CORROSION MANAGEMENT MATURITY MODEL

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1 CORROSION MANAGEMENT MATURITY MODEL CMMM Model Definition AUTHOR Jeff Varney Executive Director APQC Page 1 of 35

2 TABLE OF CONTENTS OVERVIEW... 5 I. INTRODUCTION The Need The Corrosion Management Maturity Model The Corrosion Management Product Suite About This Document... 7 II. CMMM MATURITY LEVELS Level 1 Reactive Level 2 Defined and Compliant Level 3 Managed and Integrated Level 4 Optimized and Proactive Level 5 Innovative and Leading III. CMMM MANAGEMENT SYSTEM DOMAINS Key Characteristics and Capability Statements Domain Structure IV. POLICY (POL)...13 Key Characteristics Capability Statements (By Maturity Level) V. STAKEHOLDER INTEGRATION (STA)...15 Key Characteristics Capability Statements (By Maturity Level) Page 2 of 35

3 VI. ORGANIZATION (ORG)...17 Key Characteristics Capability Statements (By Maturity Level) VII. ACCOUNTABILITY (ACT)...19 Key Characteristics Capability Statements (By Maturity Level) VIII. RESOURCES (RES)...21 Key Characteristics Capability Statements (By Maturity Level) IX. CULTURE AND KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT (CKM)...23 Key Characteristics Capability Statements (By Maturity Level) X. COMMUNICATION (COM)...25 Key Characteristics Capability Statements (By Maturity Level) XI. CORROSION MANAGEMENT PRACTICES INTEGRATION (CMP)...27 Key Characteristics Capability Statements (By Maturity Level) XII. CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT (IMP)...29 Key Characteristics Capability Statements (By Maturity Level) XIII. PERFORMANCE MEASURES (PER)...30 Page 3 of 35

4 Key Characteristics Capability Statements (By Maturity Level) XIV. USING THE CMMM CMMM Scoring The CMMM Navigation Process Using CMMM Data Performing a CMMM Assessment About APQC Page 4 of 35

5 OVERVIEW The Corrosion Management Maturity Model (CMMM) is an organizational assessment tool created by NACE, the National Association of Corrosion Engineers. The model provides a framework for understanding the current extent of corrosion management (CM) operations and practices within an organization, a context for establishing strategic objectives and implementation plans in support of improving corrosion policies and practices, and a means to evaluate progress over time toward those objectives. The CMMM is composed of 10 domains and five maturity levels as detailed in this document, which contains the full definition and description of the model. Introductory material to aid in the understanding of the purpose and use of the CMMM is also provided. The primary audiences for the CMMM, and for this document, are organizations seeking guidance related to improving their corrosion operations and practices. The audience also includes any stakeholders for such organizations that will be part of improving corrosion management and corrosion control with that organization. Page 5 of 35

6 I. INTRODUCTION 1.1 THE NEED The global cost of corrosion is estimated to be US$2.5 trillion and it is estimated that savings of between 15 and 35% of the cost of corrosion could be realized by using available corrosion control practices. During the 2015 International Measures of Prevention, Application, and Economics of Corrosion Technologies (IMPACT) study sponsored by NACE, the advisory panel and project team identified a need to more explicitly assess corrosion management within organizations. The study concluded that, to achieve the full extent of potential savings implementing a Corrosion Management System (CMS) and its integration into an organization s overall management system is mandatory. The IMPACT study defined a CMS as a set of policies, processes, and procedures for planning, executing, and continually improving the ability of an organization to manage the threat of corrosion for existing and future assets. During the study, corrosion control practices across management system domains and the life cycle of assets were evaluated. While powerful, the structure used lacked the detail to clearly assess how well an organization was doing and what the next steps might be. The CMMM was developed by NACE to address these concerns. 1.2 THE CORROSION MANAGEMENT MATURITY MODEL The CMMM is a structured model of corrosion management capabilities organized by: Maturity level levels of progressively higher capability Management system domains groupings of related characteristics and associated capabilities (e.g., resource management or organizational structure) The CMMM represents the elements of a CMS deemed essential to achieve improved corrosion management and corrosion control, supporting the goals toward corrosion cost and risk reduction over time. The CMMM is intended for use primarily by asset owners and operators, but may also be beneficial for a broader set of stakeholders for degradable assets (e.g., suppliers, service providers, etc.). 1.3 THE CORROSION MANAGEMENT PRODUCT SUITE The CMMM is part of the NACE IMPACT Plus product suite as depicted in Figure 1. Within this IMPACT Plus product suite, the CMMM has several components provided to realize its benefits: 1. CMMM Assessment a structured assessment tool that allows organizations to evaluate their current state against the CMMM capabilities Page 6 of 35

7 2. CMMM Assessment Report a detailed report of an organization s current state, with comparisons to blinded, aggregate results 3. CMMM Aggregate Results blinded, aggregate results, from the community of organizations that have also completed a CMMM assessment, that depict the maturity level by domain and capability-specific distribution of organizations current state, used for comparison purposes NACE s Impact Plus Product Suite Figure 1 Additional information about the components of the IMPACT Plus product suite can be found at nace.org/impactplus. 1.4 ABOUT THIS DOCUMENT This document fully defines the structure and components of the CMMM: Section II maturity levels Section III management system domains Sections IV XIII key characteristics and capability statements for each management system domain, organized by maturity level Page 7 of 35

