1st4sport Qualifications Self-assessment Report 2014

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1 1st4sport Qualifications Self-assessment Report 2014

2 Coachwise Ltd, 2015 This document is copyright under the Berne Convention. All rights are reserved. Apart from any fair dealing for the purposes of private study, research, criticism or review, as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1998, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, electrical, chemical, mechanical, optical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the copyright owner. Enquiries should be addressed to 1st4sport Qualifications. 1st4sport Qualifications Coachwise Ltd Chelsea Close Off Amberley Road Armley Leeds LS12 4HP Fax: Website: The Ofqual/Welsh Government/SQA-recognised awarding organisation 1st4sport Qualifications is a brand of Coachwise Ltd, the trading arm of The National Coaching Foundation (known as sports coach UK), the UK-registered charity leading the national development of coaches and the coaching system. Any proceeds go directly back to sports coach UK to help them develop and advance sport nationwide.

3 Contents Page I Executive Summary I 1 Introduction Overview Self-assessment The Self-assessment Process The Self-assessment Report 3 2 Methodology Performance Management The EFQM Excellence Model The Fundamental Concepts of Excellence The EFQM Model The RADAR Logic Self-assessment validation approaches The self-analysis matrix as the selected validation approach The workshop as the selected validation approach Type of Analysis Treatment of data, evidence and identification of trends 17 3 Results Weighting of EFQM criteria 19 SAR 2014 I

4 Contents Page 3.2 Analysis and representation of the EFQM scoring results EFQM self-analysis matrix responses and score Synopsis of EFQM Results Limitations of the self-assessment process and future recommendations (reflective ) Conclusion 31 Appendix 1 Education industry research and key trends (Ofqual Report and SQA Accreditation Annual Review) 32 AI Ofqual Statistical Release - Annual Qualifications Market Report England, Wales and Northern Ireland 32 BI SQA Accreditation Annual Review 54 Appendix 2 1st4sport performance statistics 62 Appendix 3 Strategic direction achievement rates 69 Appendix 4 Self evaluation - Statutory outcomes 80 Appendix 5 Benchmarking 96 Appendix 6 Stakeholder satisfaction levels 99 Appendix 7 Learner satisfaction levels 120 Appendix 8 1st4sport employee satisfaction levels 122 Appendix 9 External verifier satisfaction levels on training provision 127 Appendix 10 Qualification specific performance statistics 129 SAR 2014 II

5 I Self-assessment Report - Executive Summary Rationale 1st4sport Qualifications is an awarding organisation recognised and regulated in England by the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation (Ofqual), who also regulate vocational qualifications in Northern Ireland. 1st4sport are further regulated in Wales by The Welsh Government and in Scotland by the Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA). We specialise in offering vocational and occupational qualifications to service the sport, physical activity and active leisure industry. We work in partnership with a variety of organisations including Governing Bodies of Sport (GBS) and other organisations in the development of our qualifications. To ensure the continuous development and maintenance of our awarding function within a culture of excellence, we have established The 1st4sport Total Quality Management Approach. This approach is based upon the systematic deployment of the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) Excellence Model (2012), which involves implementation of the EFQM criteria set as our quality standards. To facilitate effective implementation of the approach, the quality standards are integrated within our strategic planning and common process framework, providing our organisation with a sustainable advantage in sectors in which we operate. This is achieved through effective performance management, which enables us to ensure our and organisational performance levels are monitored, managed and improved across all operations. Self-assessment, as the integral component of performance management is the effective technique, which contributes to systematic continuous improvement and indicates the current level of our performance. The self-assessment process and methodology Our quality standards are established in line with the revised EFQM model (figure I). To ensure consistent, valid and relevant performance results, which relate directly to the implementation of the quality standards, the EFQM model is also used to undertake self-assessment, ensuring it fits our corporate culture, needs and encourages organisational learning. The conduct of the self-assessment is based on: The Fundamental Concepts of Excellence The EFQM Excellence Model RADAR logic. Our performance is evaluated and outcomes validated via the RADAR assessment and management tool, and the self-analysis matrix. This combination of approaches enables the triangulation and accuracy of outcomes. A number of quantitative and qualitative data collection tools are used to facilitate valid and reliable performance outcomes. Outcomes are published in the self-assessment report annually on completion of the self-assessment process and made available to all stakeholders. The structure of the self- assessment report is based on the EFQM model, which facilitates an integrated approach to striving for organisational excellence. Strengths, areas for improvements and the resultant improvement plan, in line with the EFQM model, conclude the report. SAR Executive Summary I

6 Information systems enhancements have resulted in large amounts of data being generated every year, which contributes to the evaluation of our performance. Over the last few years a significant investment has been made in developing an effective technology portfolio in support of our awarding operation which enables effective auditing and the production of valid statistical data. The increased validity of results has enabled more accurate conclusions to be drawn. However, in some cases data is considered to represent individuals perceptions that may vary and deviate from the pragmatic state. At other times data provides only an indication of an outcome rather than an indisputable fact. In light of the above, we have been careful in making conclusions and identifying trends, ensuring that such have only been reached after careful consideration of all the factors which impact, to avoid misinterpretations and misuse of the data. Figure I. The EFQM Excellence Model (2012) SAR Executive Summary II

7 Key Outcomes One of the most critical areas of our self-assessment is the review and comparison of our performance with the industry trends, essential in establishing our planning and actions which impact on our competitive position. A review of the information presented in the regulators annual reports was undertaken to support this aim. The Ofqual Annual Qualifications Market Report 2013/2014 (published October, 2015) was used to obtain an overview of the market trends for regulated qualifications in England. Similarly, the SQA Accreditation Annual Review for 2014/2015 (published June, 2015) was used to obtain an overview of the qualification market size and trends in Scotland. Outcomes of the comparisons of industry benchmarks contributed into the identification of strengths and areas for improvement. Key outcomes are summarised in Table I. Summary of Key Outcomes in 2014 The industry trends (supply and demand in England) The industry trends (supply and demand in Scotland) Participation by 16 to 18 year-olds in total education and training increased to 86% and in full-time education it increased to 72%, reaching (highest level since 1994), due to the raising of the participation age as required by the Education and Skills Act With the exception of the health, public services and care sector and the social sciences sector all remaining 13 sector subject areas recorded a decrease in learner achievements in other qualifications. The preparation for life and work sector remained the largest in terms of number of achievements in other qualifications (2.6 million), however achievements decreased by 13%. The health, public services and care sector is now the second largest in terms achievements in other qualifications (over 1 million), following a large increase of 15%. Level 2 qualification achievements account for 44% of all achievements in qualifications other than GCSE and A level. The number of total achievements ( other qualifications, GCSE and A/AS level) decreased by 10% (from 17.9 to 16 million). The number of achievements in other qualifications decreased by 7% (from 9.2 to 8.5 million) mainly due to the new SFA funding rules. The number of achievements in QCF qualifications decreased by 6% (from 6.2 to 5.8 million). The number of achievements in functional skills increased by 18% (from 865,000 to just over 1 million). QCF remains the largest type of qualifications in terms of achievements followed by functional skills. Nearly 13,000 qualifications had at least one achievement recorded, representing 53% of available qualifications. The number of available qualifications increased by 6% (from 23,642 to almost 24,965). The largest increase (16%) is seen in the number of available regulated qualifications designed for the QCF (from 16,770 to 19,474). The number of available regulated functional skills qualifications increased by 3% (from 232 to 240) and ESOL by 3% (from 193 to 198). The total number of Ofqual recognised awarding organisations decreased to 166 from 176 the previous year. The qualifications market remains highly concentrated; 20 awarding organisations account for over 90% of all achievements. Registrations for SVQ qualifications in 2013/14 showed a decrease of 4% and certifications an increase of 3%. At the end of the operational year , there were 40 SQA Accreditation approved awarding bodies. The number of available accredited qualifications of the three qualification types was 1,023 (7% increase in other qualifications). Due to low or zero demand 43 accredited SVQs were withdrawn. In some instances, SVQs were replaced with alternative accredited competence-based qualifications; this been driven by Modern Apprenticeship Frameworks where the SVQ has not been successful. The largest number of available accredited qualifications are at SVQ levels 2 and 3 resultant of them being a mandatory qualification in Modern Apprenticeships. Of level 2 and 3 SVQs, 74% and 84% are present in Modern Apprenticeships respectively. Currently, 27 SVQ 4 qualifications and 7 SVQ 5 qualifications are part of Apprenticeship frameworks. SAR Executive Summary III

8 Summary of Key Outcomes in 2014 Our awarding status and levels Our market share Supply of our qualifications (plan of provision) Demand for our qualifications Our score against the EFQM model Ofqual awarding organisation status was maintained (including QCF accreditation and NQF Functional Skills status). Welsh Government awarding organisation status was maintained. SQA awarding body approval status has been maintained for our SVQ qualifications and audit outcomes were very positive. Of the 18 awarding bodies that were audited 1st4sport was amongst the 3 awarding bodies with the least number of issues (1) and amongst the 6 awarding bodies with the least number of recommendations (2). Self-evaluation outcomes, as a result of our continuous monitoring of our with regulations were satisfactory and improved in areas where refinement activities have been previously established. Additional systems/approaches were developed to generate evidence of in certain areas. We are ranked on the 25th position (from 24th last year) amongst 166 recognised awarding organisations who recorded achievements in 2013/14 academic year in the market for all regulated qualifications across 15 sectors. We still remain the third largest awarding organisation in terms of achievements in sector 08 - Leisure, Travel and Tourism (475,000 recorded achievements in the sector), amongst 47 recognised awarding organisations operating in this sector. We now operate across 5 sectors - we expanded our provision to sector 03 - Agriculture, horticulture and animal care with our suite of horse racing qualifications. The 1st4sport Level 1 Award in Coaching Football (QCF) is listed in the top 50 largest qualifications in terms of achievements (with 23,360 achievements) across all regulated qualifications (46th position). The portfolio of our qualifications continues to grow; 35 new qualifications were developed and accredited in 2014 ensuring the provision of our qualifications meets and exceeds end-users expectations. In 2014 we offered 277 qualifications in 33 sports, 122 qualifications being coaching qualifications. It should be noted that the life of some of these qualifications ended during 2014; pathways, disciplines and add-on modules are counted as separate qualifications. Of the 277 qualifications only 185 recorded learner achievements. Some of these qualifications without certificates have only become available during 2013 or were due to expire, and for others the length of course for completion may take 2 or 3 years. Our provision has been developed strategically and implemented methodically showing a continuous growth over the last few years. High levels of achievement (100%) of the implementation of our annual plan of provision were maintained this year. There has been an increase of 10% in the number of new organisations applying to become a 1st4sport recognised centre (from 84 to 92). This was accompanied by a significant increase of 42% in the number of new qualification approvals (from 330 to 469). These upward trends are primarily affected by the development of our horse racing qualification suite. The total number of events (5,300) authorised to be delivered by 1st4sport recognised centres remains high. There has been a decrease of 7% in learner registrations (from 73,438 to 65,866) and a decrease of 10% in learner certifications (from 61,510 to 57,198). The number of learners with multiple 1st4sport qualifications continues to grow; 60,239 of our learners obtained more than one of our qualifications up until The largest number of 1st4sport Qualifications obtained by a single learner is 13. Evaluation against the nine criteria (and 32 sub criteria) of the EFQM model shows a slight decrease in the total score achieved, (687 from 692 out of 1,000). Our implementation levels appear to be satisfactory, although further improvements are required. The highest score was attained in the business results and the lowest score in the people criteria. SAR Executive Summary IV

9 Summary of Key Outcomes in 2014 Our strategic direction achievement Our partnerships and support systems Our corporate values and culture of excellence implementation Our performance was sustained across the majority of results despite a few decreases indicated in specific areas. Extensive use of performance indicators confirmed an overall positive strategic achievement rate at 80% against our strategic and operational targets. Existing technical development partnerships were effectively maintained and new ones established, facilitating our sustainability and expansion in new markets; 80% of our qualifications are developed in partnership with governing bodies of sport and in consultation with other organisations. Innovative IT technology portfolio continues to be explored, successfully designed and improved to support our awarding function, and have shown increased use by our recognised centres. 99% of our stakeholder responses confirm that we operate in a fair and equitable manner, and we deliver professional services. 96% of our stakeholder responses confirm that we promote teamwork. 93% of our stakeholder responses we are open to learn and 97% of our stakeholders believe that we preserve a personal touch. 96% of stakeholder responses feel that we try to maintain a sense of humour and have fun. Satisfaction levels of our stakeholders (recognised centres, learners, partners, external verifiers, 1st4sport employees) Our external verification levels Our management of incidents 1 Table I. Key Performance Outcomes 94% of stakeholder responses confirm that we improve each year in meeting needs/expectations and provide value-added service. 99% of stakeholder responses confirm that we provide qualifications that are of value to each learner's career/role and therefore contribute to society. 99% of stakeholder responses confirm that we develop, deliver and award qualifications that meet the needs of end users (learners, centres, employers). 98% of learner responses confirm that each qualification adds value to their career/role pathway. Employees are generally satisfied with their current job at 1st4sport; most common areas of dissatisfaction are the limited career progression opportunities, employees involvement in relevant areas and empowerment to implement improvements/take initiatives, underdeveloped organisational culture and the quality of buildings/facilities which requires improvement. Feedback received from centres on external verification activity continues to be positive. Improved structure of the verification teams, full implementation of the CEV role and process optimisation supported by our IT systems (Athena), has led to improvements in this area. Achievement rate of the verification target (courses/cohorts being verified at a ratio of 1:6/1:75) remains high (72%). The number of incidents that have been managed in 2014 was the largest (76) in the last 7 years. Our designated trained staff and the optimisation of our incident and investigation management processes, supported by adequate web-based audit mechanisms, ensured all incidents were effectively and promptly managed to mitigate any potential risk and maintained. 1 Incident types include a sanction against a centre reported by an EV, learner appeal against the outcomes of their assessment by their centre, learner complaint against their centre, suspected learner misconduct, suspected non- by a centre, suspected child or vulnerable adult safeguarding issue by a centre, customer service complaint to 1st4sport from a centre, customer service complaint to 1st4sport from a learner, suspected non- by 1st4sport, suspected child or vulnerable adult safeguarding issue by 1st4sport, centre appeal against a 1st4sport procedural decision or learner appeal against a 1st4sport procedural decision. SAR Executive Summary V

10 Conclusion External drivers and industry trends influence awarding organisations future sustainability. Self-assessment has therefore become more imperative to provide an insight of our business performance. Overall, our trends in 2014 followed the decreasing trends in demand which are evident in the qualifications market after many years of continuous increase, partly due to the changes in the funding for specific qualifications. Despite the increased competition, decreased demand and the continuously evolving regulatory expectations we have successfully maintained our competitive positioning and our awarding status with regulators. Key partnerships, strategic developments, increased stakeholder satisfaction, innovation and process effectiveness were the main factors for this. As a result of the self-assessment process several strengths and areas for improvement were identified in our effort to achieve our business aims and continuous development. The identification of areas for improvement has led to the development of an improvement plan following the EFQM structure. The delay in the publication of the Ofqual Annual Qualifications Market Report (October 2015) to enable a comparison of our performance against other organisations within the market has considerably affected our ability to implement our improvement plan schedule. As a result, the final version of the self-assessment report was not published until November 2015; allowing only three months for it to be implemented during the calendar year. Therefore, a two-year implementation timetable has been set for the achievement of our improvement plan. Our improvement plan aims to ensure we are able to: Continue to increase our leaders and employees knowledge related to the EFQM criteria/quality standards to promote the culture of excellence. Adopt the Lean Leadership/Six Sigma approach and initiate practical problem solving sessions to drive organisational improvement. Revise the 1st4sport organisational structure ensuring employees roles and plans are aligned to the business direction and team s competencies increase performance levels. Set clear and specific strategic objectives and targets to enable innovation and creativity. Review the 1st4sport strategy to ensure targets include expansion to areas/qualifications which secure demand and are aligned to the organisational structure. Review areas of employee dissatisfaction and conduct of employee needs-analysis related on their role, with the ambition of creating an inspirational/creative working environment and improved organisational culture. Conduct a detailed evaluation of our technology portfolio and identify future needs; reduce customer dissatisfaction and operational deficiencies in relation to the use of two different awarding systems by integrating the functions of Athena and Parnassus. Our leadership and total quality management approaches and supporting interrelated systems have enabled us to sustain positive business results and maintain our awarding function via the implementation of our quality standards and a systematic strategic planning process which facilitates continuous improvements. Regardless of the limitations and given the availability of resources, the self-assessment has been a critical process in evaluating our performance and provided an insight into the levels of quality. It is therefore crucial that the outcomes of the self-assessment are communicated and improvement plan actions implemented. It is anticipated that maintenance of our strengths and the deployment of the improvement plan will enable us to sustain a competitive advantage and continue to work towards excellence in this challenging climate. Katerina Doutsiou Head of Business Excellence SAR Executive Summary VI

