Slide 1 / All of Earth's water, land, and atmosphere within which life exists is known as a. Population Community Biome Biosphere

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1 Slide 1 / 40 1 ll of Earth's water, land, and atmosphere within which life exists is known as a Population ommunity iome iosphere

2 Slide 2 / 40 2 ll the plants, animals, fungi living in a pond make up a Population ommunity iome iosphere

3 Slide 3 / 40 3 tree requires light, moisture, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and minerals to survive. This demonstrates that a living organism depends upon iotic factors biotic factors Symbiotic relationships ompetition

4 Slide 4 / 40 4 Which of the following is a biotic factor in an ecosystem? The amount of oxygen in the atmosphere The climate of the region The amount of annual precipitation The types of carnivores

5 Slide 5 / 40 5 Which pair of organisms would most likely compete for the same ecological niche? acteria and fungi eer and wolf Tree and fungi eer and bacteria

6 Slide 6 / 40 6 Which of the following is an example of mutualism? tick living on the scalp of a human Nitrogen fixing bacteria living in the roots of legumes barnacle living on a whale wolf preying on cattle

7 Slide 7 / 40 7 Which statement best describes the relationship between organism X and organism Y in each interaction above? Organism X is positively affected by the relationship and organism Y is negatively affected. Organism X is negatively affected by the relationship and organism Y is positively affected. oth organisms are positively affected by the relationship. oth organisms are negatively affected by the relationship.

8 Slide 8 / 40 8 Which set of terms best identifies the letters in the above diagram? Photosynthesis, inorganic molecules, decomposition Respiration, organic molecules, digestion Photosynthesis, organic molecules, respiration Respiration, inorganic molecules, photosynthesis

9 Slide 9 / 40 9 utotrophs convert radiant energy into Lipids Proteins arbohydrates Nucleic acids

10 Slide 10 / In the diagram above, which type of organism is most likely represented by letter X? ecomposer Producer utotroph Herbivore

11 Slide 11 / Which of the following organisms would most likely be dependent upon other animals for food? Primary consumers Herbivores Scavengers Producers

12 Slide 12 / In the above food web Minnows and fish are primary consumers lgae is a decomposer Fish and ducks are secondary consumers quatic crustaceans are omnivores

13 Slide 13 / scorpion stalks, kills, and then eats a spider. ased on its behavior, which ecological terms describe the scorpion? Producer, herbivore, decomposer Producer, carnivore, heterotroph Predator, autotroph, herbivore Predator, carnivore, consumer

14 Slide 14 / Removing all predators from an ecosystem would most likely result in n increase in the number of higher order consumers decrease in the number of new predators moving n increase in the amount of organic waste generated n increase in the number of herbivores

15 Slide 15 / Which type of information is represented in the above diagram? The processes of respiration and photosynthesis Transpiration and condensation within the water cycle ecomposers releasing a material that is acted on by other organisms Interactions between predators and prey

16 Slide 16 / ll of the following are recycled in the biosphere EXEPT Water Phosphorous Nitrogen Energy

17 Slide 17 / How is carbon stored in the biosphere? In the atmosphere as carbon dioxide Underground as fossil fuels and calcium carbonate rock In plant and animal tissues ll of the above

18 Slide 18 / The repeated movement of water between Earth s surface and the atmosphere is called The water cycle The condensation cycle Evaporation Precipitation

19 Slide 19 / Nitrogen fixation is carried out primarily by acteria Fungi Plants Soil

20 Slide 20 / rocky island appears as ocean waters recede. Which forms of vegetation would likely appear first on the bare rock? Lichens Weeds Shrubs Trees

21 Slide 21 / The diagram above is an example of? Primary ecological succession Secondary ecological succession iological progression ommunity interactions

22 Slide 22 / The changes in the diagram above will most likely lead to stable ecosystem that will last for many years Loss of heterotrophs that cannot be recovered Long-term rise of temperature Increased production of carbon dioxide

23 Slide 23 / biome is characterized by its particular set of abiotic factors and verage temperatures and precipitation Specific geographic location istance from the equator haracteristic ecological community

24 Slide 24 / iomes near the equator tend to Have warm average temperatures with little seasonal variation Have colder average temperatures with little seasonal variation Have variable temperatures based on the season None of the above

25 Slide 25 / ll of the following are factors that influence the climate within a biome EXEPT Latitude ltitude istance from the Sun The greenhouse effect

26 Slide 26 / Which two biomes experience the least amount of precipitation? Tropical rain forest and temperate grassland Tropical savanna and tropical dry forest Tundra and desert oreal forest and tundra

27 Slide 27 / Which organism would most likely be found in the biome characterized by permafrost, cold temperatures, and little vegetation? Polar bear Moose Iguana Whitetail deer

28 Slide 28 / The photic zone of the Ocean Extends to the bottom of the Ocean Extends to a depth of about 200 meters Is deep, cold, and permanently dark Is where chemosynthetic bacteria are the only producers

29 Slide 29 / Ponds and lakes are examples of Flowing-water ecosystems Wetlands Standing-water ecosystems Estuaries

30 Slide 30 / Which statement is a valid inference if the human population continues to grow at current rates? Future ecosystems will be distressed and many animal habitats will be destroyed. Global warming will decrease as a result of lower demand for fossil fuels. Over one hundred years after resources are used up the human population will level off. The human population can continue to grow at this rate indefinitely.

31 Slide 31 / Fertilizer runoff into a lake results in eath of algae and other aquatic plants Toxic levels of carbon dioxide entering the water lgal bloom Increased levels of dissolved oxygen

32 Slide 32 / iological magnification refers to The higher concentrations of toxins in the tissues of higher order consumers exposed to toxic waste. The higher concentrations of toxins in the tissues of primary producers exposed to toxic waste. The intensification of the effects of pollution in an ecosystem. Increased levels of carbon dioxide in the Earth s atmosphere.

33 Slide 33 / Rabbits introduced into ustralia have become a serious pest. Rabbit populations have grown so rapidly they have displaced other native species of herbivores. Which statement best explains the reason behind their rapid population growth? Rabbits have a high metabolic rate. There are few native predators of rabbits in ustralia. dditional rabbit species have been introduced. There is an increase in rabbit competitors.

34 Slide 34 / Why are fossil fuels nonrenewable? They require hundreds of millions of years to form. Their ecosystems change forever when they are burned. They are converted to carbon dioxide when they are burned. They exist in very small supply.

35 Slide 35 / The wearing away of surface soil by water and wind is called esertification Nitrification Soil erosion Monoculture

36 Slide 36 / Scientists think an increase in the amount of carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere may be causing verage temperatures to increase blanket of greenhouse gases to surround the Earth hole in the O-zone layer Global cooling

37 Slide 37 / Which of the following is an example of a human activity that would preserve finite resources? urn fossil fuels to heat homes Remove carnivores from a forest Recycle aluminum uild a dam

38 Slide 38 / Which human activity would have the most positive effect on an environment? Using fire to eliminate most plants from an area Spraying herbicides to eliminate weeds Protecting native flowers and grasses in an area Introducing a foreign plant species to an area

39 Slide 39 / The goals of conservation biologist include all of the following EXEPT Wise management of natural resources Introduction of non-native species into ecosystems Preservation of habitats and wildlife Protection of biodiversity

40 Slide 40 / Using renewable resources while ensuring that they are not depleted is a practice called Monoculture Subsistence hunting Sustainable development Ecological succession

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