8 II. CMMM MATURITY LEVELS Five levels of maturity are defined in the CMMM as shown in Figure 2. The levels of maturity represent defined stages, described in terms of capabilities, of an organization s progress toward achieving its corrosion vision in terms of policy, stakeholder integration, accountability, resources, communication, continuous improvement, and performance measures. The Five Levels of the CMMM Figure 2 The lowest maturity level in the model represents an organization that has not implemented a consistent and comprehensive corrosion management practice end-to-end. As the organization begins to implement and integrate end-to-end corrosion management, the organization s maturity rating would be increased across one or more of the domains to higher maturity levels. An organization can establish its current maturity level by completing a CMMM assessment and having it scored. With this baseline, or starting point, in mind, the utility can establish objectives for the timing and extent of its improvement efforts by setting maturity level targets for each of the domains in the model for a particular time window. Additional assessments can be completed to track progress toward the established objectives. While higher levels of maturity in the model are consistent with an organization that is successfully adopting and benefiting from corrosion management improvement efforts, it is important for each organization to establish its own target maturity levels based on its own Page 8 of 35

9 unique operating profile, strategy, and timeline. Achieving Level 5 in any domain is not necessarily the goal for an organization and is unlikely to be an appropriate goal for many organizations. Each organization must assess the cost/benefit of higher maturity levels to set appropriate targets. A CMMM assessment provides an organization with a maturity rating for each of the model s 10 management system domains (hereafter referred to as domains). Domains are logical groupings of corrosion-related capabilities and characteristics. The model s 10 domains are shown below and are described in Section III. 1. Policy 2. Stakeholder Integration 3. Organization 4. Accountability 5. Resources 6. Culture and Knowledge Management 7. Communication 8. Corrosion Management Practices Integration 9. Continuous Improvement 10. Performance Measures The levels of maturity organize the expected characteristics for each domain into hierarchical groupings. Each level builds upon the next, so an organization must achieve Level 1 in a domain in order to achieve Level 2 in that domain, and so forth. In order to achieve a level within a domain, the organization must demonstrate that it has sufficiently implemented the expected characteristics defined for that level in that domain area. While an organization will receive a specific level rating for each domain, that organization may possess some characteristics associated with higher maturity levels. The following sections provide additional detail on each of the five maturity levels. 2.1 LEVEL 1 REACTIVE At this level, the need for corrosion management may have been identified, but there is no strategic focus within the organization. Corrosion management activities occur on an as-needed basis; however, there is no systematic plan in place to address corrosion needs more consistently Corrosion activities, while often governed by standards and regulations, are defined and managed by individuals and within teams Cross-team and organizational alignment for corrosion control practices is limited and typically informal Page 9 of 35

10 2.2 LEVEL 2 DEFINED AND COMPLIANT At level 2, corrosion management practices are locally consistent. Corrosion management has been defined by the organization, but corrosion engineers only are compliant with the standard or bare minimum of requirements Some corrosion management processes may have been defined, but typically these are still isolated and not part of any integrated management approach Consistency in corrosion control activities within teams, projects and local organizational units is expected Organization-wide coordination and alignment may still be informal 2.3 LEVEL 3 MANAGED AND INTEGRATED At level 3, an organization has a comprehensive, enterprise-wide corrosion management approach. End-to-end standards, policies, processes and procedures exist Common roles and accountability structures in place for corrosion specific needs CM is integrated with a well-structured organizational management approach Organization-wide coordination and alignment is defined and communicated 2.4 LEVEL 4 OPTIMIZED AND PROACTIVE A level 4 the CM program is visible across the organization. The CM program should be fully implemented and include lessons learned activities built into CM processes to capture and apply learnings to improve those processes The program may exhibit some anticipatory capabilities as well, such as succession planning for key corrosion roles Visibility to corrosion performance metrics enables leadership to leverage into strategies and future plans 2.5 LEVEL 5 INNOVATIVE AND LEADING Level 5 represents a progressive and inclusive CM program with highly engaged stakeholders at all levels of the organization. The stakeholders proactively seek out state-of-the-art CM practices and the program itself is anticipatory, agile (semi real-time), and embedded in the flow of work in the organization The organization seeks to not only improve itself, but actively improve their industry and corrosion management across industries Page 10 of 35

11 III. CMMM MANAGEMENT SYSTEM DOMAINS Management system domains are logical groupings of related capabilities and characteristics for which the CMMM defines a maturity progression. Each level of maturity within a domain builds upon the previous, so an organization must achieve Level 1 to achieve Level 2, and so forth. Each level of maturity within a domain is fully described by a set of key characteristics and a set related capability statements. The CMMM Version 1.0 includes the following 10 domains: 1. Policy (POL) 2. Stakeholder Integration (STA) 3. Organization (ORG) 4. Accountability (ACT) 5. Resources (RES) 6. Culture and Knowledge Management (CKM) 7. Communication (COM) 8. Corrosion Management Practices Integration (CMP) 9. Continuous Improvement (IMP) 10. Performance Measures (PER) 3.1 KEY CHARACTERISTICS AND CAPABILITY STATEMENTS Key characteristics are the standard capabilities that an organization must implement or exhibit within a domain. They provide a framework of characteristics that translate into specific capabilities statements at increasing levels of maturity within a domain. Each capability is a declarative statement to support the consistent evaluation of its implementation and its independence from other capability statements within the model. While it is possible that an organization may exhibit capabilities associated with several maturity levels within a domain, the model requires that for a given level of maturity to be achieved, the capability for that level and all lower levels in that domain must be sufficiently implemented. For an organization to achieve Level 2 in a given domain, for example, it must sufficiently implement the capabilities aligned to the same key characteristic for both Level 1 and Level 2 in that domain. Every capability statement in the CMMM corresponds to a single question in the CMMM Assessment, the instrument used for measuring an organization s current maturity profile. The CMMM uses a simple labeling system to uniquely identify each expected characteristic in the model. The label for a given characteristic is defined by its domain abbreviation, the maturity level where it resides, and its characteristic number. The label POL-2.3, for example, refers to the third expected characteristic, at maturity Level 2, for the Policy domain. 3.2 DOMAIN STRUCTURE The next 10 sections (Section 4 through Section 13) of this document contain descriptions of each domain. Each section follows the same structure, consisting of a brief domain overview, Page 11 of 35