11 1 Introduction 1.1 Overview 1st4sport Qualifications is an awarding organisation recognised and regulated in England by the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation (Ofqual), who also regulate vocational qualifications in Northern Ireland. 1st4sport are further regulated in Wales by the Welsh Government and in Scotland by the Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA). We specialise in offering vocational and occupational qualifications to service the sport, physical activity and active leisure industry. We work in partnership with a variety of organisations, including Governing Bodies of Sport (GBS) and other organisations, to award qualifications across the following areas: coaching leadership spectator safety leisure operations and management education, training and functional skills sports volunteering first aid and injury management horse racing physical education and school sport using sport to tackle youth crime employee rights and responsibilities exercise and fitness multi-skills development the outdoors sports performance sport officiating 1st4sport Qualifications is a brand of Coachwise Ltd, the trading arm of the National Coaching Foundation (known as sports coach UK), the UK-registered charity leading the development of coaches and the coaching system in the UK. Any proceeds go directly back to sports coach UK, to help them develop and advance sport in the UK. 1st4sport Qualifications Mission Statement To provide the active leisure and learning industry with a quality-assured and cost-effective qualification awarding service. To ensure the continuous development and maintenance of our awarding function within a culture of excellence, we have established The 1st4sport Total Quality Management Approach. This approach is based upon the systematic deployment of the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) Excellence Model (2012), which involves implementation of the EFQM criteria set as our quality standards. To facilitate effective implementation of the approach, the quality standards are integrated within our strategic planning and common process framework, providing our organisation with a sustainable advantage in sectors in which we operate. This is achieved through effective performance management, which enables us to ensure our and organisational performance levels are monitored, managed and improved across all operations. SAR 2014 Page 1 of 153

12 1.2 Self-assessment Self-assessment, as the integral component of performance management is the effective technique, which contributes to systematic continuous improvement and indicates the current level of our performance. In addition to the EFQM model s deployment as our quality management model, we also use it to conduct self-assessment, on which evaluation and diagnostics are based, with further deployment to enhance our overall performance. Our self assessment includes a rigorous self-evaluation of our performance against the regulations to determine levels, also using the principles of the model. The fundamental purpose of the self-assessment is to support quality improvement and measure progress against our journey to excellence. Systematic application of the EFQM model contributes significantly towards our aspiration to become Recognised for Excellence and ultimately achieving the EFQM Excellence Award. Self-assessment provides vital information in relation to the progress made, strengths and weaknesses and the simultaneous identification of causes and areas for improvement. The process itself increases organisational learning, staff awareness and establishes the basis for appropriate decision making. To this end, self-assessment as an effective performance management technique enables us to: maintain and manage our awarding function in line with our quality standards measure our process effectiveness and business performance (financial and non-financial) provide the regulatory authorities with relevant information on an operational and level obtain feedback to establish stakeholder satisfaction levels conduct benchmarking and make relative comparisons develop quality-oriented processes seek opportunities in achieving improvement and leading the improvement process implement a regular strategic and planning process to enable continuous improvement and increase the overall performance and quality level. SAR 2014 Page 2 of 153

13 1.3 The Self-assessment Process The process of self-assessment is continuous in order to obtain improved results on an annual basis and sustainability over the years. It is considered as a holistic perspective, which delivers greater results and full potential. To support this, self-assessment is undertaken in line with a defined process to ensure the effectiveness and validity of results, as indicated in the process diagram. The self-assessment process Data generated Establish and communicate plan for selfassessment Plan produced and communicated Liaise with relevant personnel for the collation of performance measurement data Data collected Evaluate and assess performance against EFQM criteria Evaluation and assessment conducted Organise representation of performance results Quality Manager Quality Manager Quality Manager Quality Manager Performance results organised Produce annual self-assessment report using the established structure Report produced Forward selfassessment report to Senior Management Team for feedback Feedback obtained Review feedback and amend report (where required) Feedback reviewed Publish selfassessment report Self-assessment undertaken, outcomes published Quality Manager Quality Manager Quality Manager Quality Manager Diagram 1.1 Self-assessment process 1.4 The Self-assessment Report A number of quantitative and qualitative data collection tools are used to facilitate valid and reliable performance outcomes. Our performance is then evaluated and outcomes validated via the RADAR assessment and management tool, and the self-analysis matrix. The combination of approaches enables the triangulation and accuracy of outcomes and ensures that self-assessment is conducted against the breadth of our quality standards on a holistic and integrated perspective. Outcomes are published in the self-assessment report annually on completion of the self-assessment process and made available to all stakeholders. The structure of the self- assessment report is based on the EFQM model, which facilitates an integrated approach to striving for organisational excellence. Strengths, areas for improvements and the resultant improvement plan, in line with the EFQM model, conclude the report. SAR 2014 Page 3 of 153

14 2 Methodology 2.1 Performance Management To generate valid data and understand the cause and effect relationship of the results appropriate performance measurement mechanisms are systematically utilised in the methodical evaluation and management of our performance. Performance measurement as an established process enables the identification of trends and a thorough analysis of our achievements and deficiencies. Implementation of our performance measurement process is shown in diagram 2.1. The Performance Measurement Process Audit and evaluate regulatory Audit and evaluate strategic achievement Audit and evaluate plan of provision achievement Audit and evaluate partnership and consultancy effectiveness System ready for implementation Head of Quality Management Quality Manager Head of Qualification Development Head of Qualification Development Data generated Audit and evaluate stakeholder satisfaction Audit and evaluate qualification demand and awarding performance Audit and evaluate improvement plan achievement Audit and evaluate against industry benchmarks Quality Manager Quality Manager Quality Manager Head of Quality Management Diagram 2.1 Performance measurement process Our integrated performance measurement tools serve to maintain and increase the level of quality, leading to effective decision-making and future strategic planning. Upon successful implementation of our measurement tools and process performance, data and results are generated and utilised to conduct self-assessment, in line with the EFQM model. SAR 2014 Page 4 of 153

15 In evaluating our current management s and for the conduct of self-assessment a number of approaches data collection methods and tools (table 2.1) were utilised to obtain valid and reliable outcomes. Performance measurement tools and representation of outcomes Tools Outcomes Data collection method/source Data classification Type of analysis Representation Regulatory reports Education industry trends Ofqual report and SQA review Quantitative feedback Descriptive statistics chart/table 1st4sport key performance statistics Strategic direction analysis Self-evaluation against regulations Trends in CR/QAP statuses Trends in accredited qualifications Trends in course authorisations Trends in learner registrations Trends in learner certifications Trends in learner participation by gender Trends in learner participation by age Trends in learner participation by ethnicity Disability types in learner participation Trends in access arrangement requests Athena Quantitative feedback Comparisons of descriptive statistics Athena, Parnassus Quantitative feedback Comparisons of descriptive statistics Parnassus Quantitative feedback Comparisons of descriptive statistics Parnassus Quantitative feedback Comparisons of descriptive statistics Parnassus Quantitative feedback Comparisons of descriptive statistics Parnassus Quantitative feedback Comparisons of descriptive statistics Parnassus Quantitative feedback Comparisons of descriptive statistics Parnassus Quantitative feedback Comparisons of descriptive statistics Parnassus Quantitative feedback Comparisons of descriptive statistics Athena Quantitative feedback Comparisons of descriptive statistics Trends in incidents Athena Quantitative feedback Comparisons of descriptive statistics Achievement rate Compliance with regulations Athena, Parnassus, Formic, Maginus chart chart chart chart chart chart chart chart chart chart chart Quantitative feedback Descriptive statistics chart/table Regulatory requirements Quantitative feedback RADAR table SAR 2014 Page 5 of 153

16 Tools Outcomes Data collection method/source Data classification Type of analysis Representation Benchmarking Stakeholder satisfaction survey Comparison of best /performance metrics FAB scheme Qualitative feedback Descriptive statistics table Stakeholder satisfaction levels Formic Quantitative feedback Descriptive statistics chart Formic Qualitative feedback General inductive analysis(patton,1990) Learner evaluation form Learner satisfaction levels Formic, Cognos Quantitative feedback Descriptive statistics chart table Employee satisfaction questionnaire Employee satisfaction levels Survey Quantitative feedback Descriptive statistics chart Qualitative feedback Deductive Analysis table Feedback forum form EV satisfaction levels on CPD Formic Quantitative feedback Descriptive statistics chart/table Qualification specific performance statistics Variance in qualification demand Parnassus Quantitative feedback Descriptive statistics chart Analysis of enquiries Athena Quantitative feedback Descriptive statistics chart Analysis of incidents Athena Quantitative feedback Descriptive statistics chart Analysis of actions and recognised centre risk profile Athena Quantitative feedback Descriptive statistics chart/table Analysis of access arrangements Athena Quantitative feedback Descriptive statistics chart Table 2.1 Performance measurement tools and representation of outcomes In the collection, processing and analysis of the above set of data a number of IT systems and software are used as shown below: Athena the 1st4sport Quality Assurance System Parnassus - the 1st4sport Awarding Service System Cognos Reporting Software Maginus Stock, Sale and Management Software Formic Survey Design and Deployment Software. SAR 2014 Page 6 of 153

17 2.2 The EFQM Excellence Model Amongst the numerous management tools and techniques commonly used by organisations, the EFQM Excellence Model was selected as the most appropriate model, due its ability to provide a holistic view of the organisation. The model is therefore used as a quality management model, representing an overarching framework based on our needs and awarding function for developing sustainable excellence, but also as a self-assessment tool. The great benefit that can be obtained from the effective use of the model, which leads to sustainable success, is based on the three integrated components: The Fundamental Concepts of Excellence The EFQM Excellence Model RADAR logic Use of these three integrated components enables organisations of all sizes and from all sectors to compare themselves with the attributes, qualities and achievements of sustainable organisations and also ensures that management s form a coherent system that is continually improved and delivers the intended strategy for the organisation The Fundamental Concepts of Excellence The Fundamental Concepts of Excellence are the underlying principles and form the essential foundation for sustainable excellence. Used as the basis to describe the attributes of an excellent organisational culture they also serve as a common language for senior management. Figure 1.1 The Fundamental Concepts of Excellence SAR 2014 Page 7 of 153

18 2.2.2 The EFQM Model The EFQM model indicates the areas an organisation should focus on in order to improve performance and competitive positioning. The model represents a holistic view of quality concepts, which are required to be developed and linked to our processes to accomplish positive results. The model consists of nine assessment criteria and 32 sub-criteria, which comprise our quality standards. The dynamic nature of the model and a brief explanation of what the nine criteria represent within our organisation are shown in figure 2.2 and table 2.2. Figure 2.2 The EFQM Excellence Model (2012) Our decision to implement the EFQM and the quality standards was based upon its capacity to enhance performance and to provide consistent, valid and relevant performance results. Execution of the EFQM as a self assessment model: promotes sharing and dissemination of information on successfully deployed strategies and derived benefits facilitates in achieving quality improvements and can be used for benchmarking activity against other awarding bodies stimulates systematic self-assessment against the designed criteria and the market industry promotes consensus of our strengths and areas for improvement enables measurement of our progress, key developments and respective growth. SAR 2014 Page 8 of 153

19 EFQM enablers criteria and sub-criteria (1st4sport quality standards) 1 Leadership (how are our leaders/senior managers lead to develop a better organisation) 1a Leaders develop the mission, vision, values, and ethics and act as role models 1b Leaders define, monitor, review and drive the improvement of the organisation s management system and performance 1c Leaders engage with customers, partners and representatives of society 1d Leaders reinforce a culture of excellence with the organisation s people 1e Leaders ensure that the organisation is flexible and manages change effectively 2 Strategy (where the organisation is going and how it will get there) 2a Strategy is based on understanding the needs and expectations both stakeholders and the external environment ecological sustainability 2b Strategy is based on understanding internal performance and capabilities 2c Strategy and supporting policies are developed, reviewed and updated to ensure economic, societal and ecological sustainability 2d Strategy and supporting policies are communicated and deployed through plans, processes and objectives 3 People (how we manage our employees) 3a Peoples plans support the organisations strategy 3b Peoples knowledge and capabilities are developed 3c People are aligned, involved and empowered 3d People communicate effectively throughout the organisation 3e People are rewarded, recognised and cared for 4 Partnerships and Resources (how we make best use of what we have or need) 4a Partners and suppliers are managed for sustainable benefit 4b Finances are managed to secure sustained success 4c Buildings, equipment, materials and natural resources are managed in a sustainable way 4d Technology is managed to support the delivery of strategy 4e Information and knowledge are managed to support effective decision making and to build the organisational capability Processes, Products and Services (how we manage and improve what we do, how we ensure customer focus before and after our 5 product/service delivery 5a Processes are designed and managed to optimise stakeholder value 5b Products and services are developed to create optimum value for customers 5c Products and services are effectively promoted and marketed 5d Products and services are produced, delivered and managed 5e Customer relationships are managed and enhanced SAR 2014 Page 9 of 153

20 EFQM results criteria and sub-criteria (1st4sport quality standards) 6 Customer Results (are our customers satisfied and want to continue to do business with us) 6a Perceptions 6b Performance Indicators 7 People Results (are our employees satisfied) 7a Perceptions 7b Performance Indicators 8 Society Results (how do we ensure with regulations and contribute to the society; what do they think of us) 8a Perceptions 8b Performance Indicators 9 Business results (are we achieving as much as we could to ensure our sustainability) 9a Business Outcomes 9b Business Performance Indicators Table 2.2 EFQM criteria and sub-criteria (1st4sport quality standards) The nine structured assessment criteria enable the analysis of the cause and effect relationship between what the organisation does and the results to be achieved. As shown in table 2.1 five of these criteria act as 'Enablers' and four as 'Results'. The 'Enabler' criteria cover what we do as an organisation and the way we do it whilst the 'Results' criteria cover what we should be working towards to achieve. Each of the nine criteria has a definition, which describes what each criterion involves. To develop the high level meaning further, each criterion is supported by sub-criteria. The RADAR tool facilitates the assessment and scoring of the level of each sub-criterion. Therefore, to ensure that benefits are obtained from the effective application of the model, the components of the fundamental concepts of excellence and the RADAR logic were utilised across the 32 sub-criteria to conduct self-assessment, ensuring a multidimensional approach. SAR 2014 Page 10 of 153

21 2.2.3 The RADAR logic The third component, the RADAR logic as shown in Figure 2.3, is a dynamic assessment framework and powerful management tool, which provides the backbone to support an organisation. Due to the particular design and structure, it enables the identification of strengths and areas for improvement, using a structured and logical approach to assess the organisational performance. The RADAR supports the scoring mechanism behind the EFQM Excellence Award and other recognition/assessment schemes, and can help to lead change and manage improvement projects. Figure 2.3 The RADAR logic Most importantly, the RADAR is an integral tool of the EFQM model which was used to assess and manage performance and indicate our level of excellence against the nine criteria and 32 sub-criteria of the model. RADAR ensures that diagnosis is based on an objective and analytical approach to determine the relative progress made each year. SAR 2014 Page 11 of 153

