow us to improve traits that are difficult to measure Offers most potential for difficult to measure traits Texel Sheep Society and SRUC project to develop genomic breeding values for susceptibility to mastitis Stabiliser cattle Net feed efficiency

22 Genomic selection will allow us to select animals at a very young age Allows more accurate identification of potential breeding stock at a young age Lambs at 4 weeks old using current parentage assignment

23 Genomic selection will increase inbreeding Used wisely genomic information can be used to improve our management of inbreeding

24 IN SUMMARY Genomic selection is a powerful tool for genetic gain Training the genome with performance and pedigree is essential, but expensive ( 1.4M) Genomic breeding values will be part of our future but there are other more cost effective options in the short term

25 Thank you for listening