12 identification of the domain s key characteristics, followed by capability statements for each of the five levels. The domain overview establishes the domain s boundaries and provides an overview of the maturity progression. The maturity elaboration for each level begins with a list of expected characteristics followed by the capability statements that describe what would be expected at each level of maturity within this domain. Page 12 of 35

13 IV. POLICY (POL) The Policy (POL) domain encompasses CM objectives, policy, and strategy. Namely, this domain is associated with key principles and requirements utilized to manage corrosion threats over the asset or asset system life cycle. Policies are foundational to CM planning and strategy and must assess and address external and internal factors (e.g., environmental, legal, regulatory, or societal.) KEY CHARACTERISTICS P-1 Organization has defined and communicated CM policy that address purpose, objectives, and goals across asset lifecycle P-2 CM policies aligned to measurable organizational outcomes P-3 CM strategy linked to measurable financial goals and outcomes across asset lifecycle P-4 CM policy includes impact of environmental, legal, regulatory, or societal factors P-5 CM integrated into organizational strategy P-6 Corporate social responsibility groups evaluate CM practices on external environment and have targeted programs to address concerns P-7 Organization has identified, assessed, and defined CM risks across asset lifecycle and has either accepted or mitigated those risks P-8 CM plan guides the design, construction/manufacturing, maintenance/operations, and abandonment of degradable assets P-9 Plans for design, construction/manufacturing, maintenance/operations, and abandonment of degradable assets integrated across organization P-10 CM projects evaluated according to value based costing instead of lowest price costing CAPABILITY STATEMENTS (BY MATURITY LEVEL) Level 1 POL-1.1 POL-1.2 POL-1.3 POL-1.4 POL-1.5 CE standards identified on a project basis CE objectives defined on a project basis CE standards identified for operating assets Corrosion risks addressed as they are identified Corrosion risks are identified on a project basis Level 2 POL-2.1 POL-2.2 POL-2.3 POL-2.4 Level 3 POL-3.1 Recommendations for corrosion engineering incorporated into asset management plans Strategies and metrics for corrosion control practices identified Interactions with CE stakeholders are defined and conducted at the local (project, department, or functional) level Policies and standards aligned with external stakeholder's interests Enterprise CM policy defined and documented that includes purpose, objectives, goals, training, certification, and authority Page 13 of 35

14 POL-3.2 POL-3.3 POL-3.4 POL-3.5 POL-3.6 POL-3.7 POL-3.8 POL-3.9 POL-3.10 Level 4 POL-4.1 POL-4.2 POL-4.3 POL-4.4 POL-4.5 POL-4.6 POL-4.7 POL-4.8 POL-4.9 Level 5 POL-5.1 POL-5.1 POL-5.1 POL-5.1 Enterprise CM policies and strategies define process safety requirements CM policies and standards integrated with operational activities Corrosion R&D activities conducted for identified improvement opportunities CM policies aligned to measurable enterprise outcomes CM policies and standards across enterprise aligned to external stakeholder's interests Enterprise CM plans developed across the asset lifecycle Enterprise has identified CM risks across asset lifecycle and has either accepted or mitigated those risks Enterprise's CM lessons learned drive local CM strategies Corrosion optimization activities conducted to identify practice improvement opportunities Enterprise's CM strategy aligns with enterprise's process safety/hse strategy CM policy requires regular assessments to identify potential risks Enterprise evaluates CM policy compliance and tracks resolution of noncompliance Identified CM risks are evaluated for mitigation and where not feasible, contingency plans in place CM policy, strategy, and plans includes impact of external as well as internal factors (e.g., environmental, legal, regulatory, and/or societal) Impact of CM policy to outcomes measured and visible to senior leadership. CM policies and plans integrated with other disciplines across enterprise (e.g., quality assurance, continuous improvement and management of change practices) Policies and standards for external CM stakeholders integrated with the enterprise's policies and standards Strategic objectives and goals drive focus on corrosion management optimization and R&D activities Corporate social responsibility groups evaluate impact of CM policy, strategy and plans on external environment and implement targeted programs to address concerns Policies and strategies establish asset integrity and asset systems safety as a priority Enterprise periodically evaluates CM policy to address changes to environmental and societal sustainability CM-related risks are communicated and understood at all levels of the enterprise Page 14 of 35