22 Using the evidence generated from the breadth of our established performance measurement tools the RADAR scale was applied to assess each approach, which reflects the overall score. This in turn, makes the identification of strengths and required improvements required easier. In addition, it allows comparisons on our performance over the years, as well as on results achieved by other organisations regardless of the type of activity or sector who implement the EFQM model. The RADAR tool has been implemented for the last five consecutive years in the conduct of the self-assessment, however as the EFQM model was revised in 2010 and again in 2012, the updated RADAR scoring matrix and weighting criteria have slightly changed, therefore results are treated with caution when making comparisons. The RADAR logic comprises of the following four elements; Results, Approach, Deployment, Assessment and Refinement. In using the RADAR logic we reviewed whether we: Determine the Results we aim for as part of our strategy (scope/integrity/segmentation/trends/targets/comparisons/causes) Plan and develop integrated set of sound Approaches (arrangements, processes, etc.) to deliver the required results Deploy our approaches in a structured way to ensure implementation Assess and Refine our deployed approaches based on monitoring and analysis of the results achieved and ongoing learning activities. These elements represent our quality indicators used for the identification of performance levels and subsequent improvement plan. The use of the RADAR approach and related quality indicators determine the score, which reflects the level of performance and quality levels, achieved. The score contributes to the decision-making of the relevant actions, which form an improvement plan for each year. The application of RADAR enables an evaluation of performance levels across different operational areas to be conducted and provides justification for the outcomes. However, as with every method RADAR entails some limitations. The RADAR does not evidently reflect the causal relationship interpretation between the methods used and the results obtained. It requires thorough analysis and multidimensional feedback via the conduct of workshops and related consensus meetings to validate the outcomes. There is a high risk of subjectivity when this method is used by a single individual or assessor and validity of score could be questioned. To ensure that the assessor s subjectivity is limited a consensus meeting was conducted following sufficient training, which served to increase the effort of our journey to excellence by expanding the methods applied and validating the outcomes thoroughly. SAR 2014 Page 12 of 153

23 A representation of the way the RADAR logic and principles were applied is summarised in the RADAR scoring matrix. The score evidence sourced from the performance measurement tools was assessed in line with the RADAR scoring matrix to identify our current performance level against each sub criterion. Structured diagnosis and methodical assessment of available evidence was conducted using a scoring scale of 0% - 100%. The scores resulting from the assessment of the nine elements (five Enabler criteria and four Results criteria) were added together to make up the overall score for the specific year. The RADAR tool for Enablers Approach Guidance Unable to Limited ability to Able to Fully able to Recognised as Global Role Model Sound The approaches have a clear rationale, based on the relevant stakeholder needs, and are process based. Integrated The approaches support strategy and are linked to other approaches as appropriate. Deployment Implemented Structured The approaches are implemented in relevant areas, in a timely manner. The execution is structured and enables flexibility and organisational agility. Assessment and Refinement Measurement The effectiveness and efficiency of the approaches and their deployment are appropriately measured. Learning & Creativity Improvement & Innovation Learning and creativity is used to generate opportunities for improvement or innovation. Outputs from measurement, learning and creativity are used to evaluate, prioritise and implement improvements and innovations. Scale 0% 25% 50% 75% 100% Overall Score SAR 2014 Page 13 of 153

24 The RADAR tool for Results Relevance & Usability Scope & Relevance Integrity Guidance A coherent set of results, including key results, are identified that the performance of the organisation in terms of its strategy, objectives and the needs and expectations of the relevant stakeholders. Results are timely, reliable and accurate. Unable to Limited ability to Able to Fully able to Recognised as Global Role Model Segmentation Results are properly segmented to provide meaningful insights. Performance Trends Positive trends or sustained good performance over at least 3 years. Targets Comparisons Confidence Relevant targets are set and consistently achieved for the key results, in line with the strategic goals. Relevant external comparisons are made and are favourable for the key results, in line with the strategic goals. There is confidence that performance levels will be sustained into the future, based on established cause & effect relationships. Scale 0% 25% 50% 75% 100% Overall Score Regardless of the limitations, RADAR was used to enhance the integration between the implementation of the model/quality standards and reporting of the performance levels via self-assessment. Primarily, we strive to increase the effort on our journey to excellence by expanding the methods applied and validating the outcomes thoroughly to ensure a coherent system is continually improved and delivers the intended strategy. SAR 2014 Page 14 of 153

25 2.3 Self-assessment validation approaches A number of approaches are available for the conduct of self-assessment or can be used to support and triangulate the RADAR outcomes. However, there is no distinguished approach, each delivers different benefits and requires alternative resources. Approaches are recognised as successful when they suit the corporate culture and used to foster participation. In assessing our performance against the EFQM criteria the self-analysis matrix and workshop were identified as the most appropriate selfassessment approaches. Critical factors with regards to the potential success of each approach to self-assessment via the EFQM model were considered prior to any decision-making. This was primarily based on the resource availability/requirements and the accuracy of the selfassessment approach. Evaluation of these factors can assist the identification of the deliverables of each approach. Key factors that have affected the benefits and/or limitations of the approach were analysed and identified as below: limited engagement from senior management team time restrictions availability/compatibility of information systems and data finance and related costs training of allocated personnel corporate culture and current quality management/maturity level. Selected approaches must therefore be adapted to the organisation s needs and maturity level to meet the specific requirements, within the several boundaries of the conduct of self-assessment The self-analysis matrix as the selected validation approach In using the tailored matrix the RADAR outcomes were triangulated and validated, therefore ensuring an accurate evaluation of our performance levels across different operational areas together with a rationale for the outcomes. The self-analysis matrix was primarily selected due to its transparent and practical features in determining the current level of performance punctually. The matrix is one of the quickest and easiest approaches used by all employees. It represents the practical step for introducing self-assessment and at the same time is the simplest method to administer. It requires minimal training and provides a visual gap analysis to address the strengths and areas for improvement. Furthermore, it is a means of involving everyone in the self-assessment process and supports team discussion. The matrix approach can be used at any level with linkages to wider target setting, providing a view of our progress. Extensive analysis of the identified approaches against the training, time limitations and the development level supported that the matrix approach is the most advantageous to ensure our corporate facets and culture are appropriately explored. The self-analysis matrix is a pre-validated evaluation tool, which provides a score towards the EFQM criteria and enables the assessment of the organisation s relevant areas. The development of the tailored matrix was based on the UK North West Quality Award Model organisational self-analysis matrix. It consists of statements of achievements per criterion, which describe different levels of performance ranging between a number of points on a scale of 1-10, results of which are presented in section 3.3 EFQM self-analysis matrix responses of this report. SAR 2014 Page 15 of 153

26 The matrix has been used for the last seven consecutive years with a few changes in the statements to reflect the revised version of the EFQM model in 2012 and to provide an insight on our performance levels and related sustainability. The statements developed by our selfassessment team were adapted to increase respondents understanding ensuring they were specific to the awarding function without deviating from the standard matrix concepts, maintaining the validity of the score. The statements were subsequently piloted with respondents to facilitate face validity and with the Quality Management Team for content validity. Prior to the completion of the matrix, 1st4sport employees received training on the linkage between the matrix and the EFQM model in order to identify the statement, which on their opinion best reflects the current level of our performance. The practical format, transparency and range of statements enabled the respondent to identify quickly and easily the level of the organisation. Resultant of this, an insight into our performance levels were provided, based on an overall score. The matrix score was then compared to the RADAR score. The statements refer to specific s and processes which could provide a checklist to identify areas for improvement. Despite the fact that the structural range of statements facilitates the identification of improvement levels, it does not evidently reflect the identification of strengths and areas for improvement. As every organisation and their respective statements are different, it is difficult to make comparisons with the industry average using benchmarks of the scores achieved. Where this approach is to be used in conjunction with the RADAR and the workshop approach, these limitations are significantly reduced The workshop as the selected validation approach Precautions were taken to preserve the validity of the matrix score and limit the risk of subjectivity; hence the workshop was selected as an additional approach to validate the matrix results via the conduct of a consensus meeting to establish the RADAR score. As a developing organisation aiming to apply for the EFQM recognition scheme in the future, we made increased efforts to ensure validity. The workshop approach consists of five distinct phases of training, data collection, scoring workshop, prioritisation of improvement actions and review of progress. Following the process of data collection and training the self-assessment team conducted the scoring workshop. Subsequently a second scoring workshop took place, where the senior management team reviewed the score to reach a consensus and agree on strengths and areas for improvement required. The significance of this process lies in active involvement and in the development of team-working environment. This also helps to limit the degree of subjectivity when assessment is conducted by a single assessor. As with every approach, it has risks, such as the requirement for assessors to be trained/qualified or providing unrealistic and un-objective assessment resulting in possibly over-generous and inaccurate scoring. However, there are considerable benefits; the process itself increases organisational awareness, creativity and innovation and enables problem solving based on the opportunity for thorough analysis, discussion and effective communication. The workshop approach helps to identify gaps and allows the organisation to take preventive and corrective action to redress deficiencies. Most importantly, it enables benchmarks to be established, which could be compared to other organisations that use the RADAR scoring system when self-assessing against the EFQM model. Based on the aforementioned benefits it was decided that the workshop approach will not only become a standard approach for self-assessment, but also an integral part of our effort for continuous improvement and excellence. SAR 2014 Page 16 of 153

27 2.4 Type of Analysis As a result of the use of established performance measurement tools quantitative and qualitative data was generated. Analysis of descriptive statistics and inductive thematic analysis were the two main data analysis methods, which were used as appropriate to enable accurate treatment of data and validation of results. a) Descriptive statistics: present the main features of a collection of quantitative data with the aim of summarising a data set. Representation of descriptive statistics via graphic visuals provided an overview of simple summaries about the sample and the measures hence forming the basis of the quantitative analysis. Due to organisational needs and time constraints descriptive statistics are used as opposed to conducting an analysis on the basis of probability theory. Despite the risk of misrepresenting the original data or failing to see key detail, when describing a large set of observations with a single indicator, descriptive statistics provide a powerful summary that may enable comparisons across measures. This approach is not only broadly used and simple but also meets our objective of analysing and presenting statistics in an efficient and comprehensive way. b) General inductive analysis: involves a process designed to condense raw qualitative data into categories or themes based on valid inference and interpretation. It is considered as a "bottom up" approach, moving from specific observations to broader generalizations and theories. This means that the patterns, themes, and categories of analysis "emerge out of the data rather than being imposed on them prior to data collection and analysis" (Patton, 1990). The rationale for using this approach for the analysis of qualitative data was to explore the usage of words/indicators, which resulted from the data collection methods, in an inductive manner and code them into relevant categories to establish a clear link between raw data and key findings. The outcome from the inductive analysis of raw data was the development of key themes/categories into a summative format, which led to the clear identification of strengths and areas for improvement. 2.5 Treatment of data, evidence and identification of trends A number of different sources, data collection methods and performance measurement tools were used to obtain and analyse qualitative and quantitative data, as presented in table 2.2. To enhance the validity, reliability and objectivity of outcomes a number of approaches were used and efforts made to ensure triangulation of the EFQM score and relevant outcomes. Upon completion of the treatment of data and identification of trends, the RADAR method of evaluating performance against the nine criteria and 32 sub-criteria of the EFQM model, which represent our quality standards, was applied and then compared with the score generated from the implementation of the self-analysis matrix. In addition, the workshop approach was also used to reach consensus on the RADAR score and to further increase the validity of outcomes. Despite the proactive approaches adopted throughout the self-assessment and the actions taken to ascertain the validity of results, the data should be treated with caution. SAR 2014 Page 17 of 153

28 The combination of methods used ensure triangulation of results and increase the validity of the score, which enabled an accurate evaluation of our performance levels across different operational areas, together with a rationale for the outcomes. Evidence for the evaluation of our performance was only used if it met the following criteria: valid to enable relevant and accurate results current relating to the past three to five years to enable comparisons and developing trends verifiable confirmed by accompanied documentation and statistics authentic resulting from valid sources and not being amended/manipulated. In some cases data represents individuals perceptions that may vary and deviate from the pragmatic state. At other times the data provides an indicative overview rather than an indisputable fact. The availability of data, based on the time of collection might also affect the validity of results. In light of the above, conclusions and identification of trends have been reached after careful consideration of impacted factors, to avoid misinterpretations and misuse of data. The increased use of IT-based system measurement tools has helped to minimise areas where perceptual data was the only source of evidence. Evidence generated via the deployment of IT-based systems has significantly increased the validity of results and associated conclusions. Despite the fact that the type of collection methods and evidence generated is integrated into our mission, strategy and intended results using a consistent structure, external factors and internal organisational changes in certain areas made comparisons of results and identification of trends difficult. As with every case of data analysis and statistical results conclusions are reached after careful consideration of the cause and effect relationship accompanied by reasoning. 3. Results The purpose of this section is to present results from the established performance measurement and self-assessment tools. As we are a developing organisation that is continuing on the excellence journey, the RADAR assessment tool, in conjunction with the matrix and workshop validation approaches, were used to: evaluate the implementation of our quality standards indicate results of our performance for each sub-criterion of the EFQM reach consensus to determine the final score and our excellence level with regards to the EFQM. The RADAR and self-analysis matrix scores are slightly different, which can be explained easily due to the nature of the two methods; the selfanalysis matrix outcomes are based on peoples perceptions whilst the RADAR results are based on evaluation of factual evidence across the breadth of our performance measurement data and as a result of our consensus meeting. Despite the fact that the individual and total score might be to some extent different, trends in the scoring between the nine criteria are similar, which confirms the effective validation and triangulation of outcomes resulting from the methods used. SAR 2014 Page 18 of 153

29 3.1 Weighting of EFQM Criteria In assessing our performance in line with the EFQM model the RADAR scoring matrix was used to determine the overall score. Based on the dynamic nature of the model different weights are given to each of the nine criteria. These weights were established in 1991 and were revised in 2012 as a result of a wide consultation exercise across Europe. With the exception of Customer results and Business results, whose weighting factor is 15% the remaining seven criteria have an equal weighting factor of 10%. Generally, each sub-criterion is allocated equal weight within that criterion, for example 1a attracts 20% of the points allocated to criterion 1. The two exceptions are criteria part 6a and 7a, which take 75% each whilst criterion part 6b and 7b take 25% of the points allocated for each criterion. The revised criteria and related weighting factors have affected the comparison of results from previous years. The revised scoring system (2012) has been applied to the past years results to enable comparison. In doing so, careful consideration of the differentiation of the revised criteria was taken when trying to establish trends as the validity of data is affected. Enablers Results 3. People 7. People Results 10% 10% 1. Leadership 10% 2. Strategy 10% 5. Processes, Products & Services 10% 6. Customer Results 15% 9. Business Results 15% 4. Partnerships & Resources 8. Society Results 10% 10% Learning, Creativity and Innovation Figure 3.1 The EFQM Excellence model revised weighting criteria (2012) SAR 2014 Page 19 of 153

30 3.2 Analysis and representation of the EFQM scoring results The detailed score of our performance against the 32 sub-criteria of the EFQM model, which has derived from the evidence collected, analysed and assessed is not presented in this report due to the large amount of information, but is available upon request. The scoring summary against the nine criteria, presented in table 3.1, which shows how the individual scores resulted for each criterion based on the different weighting factors. The score achieved for each element is based on the evaluation of our performance against each sub-criterion, aligned to the relevant attributes, using a scale from 0% to 100%. The sum of each sub-criterion (divided by the number of sub-criteria) shows the score for the specific criterion, which is then multiplied by the relevant weighting factor to obtain the final score achieved on a scale of points. In order to achieve favourable outcomes we implement the EFQM to benefit from the dynamics of the model via the integration of enablers and results. Therefore, analysis and discussion of the outcomes is split into two parts; enablers (the leading indicators) and results (lagging indicators). This relationship shows the overall integration of the nine criteria within the model. The score of each criterion shown in the following pages is not the average of the sub-criteria; it is final criterion total after the weighting factor has been applied. The integration starts with the development of customer orientation, which is defined in the strategy (criterion 2) and is implemented throughout the organisation via a systematic deployment. Leadership (criterion 1) ensure effective integrated approaches are deployed to work towards this customer orientation. To achieve this, leaders establish valuable partnerships and make sufficient resources (criterion 4) and employees (criterion 3) available. Customer orientation is then supported by the development and implementation of processes (criterion 5). As presented in the RADAR assessment tool the fundamental elements of enablers and results are evaluated against the respective attributes based on the sufficiency and availability of evidence via the utilisation of numerous methods to obtain sources/data. Where low scores are attained this is usually due to lack of evidence to support the deployment, learning and benchmarking activities across the industry. The analysis of the self-assessment outcomes and particular structure of the discussion provides a view of the cause and effect linkage between enablers and results. In terms of enablers (criteria 1-5) evaluation of current approaches is undertaken based on the attributes of being sound, integrated, implemented, structured, and subject to measurement to ensure learning and creativity and improvement and innovation. The term approach is used to describe any procedures, processes, methods, tools, arrangements, etc. that are in place and show how we aim to operate in line with our quality standards, deliver efficiency and achieve the anticipated levels of excellence. Similarly, analysis and discussion of the results (criteria 6-9) is based on the grounds of positive trends, appropriate targets, comparisons, confidence, causes, scope and relevance, integrity and segmentation. According to our Mission our ultimate purpose is to provide the active leisure and learning industry with a quality-assured and cost-effective qualification awarding service. On this basis, we endeavour to achieve the maximum customer satisfaction levels, to ensure a customer oriented focus. Evaluation outcomes suggest that we have been successful in achieving our mission this year. SAR 2014 Page 20 of 153

31 RADAR scoring sheet (2014) Enablers Criteria 1. Leadership 2. Strategy 3. People 4. Partnerships & Resources 5. Processes, Products & Services Criterion Number 1 Score 2 Score 3 Score 4 Score 5 Score Criterion Part 1a 53 2a 72 3a 53 4a 74 5a 74 Criterion Part 1b 73 2b 73 3b 59 4b 64 5b 75 Criterion Part 1c 74 2c 66 3c 44 4c 55 5c 76 Criterion Part 1d 49 2d 63 3d 55 4d 85 5d 74 Criterion Part 1e 52 3e 51 4e 79 5e 76 Sum of Parts Divided by the number of criteria Score awarded for enablers Results Criteria 6. Customer Results 7. People Results 8. Society Results 9. Business Results Criterion Number 6 Score Factor Final 7 Score Factor Final 8 Score Factor Final 9 Score Factor Final Criterion Part 6a = 58 7a = 40 8a = 35 9a = 39.5 Criterion Part 6b = 20 7b = 13 8b = b = 39.5 Score awarded Calculation of Total Points Final Score Criteria Score Awarded Weighting Points Awarded 1. Leadership Strategy People Partnerships and Resources Processes, Products & Services Customer Results People Results Society Results Business Results Total points awarded 687 Table 3.1 RADAR scoring summary for the 32 sub-criteria SAR 2014 Page 21 of 153

32 Score The highest scores identified via the RADAR this year was achieved in Customer results and Business result. This is due to developments made over the past few years and also the higher weighing factors used for these criteria. Evaluation outcomes showed that the lowest score was achieved in People enabler and People results criteria, areas where improvements are required Leadership Strategy People Partnerships and Resources 52 EFQM RADAR score (2014) Processes, Products & Services 117 Customer Results 53 People Results Society Results Business Results Chart 3.1 Representation of the RADAR score per criterion (2014) EFQM Criteria In evaluating sustainability of our performance and associated trends it was deemed essential to compare the results with previous years. An increased score is evident only the criterion of Society Results. The score across the majority of the criteria remained the same or slightly decreased. As the criteria and their weighting have been revised the scores achieved in 2009 and 2010 were recalculated using the revised RADAR scoring matrix to enable an indicative comparison. RADAR score (comparison and recalculation of previous years results using the revised weighting EFQM model 2013 version) Criteria Score Factor Score (2014) Score (2013) Score (2012) Score (2011) Score (2010) Score (2009) 1. Leadership Strategy People Partnerships and Resources Processes, Products & Services Customer Results People Results Society Results Business Results Total Table 3.2 Indicative comparison of the recalculated RADAR scores based on the revised criteria SAR 2014 Page 22 of 153

33 Score 3.3 EFQM self-analysis matrix responses and score The tailored self-analysis matrix approach has been used for the past seven years and was identified as the quickest and easiest method for our employees to evaluate our organisational performance. Members of the Coachwise Executive Management Team (EMT) (5 respondents of the total 22) also completed the matrix. Raw data and responses per criterion are not presented in this report due to the large amount of information, but are available upon request. Analysis of the responses determined the score for each EFQM criterion Self-analysis matrix score (2014) Leadership Strategy People Partnerships & Resources Processes, Products & Services Customer Results People Results Society Results Business Results EFQM Criteria Chart 3.3 Representation of the self-analysis matrix score per criterion based on the revised weighting factors of the EFQM model As in the case of the RADAR s score comparison, careful consideration was taken in recalculating the results between based on the revised criteria and weighting. The data and associated trends (table 3.3) should be treated in caution, as the recalculated scores provide an indicative comparison. Before the recalculation the totals achieved were slightly higher (506 in 2009 and 513 in 2010). Self-analysis matrix score (comparison and recalculation of previous years results using the revised weighting) Criteria Score Factor Score (2014) Score (2013) Score (2012) Score (2011) Score (2010) Score (2009) 1. Leadership 5.2 x Strategy 4.5 x People 4.9 x Partnerships and Resources 5.6 x Processes, Products & Services 6.2 x Customer Results 6.4 x People Results 5.5 x Society Results 6.3 x Business Results 6.0 x Total Table 3.3 Self-analysis matrix score for 2014 and indicative comparison of the recalculated scores ( ) SAR 2014 Page 23 of 153

34 Score Comparison of RADAR and Matrix scores (2014) RADAR score Matrix score 20 0 Leadership Strategy People Partnerships and Resources Processes, Products & Services Customer Results People Results Society Results Business Results EFQM Criteria Chart 3.3 Comparison of scores awarded from the RADAR and the self-analysis matrix per criterion Despite the fact that the individual score against some criteria and the total score might be to some extent different, trends in the scoring between the nine criteria are similar. Differences in the scoring between the RADAR and the matrix were anticipated due to the nature of the evaluation methods; the scoring from the self-analysis matrix uses perceptual data whilst the RADAR results are based on evaluation of factual evidence across the breadth of our performance measurement data and the workshop undertaken. SAR 2014 Page 24 of 153

35 1. Leadership 3.4 Synopsis of EFQM Results Results from the evaluation against the implementation of our quality standards and performance levels are presented in this section. On a global scale outcomes were positive, with some upward trends identified and improvements made to performance and provision of service. As a result of the self-assessment process several strengths and areas for improvement were identified. Use of the RADAR assessment tool and self-analysis matrix provided an indication of our performance levels with an emphasis on strategic achievement rate and deployment of quality standards to ensure with regulations. Analysis of the outcomes provided an understanding of the cause and effect relationship between enablers (current 1st4sport arrangements, processes etc.) and results. The identification of areas for improvement has led to the development of an improvement plan following the EFQM structure. Detailed actions, priority levels and ownership are attached to each action with an implementation target date and required resources to make the implementation easier. This enables teams and individuals to complete each action, managed through the Governance section of Athena. For the purpose of this report only a summary of the Improvement Plan is provided. Improvement Plan Summary EFQM EFQM Sub Criterion Criterion 1a. Leaders develop the mission, vision, values, and ethics and act as role models 1b. Leaders define, monitor, review and drive the improvement of the organisation's management system and performance 1c. Leaders engage with customers, partners and representatives of society 1d. Leaders reinforce a culture of excellence with the organisation's people 1e. Leaders ensure that the organisation is flexible and manages change effectively Score Assessment scale outcome 50% Able to 75% Fully able to 75% Fully able to 50% Able to 50% Able to Strengths None at this time Development of performance measurement tool (Athena - Governance) to provide a balanced set results, which leaders use for decision making when defining, monitoring, reviewing and driving improvement of the organisation's management system and performance. Established industry network resultant of leaders' active involvement across stakeholders. None at this time Web based tool (Athena - Change Management) developed to manage change systematically. Areas for improvement Leaders to attend best in leadership training, to increase awareness on innovative ways on how to act as role models to support the shared leadership culture. Adopt Lean Leadership/Six Sigma approach to drive organisational improvement. None at this time. Increase EFQM awareness through the deployment of the internal EFQM marketing campaign (business focus and posters). Integrate the web based tool (Athena - Change Management) developed to manage change systematically with other established approaches. SAR 2014 Page 25 of 153

36 3. People 2. Strategy EFQM Criterion EFQM Sub Criterion 2a. Strategy is based on understanding the needs and expectations both stakeholders and the external environment ecological sustainability 2b. Strategy is based on understanding internal performance and capabilities 2c. Strategy and supporting policies are developed, reviewed and updated 2d. Strategy and supporting policies are communicated, implemented and monitored 3a. Peoples' plans support the organisations strategy 3b. Peoples' knowledge and capabilities are developed 3c. People are aligned, involved and empowered 3d. People communicate effectively throughout the organisation 3e. People are rewarded, recognised and cared for Score Assessment scale outcome 75% Fully able to 75% Fully able to 75% Fully able to 50% Able to 50% Able to 50% Able to 50% Able to 50% Able to 50% Able to Strengths Analysis of internal and external indicators to inform strategic planning to minimise the impact of regulatory, political and legal change. Effective performance measurement tools in place to generate valid information on internal performance levels and capabilities. Strategy is integrated and supported by clearly designed processes via the Common Process Framework (via Control). Strategy is integrated and supported by clearly designed processes via the Common Process Framework (via Control). None at this time. None at this time. None at this time. Automated IT notification tools support process based activities, initiating action for employees and EVs. Benefits package. Areas for improvement None at this time. Review strategy to ensure targets include expansion to areas/qualifications which secure demand Continue to explore new technology to ensure we respond to stakeholders needs. Review strategic direction developing global targets which are aligned to and executed across the organisational structure. Set clear and specific objectives and targets to enable innovation and creativity. Revise organisational structure ensuring employees roles and plans are aligned to the business direction. Deploy the revised organisational structure; ensuring employees are effectively orientated into their revised roles in order to maximise their contribution. Initiate the practical problem solving (PPS) sessions to empower employees; increasing participation, innovation and creativity. Distribute e-bulletins (to partners, centres, EVs) instead of newsletters to improve communication methods. Establish working groups to improve communication channels internally. Initiate employee recognition scheme via Business Focus. SAR 2014 Page 26 of 153

37 4. Partnerships and Resources EFQM Criterion EFQM Sub Criterion 4a. Partners and suppliers are managed for sustainable benefit Score Assessment scale outcome 75% Fully able to Strengths Well established qualification development partnerships with governing bodies of sport and other technical partners provide extensive expertise to support the development, delivery and awarding of qualifications in current and new markets. Areas for improvement Revise the partnership approach to ensure sustainable mutual benefits. 4b. Finances are managed to secure sustained success 4c. Buildings, equipment, materials and natural resources are managed in a sustainable way 4d. Technology is managed to support the delivery of strategy 4e. Information and knowledge are managed to support effective decision making and to build the organisational capability 75% Fully able to 50% Able to 75% Fully able to 75% Fully able to Following internal policy and maintaining with current financial reporting legislation. None at this time. Ability to respond swiftly to change via the use of enhanced IT portfolio. Deployment of systematic validation of Unique Learner Number (ULN) and upload to the Personal Learner Record, as opposed to manual s by the majority of AOs. Effective data collection and transformation into information/knowledge, which is shared via innovative IT solutions. Significant business process decisions should be consulted on across all departments prior to implementation. The business should be more responsive to, and considerate of, policy and process changes implemented by the Finance department. Minimise the use of paper and create office space through the development of a streamlined technology portfolio Integrate 1st4sport QA and Awarding systems to increase stakeholder satisfaction and operational effectiveness. Deploy e-learning and e-assessment mechanisms to respond to demand. None at this time. SAR 2014 Page 27 of 153

38 6. Customer Results 5. Processes, Products and Services EFQM Criterion EFQM Sub Criterion 5a. Processes are designed and managed to optimise stakeholder value Score Assessment scale outcome 75% Fully able to Strengths Processes are developed and managed using an innovative approach (Control) to establish and manage the Common Process Framework. Areas for improvement Ensure continuous updates of the Common Process Framework. 5b. Products and services are developed to create optimum value for customers 5c. Products and services are effectively promoted and marketed 75% Fully able to 75% Fully able to Qualification packages continue to ensure leadership status in the industry and remain our unique selling point. Extensive partner network ensure targeted marketing approach in line with customer segmentation. Initiate competitor analyses to increase innovation, improve products and create optimum value for customers. Improve speed, responsiveness, functionality and design of 1st4sport website. 5d. Products and services are produced, delivered and managed 75% Fully able to Effective supply chain on site for the development, dispatch and awarding of products. Conduct internal audits (quality checks) on specific areas where gaps/issues are identified to minimise deficiencies. 5e. Customer relationships are managed and enhanced 75% Fully able to 6a. Perceptions 75% Fully able to Strong relationships with key customers. Positive perceptions on 1st4sport s capability to ensure each qualification adds value to the career/role pathway of learners. Consider employers as the ultimate customers; initiating consultations throughout the development, delivery and after the awarding of qualifications. Reduce customer dissatisfaction in relation to the use of two different awarding systems by integrating the functions of Athena and Parnassus. 6b. Performance Indicators 75% Fully able to Positive perceptions on 1st4sport s reputation and image within the education industry. None at this time. SAR 2014 Page 28 of 153

39 9. Business results 8. Society Results 7. People Results EFQM Criterion EFQM Sub Criterion Score scale Assessment outcome 7a. Perceptions 50% Able to 7b. Performance Indicators 50% Able to 8a. Perceptions 75% Fully able to 8b. Performance Indicators 75% Fully able to Strengths Revised EQA structure increased satisfaction of the EV workforce. Employees are provided with sufficient training to undertake their role effectively. Positive perceptions on 1st4sport s capability to embrace ethical, environmental, legal and regulatory responsibility throughout its activities. Compliance status is maintained across regulators. Audit outcomes show levels above average across other AOs. Areas for improvement Recommend that the appraisal process is less subjective and that the organisation explores innovated management techniques Recommend that career development, pay scales and job descriptions are reviewed Improve morale, proactivity and recogniton of staff through practical problems solving sessions Use lean leadership activities to solve human resource issues. Increase the opportunities for employees further learning, development and career growth Improve the quality of building/facilities Develop the organisational culture and working environment None at this time. Conduct research activities to evaluate participation trends and inclusion across our qualifications 9a. Perceptions 75% Fully able to 9b. Performance Indicators 75% Fully able to Positive perceptions on 1st4sport s capability to ensure the development and maintenance of effective business relationships with its stakeholders, resulting in business loyalty. Competitive position maintained in the industry (being the third largest AO in terms of achievements in sector 8, ranked 25th of the 166 AOs recording achievements on other qualifications). Research, benchmarking and competitor analyses must be prioritised in the design and review of qualifications. The outcomes must be used to ensure a demand led approach ensuring fit for purpose qualification packages which meet employer and industry needs. Conduct research and use valid data for learner demand prediction Redesign performance mechanisms to obtain valid data when measuring specific target. SAR 2014 Page 29 of 153

40 3.5 Limitations of the self-assessment process and future recommendations (reflective ) Limitations Timescales of the publication of Ofqual s annual market qualification report Training and involvement of relevant team leaders in the RADAR consensus Involvement of key stakeholders Availability of valid evidence Review and analysis of the annual qualifications market s report information published by Ofqual is an essential part of the self-assessment process. Ofqual published their report in October 2015, which has had a substantial impact on the comparative analysis of key statistics and subsequent timescales for the completion of the self-assessment report. This also impacts significantly on the timely implementation of the improvement plan, the strategic linkages/required updates and respective business plans. As a result, our self-assessment process and operational timescales for completion and publication have been reviewed and rescheduled. However, this still does not allow sufficient time for implementation of the improvement plan and self-assessment outcomes may not be timely when reflecting performance levels of nearly a year and half ago. A consensus meeting was undertaken, as part of the RADAR approach, which involved the strategic management team as opposed to two members of the self-assessment team. This contributed to increased score validity and a more objective scope of evidence being assessed, helping to reduce the risks of subjectivity resultant of a single assessor conducting the RADAR evaluation. Yet, additional training on the EFQM and RADAR principles will be beneficial for the strategic management team members to ensure the rationale for the score reflects the current performance level. Were representatives from other departments trained on the EFQM and RADAR principles and involved in the consensus to assess their relevant areas the score might have been slightly different. Organisational awareness and time constraints contributed to this limitation. Members of the Executive Management Team were involved in the self-analysis matrix and employee satisfaction survey, which made results more valid. However, not all members actively engaged with the questionnaire completion process, resulting in delays in the processing of results. Furthermore, external verifiers were not invited to respond to the employee satisfaction survey. Process change, continuous redevelopments and system enhancements in our performance measurement tools affected the analysis and availability of data. In some occasions this has caused significant delays, made the identification of trends difficult but also enabled the identification of discrepancies in the data generated in previous years. Lack of information systems ability to generate specific evidence with regards to the measurement of our operational targets led to the use of perceptual data. This has possibly affected the validity/insufficiency of data and related results (awarding services related targets). Recommendations Revise the timescales of the 1st4sport selfassessment plan and publication of report for next year. Continue to increase the knowledge and understanding of our Strategic Management Team members with regards to the application of the EFQM model and RADAR principles. Raise awareness to achieve increased employee engagement next year. Ensure continuous enhancements/ upgrades of information systems and in particular the measurement of our operational target achievement rate to increase validity of outcomes. SAR 2014 Page 30 of 153