15 V. STAKEHOLDER INTEGRATION (STA) The Stakeholder Integration (STA) domain indicates how organizations should work with external and internal stakeholders. The key purpose of this domain is to ensure the organization is aligned with key stakeholder desires. This domain also includes how CM key performance indicators (KPIs) are managed and used to monitor CM compliance across the organization. KEY CHARACTERISTICS SI-1 External and internal stakeholders identified and integrated into CM lifecycle SI-2 Policies and standards of external stakeholders evaluated for alignment with organizational policies and standards SI-3 Appropriate service level agreements or contractual requirements established with external and internal stakeholders SI-4 CM performance measures and KPIs established SI-5 CM performance monitored and reported SI-6 CM performance management integrated into organizational performance management SI-7 External and internal CM compliance monitored SI-8 CM non-compliance tracked through resolution SI-9 Organization has a defined and communicated CM outsourcing strategy SI-10 External and internal stakeholders audited and reviewed on periodic basis for alignment with organizational requirements CAPABILITY STATEMENTS (BY MATURITY LEVEL) Level 1 STA-1.1 STA-1.2 Level 2 STA-2.1 STA-2.2 Stakeholder engagement is defined by CE personnel Expectations and needs of internal stakeholders are known Interactions with CE stakeholders conducted at the local level Corrosion engineering philosophy for outsourcing defined locally Level 3 STA-3.1 STA-3.2 STA-3.3 STA-3.4 STA-3.5 STA-3.6 Level 4 STA-4.1 Internal CM stakeholders are integrated into the enterprise CM program Expectations and needs of external stakeholders are established enterprisewide CM performance measures and KPIs are established for the enterprise Collaboration with CM personnel occurs with identified external stakeholders across the enterprise Enterprise has a defined CM outsourcing strategy Internal and external interactions with CE stakeholders are managed according to policy External CM stakeholders leveraged for improvements to the enterprise CM program Page 15 of 35

16 STA-4.2 STA-4.3 STA-4.4 STA-4.5 STA-4.6 STA-4.7 STA-4.8 STA-4.9 Level 5 STA-5.1 STA-5.1 Expectations and needs of both internal and external stakeholders are embedded into service level agreements and contractual requirements Corrosion related activities monitored and reported CM non-compliance resolution communicated to stakeholders CM effectiveness measures are utilized to balance the level of CM activities across lifecycle phases (TAP members - We need examples of measures that evaluate the effectiveness of CM) Enterprise has a defined and communicated CM outsourcing strategy Enterprise CM service providers audited and reviewed on a periodic basis CM performance measures and KPIs are reviewed to ensure alignment with enterprise expectations CM performance is integrated into management dashboards Corrosion measures benchmarked across companies and geographies to identify improvement opportunities CM measures are aligned to industry wide measures Page 16 of 35

17 VI. ORGANIZATION (ORG) The Organization (ORG) domain evaluates whether CM is centralized or distributed throughout the organization. The domain evaluates the interaction and reporting structures for corrosion and design engineers, vendors, and suppliers within the organization. KEY CHARACTERISTICS O-1 CM roles and responsibilities linked to defined organizational structure O-2 Interactions with CM practitioners defined across organizational structure (i.e., managed organizational matrix, including external suppliers, vendors, and stakeholders) O-3 Formalized CM group exists to support full lifecycle of all degradable assets within the organization O-4 Effective management of the matrix in place (i.e., embedded versus centralized) O-5 Corrosion activities aligned and embedded in other functional processes and work activities CAPABILITY STATEMENTS (BY MATURITY LEVEL) Level 1 ORG-1.1 ORG-1.2 ORG-1.3 Level 2 ORG-2.1 ORG-2.2 ORG-2.3 ORG-2.4 Level 3 ORG-3.1 ORG-3.2 ORG-3.3 Level 4 ORG-4.1 ORG-4.2 ORG-4.3 CE roles and responsibilities are defined and assigned on a project basis Interactions with external and internal CE stakeholders managed on a project basis CE resources available to support the asset lifecycle CE roles and responsibilities are defined in accordance with enterprise policies and standards, but are managed locally Interactions with CE stakeholders are defined locally An enterprise structure established to facilitate CM collaboration A formal enterprise CM group exists CM roles and responsibilities are integrated and standardized as a part of the enterprise's policies and standards Internal and external interactions with CM stakeholders are managed and integrated CM personnel integrated in all enterprise initiatives CM roles and responsibilities are evaluated periodically for relevancy and updated as needed CM collaboration is embedded in CM stakeholder performance expectations Accountability for improvements to CM policies, procedures, and standards assigned Page 17 of 35

18 Level 5 ORG-5.1 Formalized CM group represents the organization in external industry and crossindustry forums to improve CM practices Page 18 of 35

19 VII. ACCOUNTABILITY (ACT) The Accountability (ACT) domain focuses on the responsibilities and authority of CM roles in the organization. The domain evaluates the integration of CM personnel, including contractors and external resources, in other disciplines and functions of the organization. KEY CHARACTERISTICS A-1 CM roles and responsibilities defined, documented, and communicated A-2 CM roles and responsibilities integrated into work processes A-3 CM roles and responsibilities formally embedded in job descriptions and professional performance management A-4 CM decision authority defined and communicated A-5 Organizational understanding of CM roles and responsibilities A-6 Organization has dedicated resources for external stakeholder engagement A-7 CM personnel consulted and engaged in supplier and vendor selection processes A-8 CM personnel consulted and involved in supplier and vendor management and oversight A-9 Organization has established accountability for CM asset design approval, acceptance and commissioning, maintenance scheduling, monitoring, performance, and abandonment A-10 CM performance measures identified and aligned with organizational accountability structures (i.e., individual performance reviews, bonus structure) A-11 CM resource allocation linked, embedded, and sustained into organizational accountability structures A-12 Organization articulates and understands value of CM roles and responsibilities A-13 CM accountability structures reviewed on a just-in-time and periodic basis CAPABILITY STATEMENTS (BY MATURITY LEVEL) Level 1 ACT-1.1 ACT-1.2 Level 2 ACT-2.1 ACT-2.2 ACT-2.3 ACT-2.4 ACT-2.5 Level 3 ACT-3.1 ACT-3.2 CE decision authority defined on a project basis CE accountability structures are reviewed on a project-by-project basis CE roles and responsibilities integrated into local work processes CE roles and responsibilities are recognized by other disciplines (e.g., procurement, engineering, construction, maintenance, etc.) CE requirements should be provided by CE personnel to support supplier and vendor management and oversight CE accountability across the asset lifecycle is established locally CE authority sufficient to influence enterprise accountability CM roles and responsibilities defined, documented, and communicated to enterprise Decision authority embedded in the CM role definitions consistently across the enterprise Page 19 of 35

20 ACT-3.3 ACT-3.4 ACT-3.5 ACT-3.6 ACT-3.7 ACT-3.8 Level 4 ACT-4.1 ACT-4.2 ACT-4.3 ACT-4.4 Level 5 ACT-5.1 ACT-5.2 Supplier and vendor selection processes engage CM personnel CM personnel engage in supplier and vendor management and oversight CM accountability established across the enterprise, including authority levels for CM specialists based on identified corrosion risk levels Enterprise CM accountability structures incorporate CM performance measures CM resources allocated to fulfill accountability structures CM roles and accountability structures reviewed periodically Enterprise has dedicated CM resources for external CM stakeholder engagement CM personnel have a defined set of responsibilities for supplier and vendor management and oversight CM performance measures are aligned with enterprise CM objectives Compliance to CM accountability monitored CM roles and responsibilities are aligned to industry organizations and peers CM personnel are engaged in evolving and maturing CM accountability structures across the industry Page 20 of 35

21 VIII. RESOURCES (RES) The Resources (RES) domain evaluates organizational commitment to identifying and managing CM personnel and other resources responsible for development, implementation, or continuous improvement of CM practices. The domain also assesses and ensures allocation of appropriate resources to deliver CM programs across the organization. KEY CHARACTERISTICS R-1 Corrosion engineering (CE) and CM staffing levels identified and supported for design, construction and manufacturing, maintenance and operation, and abandonment of degradable assets R-2 Appropriate budgets established and allocated to support CE and CM staffing levels R-3 CE and CM competencies defined and communicated with respect to experience, education, and knowledge R-4 CE and CM competencies aligned to role descriptions R-5 CE and CM resources assigned based on position requirements and resource competencies R-6 CE and CM competencies integrated into work processes R-7 Succession planning conducted for key CE and CM positions R-8 External and internal certification programs used to qualify resources R-9 Defined CE and CM career path CAPABILITY STATEMENTS (BY MATURITY LEVEL) Level 1 RES-1.1 RES-1.2 Level 2 RES-2.1 RES-2.2 RES-2.3 RES-2.4 RES-2.5 Level 3 RES-3.1 RES-3.2 RES-3.3 RES-3.4 RES-3.5 RES-3.6 Corrosion resources assigned for projects and operations Corrosion laboratory facilities outsourced Corrosion staffing levels identified locally across the asset lifecycle Corrosion competencies defined and documented locally Corrosion resources qualified to meet position requirements CE laboratory facilities apply consistent outsourcing requirements across projects and assets Budgets to support corrosion activities are adequate CM competency definitions include experience, education, knowledge, and industry-recognized technical certifications Budgets to support corrosion staffing levels established across the enterprise Corrosion competencies aligned to formalized role descriptions at the enterprise level Corrosion laboratory facilities include blend of internal and locally-outsourced capabilities Corrosion resources are assigned based on resource competencies Corrosion competencies are embedded into enterprise work process requirements Page 21 of 35

22 RES-3.7 Level 4 RES-4.1 RES-4.2 RES-4.3 RES-4.4 RES-4.5 RES-4.6 RES-4.7 RES-4.8 Level 5 RES-5.1 RES-5.2 RES-5.3 RES-5.4 RES-5.5 External certification programs are used to qualify corrosion resources Budgets to support corrosion staffing levels are established within strategic budgeting and planning cycle Corrosion competencies are visible to the enterprise Succession planning conducted for key corrosion positions Enterprise-wide integration of corrosion laboratory facilities An internal certification program is defined and established to qualify corrosion resources to enterprise corrosion processes and standards Availability of corrosion resources drives workforce planning An enterprise corrosion career path is defined, documented, and communicated A prequalified candidate pool is maintained for recruiting and developing talent to fill resource needs Succession planning for all corrosion roles across the enterprise Enterprise-wide corrosion laboratory facilities perform R&D and innovation Corrosion staff lead and influence industry practices and regularly contribute to industry training, development and certification programs Corrosion personnel are engaged in industry competency development A blend of external and internal training and certification programs are used to develop and qualify corrosion resources Page 22 of 35