41 3.6 Conclusion External drivers and industry trends influence awarding organisations future sustainability. Self-assessment has therefore become more imperative to provide an insight of our business performance. Overall, our trends in 2014 followed the decreasing trends in demand which are evident in the qualifications market after many years of continuous increase, partly due to the changes in the funding for specific qualifications. Despite the increased competition, decreased demand and the continuously evolving regulatory expectations we have successfully maintained our competitive positioning and our awarding status with regulators. Key partnerships, strategic developments, increased stakeholder satisfaction, innovation and process effectiveness were the main factors for this, which enabled us to achieve the following in 2014: Ofqual and Welsh Government awarding organisation statuses were maintained (including QCF and NQF Functional Skills status). SQA awarding body approval status was maintained for our SVQ qualifications and audit outcomes were very positive. We are now ranked on the 25th position (from 24th last year) amongst 166 recognised awarding organisations who recorded achievements in 2013/14 academic year in the market for all regulated qualifications across 15 sectors. We still remain the third largest awarding organisation in terms of achievements in sector 08 - Leisure, Travel and Tourism (475,000 recorded achievements in the sector), amongst 47 recognised awarding organisations operating in this sector. We now operate across 5 sector subject areas - we expanded our provision to sector 03 - Agriculture, horticulture and animal care with our suite of horse racing qualifications. The 1st4sport Level 1 Award in Coaching Football (QCF) is listed in the top 50 largest qualifications in terms of achievements (with 23,360 achievements) across all regulated qualifications (46th position). The portfolio of our qualifications continues to grow; 35 new qualifications were developed and accredited in 2014 ensuring the provision of our qualifications meets and exceeds end-users expectations. In 2014 we offered 277 qualifications in 33 sports, 122 qualifications being coaching qualifications. The demand for our qualifications shows a decrease (7% decrease in the number of learner registrations, 10% decrease in the number of learner certifications). However, a demand in terms of total number of events authorised to be delivered by 1st4sport recognised centres remains high (5,300 events authorised). The number of learners with multiple 1st4sport qualifications continues to grow; 60,239 of our learners obtained more than one of our qualifications up until The largest number of 1st4sport Qualifications obtained by a single learner is 13. Existing technical development partnerships were effectively maintained and new ones established, facilitating our sustainability and expansion in new markets; 80% of our qualifications are developed in partnership with governing bodies of sport and in consultation with other organisations. We continue to (re)design and explore innovative technology portfolio in support of our awarding function, confirmed by the increased use of our recognised centres. The achievement rate of both the implementation of our strategy and the EFQM criteria remain positive, despite the slight decrease in scores (80% of strategic targets achieved, 687 points out of 1,000 on the EFQM score). To ensure we respond successfully to the ever-changing business environment of the education industry we will continue to measure our performance and explore new ways of working in order to meet society s needs and achieve maximum stakeholder satisfaction whilst maintaining. SAR 2014 Page 31 of 153

42 Trends in supply Trends in demand Appendices Appendix 1 Education Industry Research and Key Trends (Ofqual Report and SQA Accreditation Annual Review) A Ofqual Annual Qualifications Market Report England, Wales and Northern Ireland Academic Year (8 October 2015) The Ofqual report provides an overview of the qualifications market, a single reference point and information about participants in the regulated qualifications market. It is fundamental for our future planning and sustainability as it offers information on the qualifications market needs based on demand and supply. Furthermore, it establishes a benchmark against which comparisons across awarding organisations and key projections can be made. The report presents information on Ofqual, the recognised awarding organisations and the regulated qualifications they offer, the numbers of qualifications regulated by Ofqual and the learner achievements recorded for the academic year 2013/14. Key Findings in 2013/2014 Trends in Participation by 16 to 18 year-olds in total education and training increased to 86% and in full-time education it increased to 72%, participation reaching the highest level since consistent records began in The increase is influenced by the raising of the participation age as required by the Education and Skills Act These rules came into force in 2013 and initially required participation in some Trends by sector subject area Trends by qualification level Trends in learner achievements Trends in regulated qualifications Trends in market share form of education or training until the school year in which a child turns 17. The preparation for life and work sector remained the largest in terms of number of achievements in other qualifications (2.6 million), however achievements decreased by 13%. The health, public services and care sector is now the second largest in terms achievements in other qualifications (over 1 million), following a large increase of 15%. With the exception of the health, public services and care sector and the social sciences sector all remaining 13 sector subject areas recorded a decrease in learner achievements in other qualifications. Level 2 qualification achievements account for 44% of all achievements in qualifications other than GCSE and A level. The number of total achievements ( other qualifications, GCSE and A/AS level) decreased by 10% (from 17.9 to 16 million). The number of achievements in other qualifications decreased by 7% (from 9.2 to 8.5 million). This could be due to the Skills Funding Agency introducing new business rules in September 2013 to target funding on qualifications that most closely align with government skills policy. Qualifications with low or no enrolment were withdrawn. The number of achievements in QCF qualifications decreased by 6% (from 6.2 to 5.8 million). QCF remains the largest type of qualifications in terms of achievements. The number of achievements in functional skills increased by 18% (from 865,000 to just over 1 million). Functional skills is the second largest type of qualifications in terms of achievements. Nearly 13,000 qualifications had at least one achievement recorded, representing 53% of available qualifications. The number of available qualifications increased by 6% (from 23,642 to almost 24,965). The largest increase (16%) is seen in the qualifications designed for the QCF (from 16,770 to 19,474). Functional skills qualifications increased by 3% (from 232 to 240) and ESOL by 3% (from 193 to 198). The total number of awarding organisations decreased to 166 from 176 the previous year. The overall qualifications market remains highly concentrated, with 20 awarding organisations accounting for over 90% of all achievements. Pearson Education Ltd awarded nearly one-quarter of all achievements. SAR 2014 Page 32 of 153

43 A1.1 Demand for qualifications Outcomes from the analysis of the demand for qualifications for the 2013/14 academic year are presented in the following pages based on participation rates in education and number of learner achievements for each qualification level, type, and subject sector area. A1.1.1 Participation rates in education by age group (16 to 18 year-olds) A direct link between the level of participation in education or training and the demand for qualifications should be expected. However, various factors influence the level of participation in education, including government policy and employers increased demand for employees with certain qualifications, changes in birth rates influencing cohort sizes and funding/costs related to the qualifications. Since the numbers of qualifications that an individual may take can vary, the increase or decrease in demand is not necessarily proportionate to the participation rate. This impacts on our strategy and annual plan of provision to ensure industry demand is met. Participation in full-time education by 16 to 18 year-olds increased to 72% in 2014 and reached the highest level since consistent records began in The increase is influenced by the raising of the participation age as required by the Education and Skills Act These rules came into force in 2013 and initially required participation in some form of education or training until the school year in which a child turns 17. Data will continue to be influenced by the Act which is due to enforce the age being raised to the young person's 18th birthday in The largest annual increase was for 17 year-olds. The proportion of 16 to 18 year-olds not in education, employment or training (NEET) decreased to 7%. This is the lowest level since consistent records began in 1994 and the decrease is the resultant of increased participation in education and training which more than offset a slight decrease in the employment rate for those not in education and training. The percentage of 16 to 18 year-olds not in education or training but currently in employment has decreased by 50% since % 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 79% 79% 81% 82% 84% 84% 85% 86% Participation in education in England by age group - 16 to 18 year-olds ( ) 63% 64% 67% 69% 69% 69% 70% 72% Total education and training Full-time education Not in any education or training - in employment 12% 10% 9% 9% 7% 7% 7% 10% 10% 10% 9% 10% 6% 9% 8% 7% Not in any education, employment or training Chart A1.1 Participation rates in education in England for the age group (DfE SFR 19/2015) SAR 2014 Page 33 of 153

44 Percentage Percentage A1.1.2 Participation rates in education by gender The data collected by the DfE is split down into participation by gender. Certain types of qualifications are more likely to be taken by one gender and therefore the participation rates may influence demand for these qualifications. There are more females than males in full-time education with a gap of 5% in This gap has narrowed from 7% in For the first time in years the percentage for both males and females not in education, employment or training appears to be at the same level (7%). 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 78% 79% 81% 82% 82% 83% 84% 86% Participation in education in England by gender - males ( ) 60% 61% 65% 67% 66% 66% 67% 69% 10% 11% 11% 10% 11% 10% 8% Total Education and training Full-time education Not in any education, employment or training (NEET) Chart A1.2 Participation rates by gender - males (16-18 age group) in education in England (DfE SFR 18/2014) 7% % 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 80% 80% 82% 83% 85% 85% 87% 87% Participation in education in England by gender - females ( ) 67% 67% 70% 71% 72% 71% 73% 74% Total Education and training Full-time education Not in any education, employment or training (NEET) 9% 10% 9% 8% 9% 8% 7% 7% Chart A1.3 Participation rates by gender - females (16-18 age group) in education in England (DfE SFR 18/2014) SAR 2014 Page 34 of 153

45 Learner achievements (in millions) A1.1.3 Total number of achievements in regulated qualifications The demand for qualifications presented in the following pages is based on the number of learner achievements recorded for each qualification. The classifications of qualification types, levels and sectors that are assigned to qualifications are analysed in groups, rather than individually. Between 2008/09 and 2013/14, the number of achievements recorded has decreased by 3% (from 15.5 million to 16 million). Achievements decreased by 10% in 2013/14 compared to the previous year (from to million). Change in GCSE take-up is the biggest factor, with a decrease of 17% (from 6.4 million to 5.3 million). Achievements in other qualifications decreased by 7% (from 9.2 million to 8.6 million), in part caused by changes to funding and accountability measures. The decrease seen in AS and A level qualifications (4% - from 2.2 million to 2.1 million) is possibly due to GCSE changes made to school performance tables and the structure of the qualification. Trends in achievements recorded ( ) / / / / / /2014 Other qualifications GCSE A/AS Level Total Chart A1.4 Trends in achievements in the qualifications market (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) SAR 2014 Page 35 of 153

46 A1.1.4 Achievements in other qualifications by sector During 2013/14 a total of 12 out the 15 sector subject areas saw a decrease in the number of achievements. We specialise and still remain the third largest awarding organisation in terms of achievements in sector 08-Leisure, Travel and Tourism, which after the continued growth for the last five years shows a 13% decrease this year. We also operate in sector 13-Education and Training (6% decrease) and award the nationally recognised teaching, assessing, internal verification and mentoring qualifications, some of which came to an end in March In 2011 we extended our provision to also operate in sector 14-Preparation for Life and Work by implementing functional skills qualifications. This sector has seen the largest number of achievements (over 2.6 million), representing just under one-third of all achievements. Of the 20 qualifications with the most achievements, 7 of them are from this sector subject area. There were just over 1 million achievements in functional skills in this sector, representing 39% of all achievements in this sector subject area. In 2013 we also expanded in sector 01-Health, Public Services and Care with the Level 2 Award in Emergency First Aid at Work (QCF). This is the second largest and fastest-growing sector, after social services, with 15% increase in achievements. This is mainly due to an increase in first aid at work qualifications; individuals had to complete an accredited qualification in order to comply with the Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations Over the past six years, science and mathematics has been the fastest-growing sector in terms of achievements. In 2014 we expanded in sector 03-Agriculture, Horticulture and Animal Care with our suite of horseracing qualifications. Sector 3 is one of the smallest in terms of achievements; however achievement levels appear to be somewhat consistent across years with minor change in figures. Trends in achievements in qualifications other than GCSE and A level in each sector subject area by academic year ( ) Sector subject area 2009/ / / / / Health, Public Services and Care 1,129, , ,400 1,025,200 1,183, Science and Mathematics 142, , , , , Agriculture, Horticulture and Animal Care 106, , , , , Engineering and Manufacturing Technologies 399, , , , , Construction, Planning and the Built Environment 230, , , , , Information and Communication Technology 602, , , , , Retail and Commercial Enterprise 499, , , , , Leisure, Travel and Tourism 437, , , , , Arts, Media and Publishing 840, , , , , History, Philosophy and Theology 41,300 45,600 46,600 41,400 30, Social Sciences 3,100 4,500 4,200 4,700 6, Languages, Literature and Culture 364, , , , , Education and Training 118, ,400 96, ,500 99, Preparation for Life and Work 2,535,600 2,585,600 3,013,000 3,006,400 2,617, Business, Administration, Finance and Law 544, , , , ,500 Total 7,994,600 7,972,200 8,874,700 9,267,200 8,577,100 Table A1.1 Trends in achievements in other qualifications in each sector subject area (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) SAR 2014 Page 36 of 153

47 Learner achievements (in millions) Learner achievements A1.1.5 Achievements in other qualifications by level Qualifications other than GCSE, AS and A level in England, Wales and Northern Ireland are grouped into levels, from Entry level (1 to 3) to Level 8. Qualifications at the same level are at a broadly similar level of demand, but the size and content of the qualifications varies. Level 2 qualification achievements (excluding Level 1/Level 2 qualifications) account for 44% of all achievements in other qualifications in 2013/14. The number of achievements in Level 1/Level 2 qualifications (including qualifications known as Level 1/Level 2 Certificates or IGCSEs, which are taken as an alternative to GCSEs), increased by nearly 150% compared to the previous year. 4, , , , , , , , Trends in achievements in qualifications other than GCSE, AS and A level by level ( ) Entry Level Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 1/2 Level / / / / / /14 Chart A1.5 Trends in achievements in 'other' qualifications by level and academic year (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) Trends in total number of achievements recorded in qualifications other than GCSE, AS and A level across all levels ( ) / / / / / /14 Academic Year Chart A1.6 Trends in total number of achievements in 'other' qualifications across all levels (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) SAR 2014 Page 37 of 153

48 A1.1.6 Achievements in other qualifications by qualification type There has been a 7% decrease in the total number of achievements in other qualifications compared to the previous year. Eight of the 16 qualification types had a decrease of more than 30%, and five of these decreased by more than 75%; in the main caused by the qualification becoming obsolete. Other than the QCF type, which, covers a wide range of different types of qualifications, functional skills is the largest qualification type by achievements. The increased numbers reflect the change in funding that has also led to the decrease in achievements for basic skills and key skills qualifications. The number of achievements for ESOL qualifications increased by 24% compared to the previous year. This is due to an increase in awards in Entry level 3 (from 63,600 to 143,300), particularly in ESOL International Speaking and Listening and Skills for Life (Speaking and Listening). Since October 2013, non-english-speaking applicants for settlement and citizenship in Britain must complete an approved English qualification, such as ESOL qualifications at Entry level 3 and above. 1st4sport qualifications trends in terms of achievements within the four types of qualifications we award are similar to the market trends highlighted in table A1.2. However, some of our qualifications were only available for certification due to their qualification end date, responding successfully to the increasing demand of QCF and functional skills qualifications. Trends in achievements in qualifications other than GCSE and A level by type of qualification by academic year ( ) Qualification type 2009/ / / / /14 Advanced Extension Award Basic Skills 829, , , ,770 4,600 Diploma 4,677 9,232 10,853 2,771 0~ English for Speakers of Other Languages 332, , , , ,200 Entry Level 239, , , ,544 80,900 Free Standing Mathematics Qualification 23,741 25,486 22,941 23,143 35,800 Functional Skills 242, , , ,599 1,021,400 Higher Level 46,617 30,292 16,827 7,583 5,200 Key Skills 885, , , , ,800 National Vocational Qualification 978, , ,844 28,740 7,800 Occupational Qualification 23,209 17,478 4, Other General Qualification 969, , , , ,300 Principal Learning 7,203 17,067 17,217 5, Project 26,761 50,461 49,757 43,935 41,500 QCF 777,211 2,836,220 5,283,347 6,235,824 5,885,300 Vocationally-Related Qualification 2,607,284 1,399, , , ,700 Total 7,994,631 7,972,228 8,874,749 9,267,240 8,577,100 Table A1.2 Trends in other qualification achievements by qualification type (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) SAR 2014 Page 38 of 153