23 IX. CULTURE AND KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT (CKM) The Culture and Knowledge Management (CKM) domain focuses on the management of critical information of the organization, namely, content and documentation management, and the integration of CM practices into the culture of the organization. This domain also explores how all learning opportunities (informal, proactive, and reactive) can be embedded into the flow of work for CM-related personnel. KEY CHARACTERISTICS CKM-1 CM knowledge capture and transfer processes embedded into organization knowledge transfer processes CKM-2 Collaborative approaches (e.g., online discussion forums, MS SharePoint sites, etc.) for CE and CM established CKM-3 Process for CM lessons captured and learned CKM-4 CM and CE best practice transfer approach across organization CKM-5 Leadership culture of openness to prevent negative ramifications of sharing critical information CKM-6 Established CE and CM content management practices enable identification and access to critical documentation CKM-7 Organization identifies and provides access to CE and CM Subject Matter Experts CKM-8 Leadership aware of and actively engaged in CM practices CKM-9 Cross-discipline and cross-functional awareness and engagement of CM practices CAPABILITY STATEMENTS (BY MATURITY LEVEL) Level 1 CKM-1.1 CKM-1.2 CKM-1.3 Level 2 CKM-2.1 CKM-2.2 CKM-2.3 CKM-2.4 CKM-2.5 CKM-2.6 Level 3 CKM-3.1 CKM-3.2 CKM-3.3 Documentation is managed on a project basis Collaboration occurs within projects, teams and personal networks Corrosion personnel capture lessons learned on a project-by-project basis Corrosion lessons learned are shared locally Corrosion best practices are captured locally Awareness of corrosion practices locally Corrosion subject matter experts are known locally Corrosion artifacts are identified and organized locally Corrosion personnel leverage the enterprise's collaboration capabilities (e.g., discussion forums, instant messaging) Enterprise approach for identification, capture, and use of corrosion lessons learned Enterprise approach for identification, capture, and use of corrosion best practices Open culture of sharing and learning across enterprise corrosion program Page 23 of 35

24 CKM-3.4 CKM-3.5 CKM-3.6 CKM-3.7 Level 4 CKM-4.1 CKM-4.2 CKM-4.3 CKM-4.4 CKM-4.5 Level 5 CKM-5.1 CKM-5.2 Enterprise-wide corrosion training plan exists Corrosion subject matter experts identified and accessible across the enterprise Corrosion content management workflows standardized across the enterprise Enterprise recognizes value of corrosion roles and responsibilities Corrosion lessons learned integrated as a part of enterprise's standard workflows Corrosion best-practice transfer integrates systemically with other disciplines across enterprise Collaboration for corrosion is the expectation and norm beyond corrosion personnel Cross-functional and cross-discipline engagement in corrosion practices Corrosion communication and training plans integrated into enterprise communication and training plans Corrosion best practice sharing across industry Corrosion subject matter experts lead or drive external industry and crossindustry forums to improve CM Page 24 of 35

25 X. COMMUNICATION (COM) The Communication (COM) domain focuses on interactions with key stakeholders to the CM process. The domain evaluates the communication between the design and operation sides of CM, between external and internal stakeholders, as well as how the organization engages in industry-wide CM efforts. KEY CHARACTERISTICS C-1 CM processes and standards communicated across the organization C-2 Organization promotes importance of CM practices C-3 Process to capture and visibly communicate employee CM concerns to key decisions makers (i.e., vertical communications) C-4 Communication between responsible CM groups actively employed C-5 KPIs established and communicated to demonstrate effectiveness and improvement of CM C-6 Process to communicate to external CM stakeholders established and applied C-7 Communication plan addresses external CM information transfer C-8 Process for capturing corrosion lessons learned in place and utilized by all stakeholders CAPABILITY STATEMENTS (BY MATURITY LEVEL) Level 1 COM-1.1 COM-1.2 Level 2 COM-2.1 COM-2.2 Level 3 COM-3.1 COM-3.2 COM-3.3 Level 4 COM-4.1 COM-4.2 COM-4.3 COM-4.4 COM-4.5 Corrosion personnel promote awareness of CE processes and standards locally Corrosion personnel communicate within projects and teams Corrosion personnel promote awareness of CM processes and standards across the enterprise Corrosion communications are part of local communication plans A corrosion communication plan is in place and executed to raise awareness of CM policies, processes, and practices internally Corrosion personnel promote the value of CM to the enterprise with senior leaders and key internal stakeholders A process for capturing and communicating corrosion concerns is in place across the enterprise Internal and external CM communication vehicles have a brand to assist in raising awareness of the value of CM policy, processes, and practices Enterprise articulates value of CM roles and responsibilities to their external and internal audiences CM concerns are communicated to business leaders and tracked to resolution Corrosion personnel promote awareness of CM processes and standards to external stakeholders Corrosion communication plans extend messaging to external stakeholders Page 25 of 35

26 COM-4.6 Level 5 COM-5.1 COM-5.2 COM-5.3 CM communication plans integrated into enterprise communication plans Senior leadership promote the importance of CM processes and standards across the enterprise Corrosion communication plans extend messaging to external stakeholders across multiple channels (e.g., print media, , marketing, etc.) CM concerns are integrated into business strategy and planning Page 26 of 35