49 A1.1.7 Distribution of recorded achievements In 2013/14, there were almost 24,000 other qualifications and 52% of these having recorded achievements. Only a few qualifications had large numbers of achievements; CIEH Level 2 Award in Food Safety in Catering (QCF) and Cambridge International Level 1/Level 2 Certificate in First Language English were the two qualifications that had achievement numbers higher than 100,000. The CIEH qualification has consistently been the qualification with the most achievements recorded in recent years. Only 9% (2,242 qualifications) had more than 500 achievements. Trends in the number of qualifications other than GCSE & A level by number of achievements in 2013/14 Number of achievements Number of qualifications (2011/2012) Number of qualifications (2010/2011) Number of qualifications (2012/2013) Number of qualifications (2013/2014) Proportion (%) (2013/2014) More than 100, % 50,000-99, % 10,000-49, % 5,000-9, % 1,000-4,999 1, ,098 1,087 5% % ,055 4% ,468 1,323 1,583 1,601 7% ,204 1,154 1,303 1,399 6% ,744 2,337 2,943 3,222 13% 1-9 1,713 1,737 2,783 2,886 12% Zero 9,259 8,886 10,628 11,446 47% Total 19,321 18,287 22,489 23, % Table A1.3 Comparisons of number of other qualifications and number of achievements (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) A high proportion of achievements are concentrated in relatively few qualifications; 2% (246 qualifications) accounted for half of the number of achievements recorded in other qualifications. Cumulative number of qualifications (other than GCSE & A level) accounting for percentages of total achievements in 2013/14 Percentage of achievements Number of qualifications with achievements Proportion of qualifications with achievements (%) 25% 47 0% 50% 246 2% 75% 880 7% 90% 2,185 18% 100% 12, % Table A1.4 Other qualifications accounting for percentages of total achievements (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) SAR 2014 Page 39 of 153

50 Recognised organisations A1.2 Supply of regulated qualifications Awarding organisations are required to complete Ofqual s recognition procedure to be eligible to offer regulated qualifications. Since July 2011, new awarding organisations are required to comply with Ofqual s Criteria for Recognition; once recognised they must ongoing with Ofqual s General Conditions of Recognition. The number of recognised awarding organisations in 2013/14 has decreased by 7% from the previous year (from 176 to 166). This is due to a number of reasons including regulatory action, whereby 2 awarding organisations had their recognition withdrawn during the year, and surrender of recognition, including a number of organisations that were not awarding any qualifications. Trends in the number of Ofqual recognised organisations ( ) / / / / / / / / / / /2014 Academic year Chart A1.7 Total number of awarding organisations recognised to deliver regulated qualifications on 30 September in each year (Ofqual) A1.2.1 Market share of awarding organisations The majority of the organisations listed in the 25 top awarding organisations in terms of achievements reported a decrease in the number of achievements in 2013/14 compared to the previous year. Pearson, OCR, and AQA Education saw the largest decrease. 1st4sport is now ranked on the 25th position (market share 1%) amongst 166 recognised awarding organisations who recorded achievements in 2013/14 academic year in other qualifications across all sectors. 1st4sport is also the third largest awarding organisation in sector 08 - Leisure, travel and tourism, with 12% of total achievements in this sector. 1st4sport Level 1 Award in Coaching Football (QCF) is listed in the top 50 qualifications with the most achievements across all regulated qualifications (46th position). SAR 2014 Page 40 of 153

51 The 25 largest awarding organisations across all sectors in terms of achievements in other qualifications in England, Wales & Northern Ireland (2013/2014) Awarding Organisation Number of achievements Market share Competitive position Pearson Education Ltd 2,090, % 1 City and Guilds of London Institute 1,398, % 2 OCR 632, % 3 Chartered Institute of Environmental Health 304, % 4 NCFE 302, % 5 Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music 267, % 6 WJEC-CBAC 261, % 7 Highfield Awarding Body for Compliance 256, % 8 AQA Education 214, % 9 Cambridge English Language Assessment 194, % 10 Trinity College London 170, % 11 Cambridge International Examinations 165, % 12 NOCN 138, % 13 Qualsafe Awards 124, % 14 Excellence, Achievement & Learning Limited 91, % 15 BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT 81, % 16 Sports Leaders UK 81, % 17 Council for Awards in Care, Health and Education 79, % 18 First Aid Awards Ltd 78, % 19 Cskills Awards 72, % 20 LAMDA 65, % 21 Ascentis 60, % 22 Imperial Society of Teachers of Dancing 59, % 23 BIIAB 57, % 24 1st4sport Qualifications 57, % 25 Table A1.5 The 25 largest awarding organisations in terms of achievements in all qualifications across sectors in England, Wales and Northern Ireland (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) SAR 2014 Page 41 of 153

52 1st4sport Level 1 Award in Coaching Football (QCF) is listed in the top 50 qualifications with the most achievements across all regulated qualifications (46th position). The 50 qualifications with the most achievements in all regulated qualifications in England, Wales & Northern Ireland (2013/2014) Number of Qualification Title Type Description achievements CIEH Level 2 Award in Food Safety in Catering (QCF) QCF 154,630 Cambridge International Level 1/Level 2 Certificate in First Language English Other General Qualification 129,850 QA Level 2 Award in Emergency First Aid at Work (QCF) QCF 71,710 City & Guilds Functional Skills qualification in English at Level 1 Functional Skills 69,440 City & Guilds Functional Skills qualification in Mathematics at Level 1 Functional Skills 68,520 City & Guilds Functional Skills qualification in English at Level 2 Functional Skills 68,360 ABRSM Level 1 Award in Graded Examination in Music Performance (Grade 1) (QCF) QCF 62,175 Cambridge English Level 1 Certificate in English (IELTS ) (ESOL) English for Speakers of Other Languages 61,670 Pearson BTEC Level 2 Extended Certificate in Sport (QCF) QCF 59,475 City & Guilds Level 2 Award in Functional Skills Mathematics Functional Skills 58,245 HABC Level 2 Award in Emergency First Aid at Work (QCF) QCF 56,650 Pearson Edexcel Functional Skills qualification in Mathematics at Level 1 Functional Skills 54,705 Pearson Edexcel Functional Skills qualification in English at Level 1 Functional Skills 54,375 OCR Level 2 National First Award in ICT Vocationally-Related Qualification 52,625 FAA Level 2 Award in Emergency First Aid at Work (QCF) QCF 50,525 OCR Level 2 National Award in ICT Vocationally-Related Qualification 50,180 Pearson BTEC Level 1/Level 2 First Award in Principles of Applied Science Other General Qualification 49,295 Sports Leaders UK Level 1 Award in Sports Leadership (QCF) QCF 49,060 Pearson Edexcel Functional Skills qualification in English at Level 2 Functional Skills 47,020 Pearson BTEC Level 2 Extended Certificate in Applied Science (QCF) QCF 46,260 ABRSM Level 1 Award in Graded Examination in Music Performance (Grade 2) (QCF) QCF 45,760 Pearson Edexcel Functional Skills qualification in Mathematics at Level 2 Functional Skills 44,235 ABRSM Level 1 Award in Graded Examination in Music Performance (Grade 3) (QCF) QCF 39,500 OCR Level 1/2 Cambridge National Certificate in ICT Other General Qualification 39,330 CIEH Level 2 Award in Health and Safety in the Workplace (QCF) QCF 38,550 HABC Level 2 Award in Food Safety in Catering (QCF) QCF 37,525 SAR 2014 Page 42 of 153

53 Qualification Title Type Description Number of achievements TCL Entry Level Certificate in ESOL International - Speaking and Listening (Entry 3) English for Speakers of Other Languages 35,185 BIIAB Level 2 Award for Personal Licence Holders (QCF) QCF 34,210 City & Guilds Functional Skills qualification in mathematics at Entry 3 Functional Skills 33,220 QA Level 3 Award in First Aid at Work (QCF) QCF 31,005 IQL Level 2 Award in Pool Lifeguarding, Intervention, Supervision and Rescue (QCF) QCF 30,870 Pearson BTEC Level 2 Extended Certificate in Business (QCF) QCF 30,525 Cambridge English Level 2 Certificate in English (IELTS ) (ESOL) English for Speakers of Other Languages 29,295 AQA Level 3 Extended Project Project 28,945 Pearson BTEC Level 1/Level 2 First Award in Application of Science Other General Qualification 28,345 CIEH Level 2 Award in Emergency First Aid at Work (QCF) QCF 27,700 City & Guilds Functional Skills qualification in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) at Level 2 Functional Skills 27,350 ABRSM Level 2 Certificate in Graded Examination in Music Performance (Grade 4) (QCF) QCF 26,890 Pearson EDI Functional Skills qualification in mathematics at level 1 Functional Skills 26,615 Pearson Edexcel Functional Skills qualification in Mathematics at Entry 3 Functional Skills 26,570 BCS Level 2 Certificate in IT User Skills (ECDL Extra) (ITQ) (QCF) QCF 26,165 WJEC Level 2 Welsh Baccalaureate Intermediate Diploma Other General Qualification 26,145 ABRSM Level 2 Certificate in Graded Examination in Music Performance (Grade 5) (QCF) QCF 25,775 Pearson EDI Functional Skills qualification in English at Level 1 Functional Skills 25,625 WJEC Level 2 Essential Skills Wales in Application of Number Other General Qualification 24,890 1st4sport Level 1 Award in Coaching Football (QCF) QCF 23,360 WJEC Level 2 Essential Skills Wales in Communication Other General Qualification 23,090 City & Guilds Functional Skills qualification in English at Entry 3 Functional Skills 23,035 Cambridge English Entry Level Certificate in English (IELTS ) (Entry 3) (ESOL) English for Speakers of Other Languages 22,840 Pearson BTEC Level 2 Extended Certificate in IT (QCF) QCF 22,185 Table A1.6 The 50 high volume qualifications with the most achievements in all regulated qualifications in England, Wales & Northern Ireland (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) SAR 2014 Page 43 of 153

54 Regulated qualifications A1.2.2 Total number of regulated qualifications available The number of available qualifications in 2013/14 increased by more than 1,300 from the previous year, to nearly 25,000 (6% increase). The number of available qualifications has increased by 63% in the last five years but the increase between 2012/13 and 2013/14 was less pronounced. Available regulated qualifications by academic year ( ) 35,000 30,000 25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5, ,642 24,942 20,500 18,095 15,297 11, / / / / / /14 Academic year Chart A1.8 Total number of available regulated qualifications (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) Despite the large number of qualifications we award (277 in total), only 185 qualifications recorded learner achievements. Some of these qualifications with no achievements have become available towards the end of 2014 or were due to expire, and for others the length of course for completion may take 2 or 3 years. A1.2.3 Largest awarding organisations in terms of achievements in each sector skills area The distribution of achievements in 2013/14 in qualifications other than GCSE, AS and A level across the largest five awarding organisations by sector subject area is shown in table A1.5. Although there are 166 awarding organisations providing regulated qualifications, most of them provide qualifications in only a small number of sector subject areas. 1st4sport is the third largest awarding organisation in sector 08 - Leisure, travel and tourism, with 12% of total achievements in this sector. In each sector subject area, the three largest awarding organisations by number of achievements account for more than 50% of achievements (except in health, public services and care where it is 49%). In two sector subject areas (science and mathematics and social sciences), the two largest awarding organisations account for 80% or more of recorded achievements. The two largest awarding organisations by numbers of achievements account for 50% or more of the achievements recorded in 12 sector subject areas. SAR 2014 Page 44 of 153

55 The 5 largest awarding organisations in terms of the highest volume achievements in each sector subject area in 2013/14 Sector subject area Awarding organisation Achievements (2013/14) % of achievements % change (2012/ /14) 01 - Health, public services and care 02 - Science and Mathematics 03 - Agriculture, horticulture and animal care 04 - Engineering and manufacturing technologies 05 - Construction, planning and the built environment 06 - Information and communication technology 07 - Retail and commercial enterprise Pearson Education Ltd 287,400 24% 6% Highfield Awarding Body for Compliance 161,500 14% 40% NCFE 126,000 11% -18% Qualsafe Awards 120,100 10% 252% City and Guilds of London Institute 94,700 8% -9% Pearson Education Ltd 168,300 58% -5% AQA Education 69,800 24% 60% OCR 33,400 12% -25% Cambridge International Examinations 11,600 2% 10% WJEC-CBAC 3,900 1% 19% City and Guilds of London Institute 68,400 61% 5% Pearson Education Ltd 16,200 15% -6% Equestrian Qualifications Limited 9,900 9% -8% ABC Awards 3,200 3% -34% Royal Horticultural Society 3,000 3% -26% Chartered Institute of Environmental Health 93,900 23% -1% Excellence, Achievement & Learning Limited 67,000 17% -17% Pearson Education Ltd 66,200 16% -11% City and Guilds of London Institute 64,900 16% -25% IMI Awards Ltd 44,400 11% -7% City and Guilds of London Institute 98,400 42% 10% Cskills Awards 72,800 31% -24% Pearson Education Ltd 35,700 15% -5% Excellence, Achievement & Learning Limited 6,600 3% 127% Ascentis 5,300 2% -47% OCR 225,200 47% -24% Pearson Education Ltd 98,600 21% -41% BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT 79,700 17% -5% City and Guilds of London Institute 36,600 8% -11% The Learning Machine 14,300 3% 58% City and Guilds of London Institute 190,100 28% -12% Chartered Institute of Environmental Health 168,000 24% -11% Pearson Education Ltd 114,900 17% -17% Highfield Awarding Body for Compliance 55,400 8% 10% BIIAB 52,000 8% 13% SAR 2014 Page 45 of 153

56 Sector subject area Awarding organisation Achievements (2013/14) % of achievements % change (2012/ /14) 08 - Leisure, travel and tourism 09 - Arts, media and publishing 10 - History, philosophy and theology Pearson Education Ltd 171,300 36% -16% Sports Leaders UK 81,100 17% -4% 1st4sport Qualifications 57,000 12% -9% Institute of Qualified Lifeguards 32,800 7% -28% Active IQ 32,200 7% 7% Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music 267,200 30% -2% Pearson Education Ltd 188,200 21% -15% Trinity College London 97,400 11% 8% LAMDA 65,300 7% 20% Imperial Society of Teachers of Dancing 59,100 7% 5% National Open College Network 17,800 59% -39% Cambridge International Examinations 4,900 16% 41% OCR 3,000 10% -41% AQA Education 2,800 9% -5% Council for the Curriculum, Examinations & Assessment 1,300 4% 100% 11 - Social sciences Cambridge International Examinations 3,300 55% 39% AQA Education 2,400 40% 57% OCR 200 3% -43% Signature 100 2% -71% Council for the Curriculum, Examinations & Assessment 0~ - 133% 12 - Languages, literature and culture 13 - Education and training 14 - Preparation for life and work 15 - Business, administration, finance and law Cambridge English Language Assessment 159,900 37% 19% Cambridge International Examinations 140,400 32% 135% AQA Education 44,500 10% -18% OCR 29,400 7% -73% City and Guilds of London Institute 21,900 5% 42% City and Guilds of London Institute 30,300 30% -10% Pearson Education Ltd 17,400 17% -13% Council for Awards in Care, Health and Education 13,700 14% 2% OCR 10,500 11% -10% NCFE 5,400 5% -32% City and Guilds of London Institute 701,900 27% 4% Pearson Education Ltd 669,600 26% -25% WJEC-CBAC 245,200 9% 7% OCR 230,200 9% 2% AQA Education 123,500 5% 63% Pearson Education Ltd 256,100 40% -6% OCR 71,700 11% -3% City and Guilds of London Institute 67,700 10% -18% Institute of Leadership & Management 39,900 6% -1% Association of Accounting Technicians 38,700 6% 6% Table A1.7 The 5 largest awarding organisations in terms of achievements in each sector (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) SAR 2014 Page 46 of 153

57 A1.2.4 Number of regulated qualifications by qualification type Qualifications are divided into different types. Table A1.6 shows the number of available qualifications to certificate for each type, and table A1.7 shows the number of achievements awarded for each type. The types of qualifications that we award are highlighted in both tables. The largest increase is seen in qualifications developed to meet the design requirements of the QCF (16%, to 19,474). Increases were also seen in the numbers of functional skills (3%, to 240) and ESOL (3%, to 198) qualifications. The largest decrease is seen in basic skills and key skills (which have been replaced by functional skills qualifications) and in national vocational qualifications and vocationally related qualifications (which have mainly been replaced by equivalent QCF qualifications). Trends in the regulated qualifications of each type which were available to certificate by academic year ( ) Qualification type 2009/ / / / /14 % change (2012/ /14) Advanced Extension Award % Basic Skills % Diploma % English for Speakers of Other Languages % Entry Level % Free Standing Mathematics Qualification % Functional Skills % GCE A Level % GCE AS Level % GCSE % Higher Level % Key Skills % National Vocational Qualification 1,755 1,606 1,422 1, % Occupational Qualification % Other General Qualification % Principal Learning % Project % QCF 6,076 9,695 12,764 16,770 19,474 16% Vocationally-Related Qualification 2,773 2,395 2,105 1,654 1,129-32% Total 15,297 18,095 20,500 23,642 24,965 6% Table A1.8 Number of available regulated qualifications by qualification type (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) SAR 2014 Page 47 of 153

58 Achievements were recorded in more than 13,000 qualifications in 2013/14. This corresponds to 53% of available qualifications, which is 1% lower than in the previous year. Qualifications developed to meet the design requirements of the QCF accounted for 80% of qualifications with recorded achievements. In some areas, government policy changes (such as those affecting the Diploma and principal learning) have made some qualifications obsolete, which accounts for the decreases. In other areas, we see qualifications such as basic skills decrease as qualifications such as functional skills replace them. Trends in the regulated qualifications of each type for which achievements were recorded by academic year ( ) Qualification type 2009/ / / / /14 Change (2012/ /14) Advanced Extension Award Basic Skills Diploma English for Speakers of Other Languages Entry Level Free Standing Mathematics Qualification Functional Skills GCE A Level GCE AS Level GCSE Higher Level Key Skills National Vocational Qualification 1,257 1, Occupational Qualification Other General Qualification Principal Learning Project QCF 1,692 4,535 6,846 8,989 10, Vocationally-Related Qualification 1,959 1,602 1, Total 7,917 10,269 11,564 12,810 13,323 4 Table A1.9 Qualification types with achievements, rounded to the nearest 50 (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) SAR 2014 Page 48 of 153

59 A1.2.5 Awarding organisation operations by sector subject area Business, administration, finance and law had the largest number of awarding organisations with achievements (69). Preparation for life and work, which is the largest sector subject area by achievements, had 53 awarding organisations with achievements. The sector subject areas 1st4sport operate in are highlighted in the table below. Trends of awarding organisations operations in each sector subject area in other qualifications (2013/2014) Sector Subject Area Number of achievements Number of AOs Number of AOs with achievements 01 - Health, public services and care 1,183, Science and mathematics 288, Agriculture, horticulture and animal care 111, Engineering and manufacturing technologies 401, Construction, planning and the built environment 232, Information and communication technology 480, Retail and commercial enterprise 688, Leisure, travel and tourism 475, Arts, media and publishing 882, History, philosophy and theology 30, Social sciences 6, Languages, literature and culture 433, Education and training 99, Preparation for life and work 2,617, Business, administration, finance and law 647, Table A1.10 Awarding organisations trends in operations in each sector subject area (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) SAR 2014 Page 49 of 153

60 Learner achievements A1.2.6 Achievements in the QCF by level of qualification Trends in the number of achievements for QCF qualifications show a decrease in 2013/2014 across all levels, with the exception of entry level and level 3. 4,000,000 3,000,000 2,000,000 1,000,000 0 Chart A1.9 Number of achievements in the QCF by qualification level and academic year (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) Achievements for 1st4sport qualifications in 2014 accounted for 64% of level 1 qualifications, 32% of level 2 qualifications, 32% of level 3 and 0.1% of level 4 qualifications. A1.2.7 Achievements in the QCF by size of qualification Trends in QCF achievements ( ) Entry Level Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4-8 Oct - Sept 2009 Oct - Sept 2010 Oct - Sept 2011 Oct - Sept 2012 Oct - Sept 2013 Oct - Sept 2014 Qualifications that implement the QCF design specifications are made up of units. Each unit has a credit value which indicates how many credits are awarded when a unit is completed. Units contribute to the structure of each qualification. There are three different types of qualification in the QCF: award, certificate and diploma. An award can be achieved with 1 to 12 credits; a certificate with 13 to 36 credits and a diploma at least 37 credits. Qualification achievements by QCF size (2013/2014) Diploma 25% Award Certificate 33% Award 42% Certificate Diploma Chart A1.10 Percentage of qualification achievements in the QCF by qualification size (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) SAR 2014 Page 50 of 153

61 1st4sport trends are not too dissimilar to the market trends in terms of the distribution of learner achievements across the qualification sizes. Our learner achievements accounted for 72% award, 28% certificate and 0.1% diploma. A1.2.8 Achievements in the QCF by sector subject area With the exception of sector 01 - Health, public services and care, which recorded an increase in achievements in 2013/2014 and is now the largest sector, the rest of the 14 sectors showed a decrease in achievements. The sector subject areas 1st4sport operate in are highlighted in the table below. Trends in the number of achievements in the QCF by sector subject area by academic year ( ) Sector subject area 2009/ / / / / Health, public services and care 48, , , ,009 1,150, Science and mathematics , , ,486 90, Agriculture, horticulture and animal care 30,509 77, , , , Engineering and manufacturing technologies 43, , , , , Construction, planning and the built environment 49, , , , , Information and communication technology 73, , , , , Retail and commercial enterprise 138, , , , , Leisure, travel and tourism 8, , , , , Arts, media and publishing 72, , , , , History, philosophy and theology 0 32,512 32,552 29,047 18, Social sciences Languages, literature and culture 18,964 43,834 88,780 74,994 47, Education and training 35,259 56,428 87, ,886 99, Preparation for life and work 131, , , , , Business, administration, finance and law 126, , , , ,300 Total 777,211 2,836,220 5,283,347 6,235,824 5,885,300 Table 1.11 Achievements in the QCF by sector subject area (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) SAR 2014 Page 51 of 153

62 A1.2.9 High volume qualifications in the QCF in terms of achievements 1st4sport Level 1 Award in Coaching Football (QCF) is listed in the top 30 qualifications in the QCF with the most achievements (21st position); all except one of these 30 qualifications are at either Level 1 or 2. The top 30 qualifications in the QCF with the most achievements in England, Wales & Northern Ireland (2013/2014) Qualification Title Type Description Number of achievements CIEH Level 2 Award in Food Safety in Catering (QCF) QCF 154,630 QA Level 2 Award in Emergency First Aid at Work (QCF) QCF 71,710 ABRSM Level 1 Award in Graded Examination in Music Performance (Grade 1) (QCF) QCF 62,175 Pearson BTEC Level 2 Extended Certificate in Sport (QCF) QCF 59,475 HABC Level 2 Award in Emergency First Aid at Work (QCF) QCF 56,650 FAA Level 2 Award in Emergency First Aid at Work (QCF) QCF 50,525 Sports Leaders UK Level 1 Award in Sports Leadership (QCF) QCF 49,060 Pearson BTEC Level 2 Extended Certificate in Applied Science (QCF) QCF 46,260 ABRSM Level 1 Award in Graded Examination in Music Performance (Grade 2) (QCF) QCF 45,760 ABRSM Level 1 Award in Graded Examination in Music Performance (Grade 3) (QCF) QCF 39,500 CIEH Level 2 Award in Health and Safety in the Workplace (QCF) QCF 38,550 HABC Level 2 Award in Food Safety in Catering (QCF) QCF 37,525 BIIAB Level 2 Award for Personal Licence Holders (QCF) QCF 34,210 QA Level 3 Award in First Aid at Work (QCF) QCF 31,005 IQL Level 2 Award in Pool Lifeguarding, Intervention, Supervision and Rescue (QCF) QCF 30,870 Pearson BTEC Level 2 Extended Certificate in Business (QCF) QCF 30,525 CIEH Level 2 Award in Emergency First Aid at Work (QCF) QCF 27,700 ABRSM Level 2 Certificate in Graded Examination in Music Performance (Grade 4) (QCF) QCF 26,890 BCS Level 2 Certificate in IT User Skills (ECDL Extra) (ITQ) (QCF) QCF 26,165 ABRSM Level 2 Certificate in Graded Examination in Music Performance (Grade 5) (QCF) QCF 25,775 1st4sport Level 1 Award in Coaching Football (QCF) QCF 23,360 Pearson BTEC Level 2 Extended Certificate in IT (QCF) QCF 22,185 Pearson BTEC Level 1 Award in WorkSkills (QCF) QCF 21,440 HABC Level 2 Award in Door Supervision (QCF) QCF 20,925 AOFAQ Level 2 Award in Emergency First Aid at Work (QCF) QCF 18,935 NCFE Level 2 Certificate in Equality and Diversity (QCF) QCF 18,385 Pearson BTEC Level 2 Extended Certificate in Health and Social Care (QCF) QCF 17,760 NCFE Level 2 Certificate in Understanding the Safe Handling of Medicines (QCF) QCF 17,735 Pearson BTEC Level 2 Certificate in Customer Service (QCF) QCF 17,445 TCL Level 1 Award in the Arts (QCF) QCF 17,320 Table A1.12 Highest volume QCF qualifications in England, Wales & Northern Ireland (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) SAR 2014 Page 52 of 153

63 Learner achievements A Awarding organisations market share - functional skills qualifications Functional skills qualifications assess the practical skills that allow people to use English, mathematics, and information and communication technology (ICT) in real-life contexts, and are currently mandatory components in apprenticeship frameworks. There are 22 awarding organisations (increased from 16 last year), including 1st4sport, which recorded achievements in functional skills in 2013/14. Pearson and City & Guilds awarded 82% of all functional skills achievements. With the exception of AQA Education and NOCN, that recorded a decrease, the remaining 5 largest awarding organisations recorded an increase in the number of achievements in 2013/2014; following the upward trends in functional skills qualifications over the past five years. Achievements before the 2010/11 academic year were for pilot functional skills qualifications. Trends in achievements for the 7 largest functional skills awarding organisations ( ) 450, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,000 75,000 50,000 25, / / / / /14 Pearson City and Guilds Education Ltd of London Institute OCR AQA Education National Open College Network Skillsfirst Awards Ltd NCFE Others Chart A1.11 Achievements in functional skills qualifications across the 7 largest AOs (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) SAR 2014 Page 53 of 153

64 B SQA Accreditation Annual Review (2014/2015) This section focuses on the qualification market trends in Scotland, as presented within the SQA Accreditation Annual Review, with a focus on demand and supply of qualifications together with awarding bodies levels as a result of SQA Accreditation audit activity. For the purpose of this report only areas related to 1st4sport operations as an approved awarding body in the Scottish market are presented. 1st4sport qualifications operate within Area 007: Providing Goods and Services and offered one qualification in 2014 on the SCQF; the SVQ 3 in Leisure Management at SCQF Level 7. B1.1 Demand for SQA accredited qualifications Data presented on the performance of SQA accredited qualifications (table B1.1) is collected from approved awarding bodies on a quarterly basis and covers the financial year for SVQ qualifications, regulatory and licensing qualifications and other qualifications. In registrations for SVQ qualifications showed the first decrease (-4%) since However, the level of registrations remained in line with the high levels seen in This is a positive sign that business confidence remains and also that, although alternative competence-based qualifications are available, the SVQ product is still the preferred qualification type for some sectors. Certifications for SVQ qualifications continued the year on year increase by 3%. Another significant increase in the demand for Regulatory and Licensing qualifications was noted, with registrations having increased by 67% and certifications by 71%. This also reflects the continuous increase in the number of Regulatory and Licensing qualifications accredited. The vast increase in demand is also due to the popularity of the Scottish Certificate for Personal Licence Holders 1 (Refresher) at SCQF Level 6. There was a less significant increase in the demand for Other qualifications seen in previous years; registrations increased by 10% and certifications by 1%. This increase in Other qualifications in particular partly explains the less significant increase in SVQ uptake, with some awarding bodies opting for alternative competence-based qualifications over the traditional SVQ. 1 Due to changes in legislation, all holders of the Personal Licence Holder qualifications who have held the licence for five years were required to undertake the refresher qualification or latest accredited Scottish Certificate for Personal Licence Holders at SCQF level 6. SAR 2014 Page 54 of 153

65 Qualification market performance ( ) Qualification Type Year Registrations Percentage change (%) Certifications Percentage change (%) SVQ qualifications ,761 N/A 29,357 n/a ,879-18% 31,206 +6% ,155 13% 35, % ,405 5% 36,713 +4% ,245-15% 29,945-18% , % 32,397 +8% , % 34,362 +6% ,920-4% 35,358 3% Qualification Type Year Registrations Percentage change (%) Certifications Percentage change (%) Regulatory and licensing qualifications ,880 N/A 13,227 n/a ,192 9% 12,280-7% ,842 17% 17,166 39% ,830 67% 28,157 64% ,737 67% 48,161 71% Qualification Type Year Registrations Percentage change (%) Certifications Percentage change (%) Other qualifications ,384 N/A 4,529 n/a , % 19, % ,957 21% 21,534 12% ,158 17% 24,146 12% ,766 10% 24,293 1% Table B1.1 Trends in SQA accredited qualifications market performance SAR 2014 Page 55 of 153

66 Registered learners Registered learners 160, , , ,000 80,000 60,000 40,000 20,000 0 Trends in learner registrations for SQA accredited qualifications ( ) 135, ,104 81,089 92,243 66, Year Chart B1.1 Trends in the demand for SQA accredited qualifications number of learner registrations Trends in learner certifications for SQA accredited qualifications ( ) 120, , ,000 86,665 80,000 60,000 54,469 61,506 71,097 40,000 20, Year Chart B1.2 Trends in the demand for SQA accredited qualifications number of learner achievements/certifications SAR 2014 Page 56 of 153

67 B2.1 Supply of SQA accredited qualifications At the end of the operational year , there were 40 SQA Accreditation approved awarding bodies. Throughout the year, 3 organisations gained SQA-approved awarding body status (highlighted in table B1.2), 24 organisations contacted SQA Accreditation to explore the possibility of becoming an approved awarding body, and 6 submitted formal requests through the enquiry process; 2 of those have decided to progress to the approval stage. Skillsfirst Awards Limited had their approved status withdrawn at their request, due to zero uptake of their qualifications. List of the 40 awarding bodies approved by SQA Accreditation (March 2015) 1st4sport Qualifications Associated Sports Qualifications Alcohol Focus Scotland Association of Accounting Technicians Association of Chartered Certified Accountants BIIAB Chartered Institute of Housing Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development Chartered Management Institute City & Guilds of London Institute Engineering Construction Industry Training Board English Speaking Board Equestrian Qualifications GB Limited Excellence, Achievement and Learning Limited First Aid Awards Limited Future (Awards & Qualifications) Limited GQA Qualifications Limited Highfield Awarding Body for Compliance IMI Awards Limited Institute of Leadership and Management Institute of Revenues, Rating and Valuation ITEC ITC First Lantra Awards Limited Mineral Products Qualifications Council National Examination Board in Occupational Safety and Health PAA/VQ-SET PIABC Pearson Education Limited Princes Trust Rockschool Limited Royal Academy of Dance Safe Cert Awards Limited Safety Training Awards Limited SFEDI Awards Scottish Bakers Scottish Qualifications Authority Vocational Training Charitable Trust Industry Qualifications Limited Worshipful Company of Spectacle Makers Table B1.2 List of the 40 awarding bodies approved by SQA accreditation SAR 2014 Page 57 of 153