27 XI. CORROSION MANAGEMENT PRACTICES INTEGRATION (CMP) The Corrosion Management Practice Integration (CMP) domain considers the integration of all CM activities into established work processes. The domain evaluates the alignment of CM to Quality and other relevant disciplines and/or functions to remove communication and performance barriers. Incident tracking and resolution is also incorporated into this domain. KEY CHARACTERISTICS CMP-1 CM processes and tools aligned to and embedded into other disciplines (e.g., health, safety, environment, quality, risk, maintenance, integrity, engineering, etc.) CMP-1 CM practices incorporate threat and incident management (e.g., identification, assessment, and mitigation) CMP-1 Supplier and vendor corrosion control practices reviewed and approved CMP-1 Awareness and implementation of corrosion control practices across the lifecycle of degradable assets CMP-1 Corrosion control practices designed into systems and solutions CMP-1 Effective application of corrosion control practices across organization CMP-1 Organization influences industry-wide and discipline-specific processes and standards CMP-1 Corrosion control practices to audit and manage the oversight of suppliers and vendors established and implemented CMP-1 Asset life extension assessments developed and applied CAPABILITY STATEMENTS (BY MATURITY LEVEL) Level 1 CMP-1.1 CMP-1.2 CMP-1.3 Level 2 CMP-2.1 CMP-2.2 CMP-2.3 CMP-2.4 CMP-2.5 CMP-2.6 Level 3 CMP-3.1 CMP-3.2 CMP-3.3 CMP-3.4 CMP-3.5 CMP-3.6 CE requirements incorporated into basis of design Applicable regulatory compliance understood Reliance on outside parties for guidance CE processes and standards are defined locally Localized incident management accounts for corrosion threats Implementation of corrosion control practices site-specific Policies and standards for external CE stakeholders are developed locally Asset life extension assessments are developed locally Corrosion resources consulted on costing and sourcing strategies CM processes and standards are defined enterprise wide CM processes and tools are aligned to those of other key disciplines, e.g., health, safety, environment, quality, risk, etc. CM threat and incident management practices are embedded into operations emergency management processes and standards The enterprise defines corrosion control requirements for suppliers and vendors Corrosion control practices for critical assets consistently implemented across the enterprise Corrosion control practices consistent across systems enterprise wide Page 27 of 35

28 CMP-3.7 CMP-3.8 CMP-3.9 Level 4 CMP-4.1 CMP-4.2 CMP-4.3 CMP-4.4 CMP-4.5 CMP-4.6 CMP-4.7 CMP-4.8 Level 5 CMP-5.1 CMP-5.2 CMP-5.3 CMP-5.4 CMP-5.5 CMP-5.6 Enterprise-wide requirements and/or guidelines for asset life extension assessments developed and leveraged Enterprise guidelines for costing and sourcing strategies CM practices are factored into project business cases, but not explicitly delineated Corrosion processes and standards updated regularly CM processes aligned with other disciplines CM processes are monitored and controlled for non-compliance Effectiveness of corrosion control practices evaluated on an ongoing basis CM process non-compliance has defined corrective action plans Supplier and vendor corrosion control practices reviewed for compliance with enterprise requirements Asset life extension assessments are integrated into CM systems and solutions to enable extension determination CM threat and incident management analysis and resolution are tracked Influencing industry-wide processes and standards Enterprise visibility of threat and incident management includes both "push" and "pull" indicators, messaging, etc. Influence industry-wide supplier and vendor corrosion control practices Real-time notification of corrosion threats from data management systems CM systems and solutions automation provides asset life extension recommendations Continuous improvement considers alignment between CM and other disciplines Page 28 of 35

29 XII. CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT (IMP) The Continuous Improvement (IMP) domain evaluates improvement identification, prioritization, authorization, selection, and change management practices and processes. CM innovations, such as evaluation of evolving resources, are addressed and incorporated into this domain. Change management processes should be effectively documented and communicated across the organization. KEY CHARACTERISTICS CI-1 CM improvements identified, assessed, and prioritized across organization CI-2 Selected CM improvements funded, staffed, and measured for intended results CI-3 CM improvements adhered to the defined organizational management of change processes CI-4 Both internal and external improvement opportunities identified (in all related aspects of CM, e.g., technology, resourcing, processes, etc.) CAPABILITY STATEMENTS (BY MATURITY LEVEL) Level 1 IMP-1.1 Level 2 IMP-2.1 IMP-2.2 Level 3 IMP-3.1 IMP-3.2 IMP-3.3 Level 4 IMP-4.1 IMP-4.2 IMP-4.3 IMP-4.4 Level 5 IMP-5.1 IMP-5.2 Corrosion improvements are identified, assessed, and implemented on projectby-project basis Corrosion improvements are identified, assessed, and prioritized locally Corrosion improvement plans include change management activities Corrosion improvements are identified, assessed, and prioritized at the enterprise level Selected corrosion improvements are funded and staffed Change management strategies for corrosion improvements are aligned to the defined enterprise management of change process Selected internal corrosion improvements are measured for intended results Corrosion improvements are evaluated for compliance to enterprise management of change process CM improvements are prioritized as a part of enterprise-wide improvement assessments CM improvement opportunities are evaluated in the context of the extended value chain (including vendors and suppliers) Substantial internal improvements are communicated externally to advance the industry CM identifies, assesses, and implements other disciplines best practices to improve CM performance Page 29 of 35

30 XIII. PERFORMANCE MEASURES (PER) The Performance Measures (PER) domain focuses solely on quantifiable indicators capable of assessing and measuring how well an individual or organization is achieving its desired CM goals. KEY CHARACTERISTICS PM-1 CM cost measures have been identified and defined PM-2 Failure history PM-3 Cost versus lifetime PM-4 CM process non-conformance PM-5 Incident resolution PM-6 Impact of improvements or resolution CAPABILITY STATEMENTS (BY MATURITY LEVEL) Level 1 PER-1.1 PER-1.2 Level 2 PER-2.1 PER-2.2 PER-2.3 PER-2.4 PER-2.5 Level 3 PER-3.1 PER-3.2 PER-3.3 PER-3.4 PER-3.5 PER-3.6 PER-3.7 PER-3.8 Level 4 PER-4.1 PER-4.2 PER-4.3 PER-4.4 PER-4.5 PER-4.6 PER-4.7 External CE standards compliance External CE regulatory compliance Internal CE standards compliance CM cost locally Trend analysis is conducted locally (e.g., corrosion rate, anodic polarization, ER monitoring, etc.) Failure history locally Incident rate locally CM process compliance across organization CM cost across enterprise Impact of CM improvement (to include time to impact) CM metrics and KPIs benchmarked across enterprise Enterprise trend analysis for key corrosion metrics and KPIs conducted (e.g., corrosion rate, anodic polarization, ER monitoring, etc.) Enterprise failure rate Incident rate across enterprise CM data is captured in structured and consistent manner CM process standards, regulatory and process compliance across extended value chain CM cost across extended value chain Aggregate impact of CM improvement activities CM metrics and KPIs are reviewed and updated periodically (e.g., annually) CM cost integrated into total lifecycle cost of assets CM performance concerns are linked to annual business performance metrics CM metrics and KPI benchmarked externally Page 30 of 35

31 Level 5 PER-5.1 PER-5.2 PER-5.3 PER-5.4 PER-5.5 Application of benchmarks to drive industry-wide improvement Predictive analytics for key corrosion metrics and KPIs Predictive analytics linked in to autonomic systems CM system provides real-time visibility into CM performance CM metrics are integrated into organizational reporting (e.g., dashboards) Page 31 of 35

32 XIV. USING THE CMMM The previous sections of this document covered the details of the model. This final section provides a brief overview on how an organization can successfully use the model. The CMMM was created to serve as a management support tool for any organization with a CM strategy, processes, and procedures. The model provides a framework for understanding the current state of CM within the organization and provides a context for establishing future aspirations and strategies. As such, it has a number of valid uses: To establish a shared picture of CM objectives. To communicate the CM vision both internally and externally. To use as a strategic framework for identifying business and investment objectives. To benchmark and learn from others. To use as a guide to identify a specific roadmap or waypoints. To assess and prioritize current opportunities and projects. To use as a decision-making framework for investment purposes. To assess resource needs to move from one level to another in a domain. To measure progress CMMM SCORING Sample Maturity Profile <Organization Name> Corrosion Management Maturity Summary Management System Domains Maturity Level Stakeholder Culture & CMP Continuous Performance Policy Organization Accountability Resources Communications Integration KM Integration Improvement Measures 5 41% 26% 71% 33% 21% 12% 25% 44% 42% 12% 4 33% 55% 81% 72% 55% 52% 62% 71% 44% 34% 3 61% 71% 81% 64% 71% 72% 72% 78% 71% 73% 2 73% 82% 92% 77% 84% 82% 85% 88% 76% 94% 1 88% 84% 95% 100% 72% 67% 88% 94% 84% 100% Previous Results <date of previous assessment> <Organization Name> Corrosion Management Maturity Summary Management System Domains Maturity Level Stakeholder Culture & CMP Continuous Performance Policy Organization Accountability Resources Communications Integration KM Integration Improvement Measures 5 0% 26% 45% 0% 21% 12% 25% 44% 42% 0% 4 18% 55% 55% 55% 55% 32% 35% 54% 44% 25% 3 30% 71% 71% 64% 58% 58% 62% 78% 55% 64% 2 55% 82% 85% 72% 70% 62% 85% 88% 76% 84% 1 71% 84% 95% 100% 72% 67% 88% 94% 84% 100% Legend Fulfilled CM maturity Significant progress toward CM maturity No or initial progress toward CM maturity Incomplete submission Each maturity level within a CM domain has an associated score based upon the answers provided which quantifies your current state. Figure 3 An organization is rated in each domain of the model based on its answers to the questions in the CMMM assessment tool. The CMMM assessment is composed of both domain-specific and Page 32 of 35

33 organizational attribute questions. The maturity rating for a specific domain is entirely based on the domain-specific questions for that domain. The CMMM Assessment contains one domainspecific question for each expected capability in the model. An organization does not have to completely exhibit all expected capabilities of a given level of a domain to be rated at that level. Scoring criteria establish a level rating based on a composite of the responses to all domainspecific questions in that domain level. Higher ratings in a domain reflect a growing extent of CM implementation in an organization with respect to the subject of that domain. The result of a CMMM assessment is a maturity profile that includes maturity ratings for each of the 10 CMMM domains (see Figure 3) THE CMMM NAVIGATION PROCESS The Navigation Process Figure 4 A CMMM Navigation is facilitated by a NACE-certified CMMM Navigator. The Navigator assists an organization in understanding the CMMM and leads the organization through a process of assessing where the organization is against the CMMM and setting its aspirations relative to the CMMM. This process helps to build consensus within the organization about the CMMM and its CM strategy and goals. After completing all of the steps in the Preparation phase with the organization, the Navigator facilitates the completion of the CMMM assessment tool with corrosion stakeholders from throughout the organization. Because the answers collected in the CMMM assessment reflect the collective view from people across the organization, the Survey Workshop produces a more accurate description of the organization s current CM maturity. The CMMM assessment is then validated and scored to produce a maturity profile, such as the one in Figure 3. The Navigator analyzes the organization s scored CMMM data during the Analysis phase to provide findings that provide valuable insights based on the Navigator s domain expertise, knowledge of the CMMM, and familiarity with the organization. During the Aspirations Workshop, the Navigator presents the findings to the organization, and based on those findings, the business objectives, and an agreed upon timeframe, the organization s corrosion stakeholders begin to lay the foundation for their CM aspirations USING CMMM DATA An organization s ratings are best and most appropriately used to compare the organization against itself over time (e.g., to understand the effectiveness and impact of ongoing efforts or planning exercises in the context of the CMMM). However, as with any model that provides a score, there is often significant interest in comparing the scores of different organizations. While this might be an interesting exercise, it is important to be cautious when drawing conclusions from the results. There is a temptation to say that higher maturity scores within a Page 33 of 35

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