68 At the end of , SQA Accreditation had a total of 1,023 accredited qualifications of three different qualification types. In total, 43 accredited SVQs were withdrawn during The common rationale for awarding bodies withdrawing SVQs was low or zero uptake. In some instances, SVQs were replaced with alternative accredited competence-based qualifications. This has been driven in part by Modern Apprenticeship Frameworks where the SVQ has not been successful. Types of accredited qualifications in the Scottish market (Qualifications that have lapsed are not included) ( ) Qualification Types Number of qualifications (2012/13) Number of qualifications (2013/14) Number of qualifications (2014/15) Percentage change (%) No. of ABs offering these qualifications Proportion (%) of all accredited qualifications Scottish Vocational Qualifications (SVQs) % 18 70% Regulatory and Licensing qualifications (R&L) % 13 5% Other qualifications (such as competence-based qualifications) % 28 25% Total 940 1,008 1,023 1% % Table B1.3 Types of accredited qualifications in the Scottish market As in previous years, more SVQ levels 2 and 3 were accredited. This is a result of them being a mandatory qualification in Modern Apprenticeships. Of level 2 and 3 SVQs, 74% and 84% are present in Modern Apprenticeships respectively. Currently, 27 SVQ 4 qualifications and 7 SVQ 5 qualifications are part of Apprenticeship frameworks. These numbers may increase as more Technical and Professional Apprenticeships are approved. 1st4sport qualifications offered one qualification in 2014 on the SCQF; the SVQ 3 in Leisure Management at SCQF Level 7. SVQ accredited qualifications by level ( ) Qualification level Number of SVQ qualifications (2012/13) Number of SVQ qualifications (2013/14) Number of SVQ qualifications (2014/15) SVQ Level SVQ Level SVQ Level SVQ Level SVQ Level Total Table B1.4 Accredited SVQ by qualification level SAR 2014 Page 58 of 153

69 Count B3.1 Audit activity analysis of recorded requirements and recommendations SQA Accreditation carries out monitoring of all SQA-approved awarding bodies. In , SQA Accreditation s quality assurance processes were based on a range of measures, and was assessed against the Regulatory Principles (2014) and the associated Regulatory Principles Directives. SQA Accreditation s regulatory system uses comprehensive risk assessment to concentrate resources on the areas that need them most with the application of a Quality Enhancement Rating to each approved awarding body. The audits are based on a three-year cycle, depending on perceived risk. Annual monitoring of providers and/or training providers, investigations, and any extraordinary circumstances that are reported, all determine the frequency of audits so that no inspection ever takes place without reason. Provider monitoring visits check the effectiveness of the awarding body s systems and enable SQA Accreditation to identify any areas of concern that may help to inform SQA Accreditation regulatory activities and safeguard the learner experience. SQA Accreditation audit activity ( ) Chart B1.3 SQA Accreditation audit activity / / /15 Year Audits Provider monitoring visits Issues are recorded where there is evidence that there is significant risk to either the learner or the integrity of the qualification and therefore immediate and comprehensive action is required. During audit, one issue may be raised against multiple principles. A recommendation can be made if auditors consider that an awarding body s processes meet the Regulatory Principles but that either improvement could be made, or that allowing current processes to embed may pose a risk to the learner or the integrity of a qualification. During audit, one recommendation may be raised against multiple principles. During the audit period 2014/2015, the greatest number of issues identified was recorded against Regulatory Principles 6 and 10: Principle 6: The awarding body and its providers shall maintain accurate documents, records and data. Principle 10: The awarding body shall ensure that it has the necessary arrangements and resources for the effective delivery, assessment and quality assurance of SQA accredited qualifications. SAR 2014 Page 59 of 153

70 Various recommendations were identified, with the greatest number recorded against Regulatory Principles 5 and 10. Principle 5: The awarding body shall provide clear information on its procedures, products and services and ensure that they are accurate and appropriate to SQA accredited qualifications. Principle 10: The awarding body shall ensure that it has the necessary arrangements and resources for the effective delivery, assessment and quality assurance of SQA accredited qualifications. These highlighted principles which have the greatest number of issues and recommendations raised are key areas for SQA Accreditation, their approved awarding bodies and providers to learn from and consider in future activity. Summary of issues and recommendations raised against principles Principle Issues Recommendations Principle Principle Principle Principle Principle Principle Principle Principle Principle Principle Principle Principle Principle Principle Principle Total Table B1.5 Issues and recommendations raised against prinicples SAR 2014 Page 60 of 153

71 Summary of Audit Outcomes ( ) against Regulatory Principles (2014) Awarding Body Audit Date Issues Recommendations 1st4sport Qualifications 17-Jul AFS 11-Dec BIIAB 29-Jul City and Guilds 03 April 2014 & 05 March ECITB 04-Nov EQL 09-Jun GQA 25-Nov ILM 04-Feb IRRV 20-Nov WCSM 05-Jun Lantra 22-Oct PAA/VQSET 05-Feb Rockschool 10-Dec SafeCerts Awards 12-Jun CIPD 24-Feb Associated Sport Qualifications 25-Jun Scottish Bakers 30-Mar FAAL 31-Mar Table B1.6 Audit Outcomes against Regulatory Principles (2014) Of the 18 awarding bodies audited by SQA, 1st4sport qualifications was amongst the 3 awarding bodies with the least number of issues (1) and amongst the 6 awarding bodies with the least number of recommendations (2). On average, 3 issues and 3 recommendations were raised to awarding bodies as a result of the audits. SAR 2014 Page 61 of 153

72 Accredited qualifcations Number of approved applications Appendix 2 1st4sport key performance statistics Overall it appears that key trends in 2014 show a decrease in both the demand and supply of qualifications. A more detailed representation of figures and rationale is provided in the following charts Chart A2.1 Trends in the demand for qualifications number of new recognised centre and qualification approvals statuses granted The increase in the number of new recognised centre and qualification approval status is primarily due to the transfer of the BHEST centres to 1st4sport, following the launch of the new suite of horseracing and farriery qualifications Trends in the number of new recognised centres and qualification approvals ( ) Chart A2.2 Trends in the supply of qualifications number of 1st4sport accredited qualifications Year During 2014 a total of 35 new qualifications were developed and accredited, however this is not reflected in the overall increase as the life of many qualifications on the NQF has ended. In 2014 we offered 277 qualifications in 33 sports, 122 qualifications being coaching qualifications. It must be noted that in the total of 277 qualifications, pathways, disciplines and add-on modules are counted as separate qualifications to ensure consistency with our IT systems functionality and the associated audit trail maintained Trends in the number of accredited qualifications ( ) Applications granted Centre Recognition Applications granted Qualification Approval Year SAR 2014 Page 62 of 153

73 Despite the large number of qualifications we award (277 in total), only 185 qualifications recorded learner achievements. Some of these qualifications with no achievements have become available towards the end of 2014 or were due to expire, and for others the length of course for completion may take 2 or 3 years. The following charts illustrate the supply of our qualifications and respective demand/learner take up. Distribution of 1st4sport accredited qualifications by qualification level (2014) Distribution of learner achievements across 1st4sport qualifications by level (2014) Level 3 47% Level 4 1% Entry Level 2% Level 1 19% Level 2 32% Entry Level Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 2 32% Level 3 32% Level 4 0.1% Level 1 64% Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Chart A2.3 1st4sport qualifications offered and qualifications achieved by learners across levels Trends in the qualifications market show that the largest number of achievements (qualifications in the QCF) was recorded against level 2 qualifications (49%), followed by level 1 (22%) and level 3 (19%). Achievements for entry level accounts for 7% and level 4-8 for 2%. Distribution of 1st4sport accredited qualifications by QCF size (2014) Distribution of learner achievements across 1st4sport qualifications by QCF size (2014) Certificate 54% Diploma 12% Award 34% Award Certificate Diploma Certificate 28% Diploma 0.1% Award 72% Award Certificate Diploma Chart A2.4 1st4sport qualifications offered and qualifications achieved by learners in terms of QCF size Trends in the qualifications market show that the largest number of achievements was recorded against awards (42%), followed by certificates (33%) and diplomas (25%). SAR 2014 Page 63 of 153

74 Registered learners Events authorised The increased number of our regulated qualifications is in line with the upward trends of the number of available regulated qualifications in the qualifications market, designed to meet the QCF requirements. This data should be treated with care as it includes in some cases the QCF and NQF version of some qualifications that expired during ,000 6,000 5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 1, ,627 4,269 1st4sport trends in event authorisations ( ) 4,583 5,124 5,089 4,799 Chart A2.5 Trends in the demand for qualifications number of event authorisations 5,252 5,333 5, Year Despite the minor decrease of 0.01% in the number of events authorised to be delivered by 1st4sport recognised centres in 2014 the trends remain positive. On the contrary, 2014 saw the largest decrease in both the number of learner registrations (10%) and learner certifications (7%) since 2006, which is similar to the trends reflected in the overall qualifications market. 90,000 80,000 70,000 60,000 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10, st4sport trends in learner registrations ( ) 76,193 74,330 73,122 73,158 73,438 65,866 57,417 58,980 58, Year Chart A2.6 Trends in the demand for 1st4sport qualifications number of registered learners SAR 2014 Page 64 of 153

75 Registered learmers Learners certificated 80,000 70,000 60,000 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 0 Trends in learner certifications for 1st4sport qualifications ( ) 63,798 62,856 64,754 64,069 53,501 61,510 57,198 44,540 44, Year Chart A2.7 Trends in the demand for 1st4sport qualifications number of learner achievements/certifications The decrease in our learner achievements in 2014 is analogous to the decreased trend in the qualifications market. When reviewing learner certification figures several factors should be taken into consideration that may affect the accuracy of data, such as the time at which the data is exported from the system and also the length of some qualifications, which might be spread over two or three years. Trends in participation by gender (registered learners ) 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 87% 85% 83% 82% 83% 83% 82% 13% 15% 17% 18% 17% 17% 18% Year Registered male learners Registered female learners Chart A2.8 Trends in learner participation by gender SAR 2014 Page 65 of 153

76 Registered learners Registered learners 50% 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% Participation by age (registered learners ) 40% 27% 27% 5% 1% Age Age Age Age Age 50 or over Age group Chart A2.9 Trends in learner participation by age 60% Participation by ethnicity (registered learners ) 50% 46% 46% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% White British Prefer not to say/not supplied 2% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% White Black Mixed Background Ethnicity Asian Asian British Black British Other Chart A2.10 Trends in learner participation by ethnicity SAR 2014 Page 66 of 153

77 Number of requests Registered learners 50% 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% 43% 13% Disability types in participation (registered learners ) 11% 11% 5% 4% 4% 3% 2% 1% 1% 1% 1% Chart A2.11 Disability types of learners In 2014 there were 720 cases of disability confirmed at the stage of learner registration across 65,866 registered learners in This accounts for 1% of the total registered learners Trends in the number of requests for reasonable adjustments ( ) Year Chart A2.12 Trends in reasonable adjustment requests The reasonable adjustment requests were related to 28 qualifications. Of the 95 requests evaluated in 2014 only 9 have been declined; this was mainly due to learners inability and/or lack of evidence to meet the eligibility criteria, and also due to learners decision to withdraw from the course. It is interesting to note that out of 720 reported disabilities only 95 requests for reasonable adjustments were required. SAR 2014 Page 67 of 153

78 Number of incidents Number of requests Chart A2.13 Trends in special consideration requests Trends in the number of requests for special consideration ( ) The special consideration requests were related to 30 qualifications. 17% of special consideration requests were not granted (26 requests not granted out of 153). This was based on the invalid rationale provided and/or lack of associated evidence to support learner s eligibility for special consideration Year 153 Trends in the number of incidents ( ) Chart A2.14 Trends in the number of incidents managed Incident types may include a sanction against a centre reported by an EV, learner appeal against the outcomes of their assessment by their centre, learner complaint against their centre, suspected learner misconduct, suspected non- by a centre, suspected child or vulnerable adult safeguarding issue by a centre, customer service complaint to 1st4sport from a centre, customer service complaint to 1st4sport from a learner, suspected non- by 1st4sport, suspected child or vulnerable adult safeguarding issue by 1st4sport, centre appeal against a 1st4sport procedural decision or learner appeal against a 1st4sport procedural decision. Year SAR 2014 Page 68 of 153

79 Appendix 3 Strategic direction achievement rates A3.1 Strategic direction achievement results The overall strategic direction achievement rate for 2014 appears to be lower than previous years, yet positive (80% in 2014 and 92% in 2013). Supporting evidence (SDPL) is provided on specific targets to provide the rationale for the associated performance levels. Strategic Direction Critical Success Factors Strategic Targets Achievement of target Performance levels (2014) (2013) (2012) (2011) (2010) Maintain and extend the awarding organisation Maintain AO status by ensuring with Ofqual General Conditions of Recognition Maintain AO status by ensuring with Welsh Government General Conditions of Recognition Maintain AO status by ensuring with SQA Accreditation Regulatory Principles Ensure annual risk profile does not exceed Risk Tolerance Level 4 Achieved Target met Ensure 80% of the annual plan of provision is achieved each year Achieved 100% 98% 100% N/A N/A Achieved 100% N/A N/A N/A N/A Achieved 100% 100% 100% Target met Achieved (SDPL1) Target met Target met N/A N/A N/A 100% 100% 92% 84% 82% Increase the number of accredited qualifications Not achieved -3% 3% 8% 55% 43% Maintain and extend the business of > 65% of UKCC sports for the development and awarding of QCF coaching provision at levels 1-3 Ensure increased demand annually (learner registrations - LR and learner certifications - LC) Achieved 82% 81% 82% 80% 79% Not achieved -10% (LR) - 7% (LC) 0.4% (LR) -4% (LC) -1% (LR) - 1% (LC) -1.6% (LR) 3% (LC) Ensure 80% of predicted take-up is achieved annually Not achieved 74% 53% 95% 83% 54% Develop 80% of the annual plan of provision in partnership with nationally recognised bodies/identified technical experts Achieved 80% 80% 83% 80% 95% Establish three new qualification partnerships/consultants annually Achieved 100% Target not met Apply to enter the EFQM Committed to Excellence level by 1 October 2014 Not achieved Target not met 100% N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A Achieve min. score of 550 (out of 1000) against the EFQM model Achieved % (LR) -1.5% (LC) SAR 2014 Page 69 of 153

80 Critical Success Factors Strategic Targets Achievement of target Performance levels (2014) (2013) (2012) (2011) (2010) Maintain and extend the awarding organisation Critical Success Factors Maintain and extend the awarding function Ensure 70% overall strategic target achievement rate Achieved 80% 92% 94% 93% 80% 80% stakeholders confirm 1st4sport improve each year and meet needs/ expectations, providing value added service Identify, develop and maintain fit for purpose IT systems 2 to support the awarding function and services to stakeholders (Athena/Online Services) Ensure the website provides current, accurate and relevant information for stakeholders Achieved 94% 96% 92% 93% 91% Achieved 95% (A) 96% (OS) Launch the Advanced Secure e-module by October 2014 Not achieved Target not met Operational Targets 99% (A) 100% (OS) 91% (A) 91% (OS) 81% (A) 73%(OS) 91% (A) Achieved 96% 99% 97% 97% 95% Achievement of target Conduct annual self-assessment and publish report to all stakeholders Achieved Target met Conduct annual self-evaluation against regulations and submit to regulators within the prescribed time-scale Acknowledge, provide updates or final outcomes to 100% incident and risk reports within/every 25 working days Confirm 80% recognition and qualification approval within 10 days of the recognition and approval verification visit Confirm 80% of qualification approvals within 2 working days of receipt of fully completed application Work towards 70% of courses/cohorts being externally verified at a ratio of 1:6/1:75 (where < 6 courses annually a minimum of 1 course is verified) Ensure 70% of verification outcomes are forwarded to centres within 5 working days of the external verification activity occurring Achieved N/A N/A N/A N/A Performance levels 86%(OS) (2014) (2013) (2012) (2011) (2010) Target met Target met Target met Target met Target met Target met N/A Target met N/A Not achieved 96% 100% 100% 79% 82% Achieved 98% 97% 91% 90% 64% Not achieved 47% 95% 96% 100% 91% Achieved (SDPL2) 72% 74% 78% 68% N/A Achieved 91% 90% 85% 93% 89% Ensure 80% of EV workforce achieved expectations annually Achieved 95% 98% 94% 93% 89% 2 This includes Athena (A) and Online Services (OS). The percentage shown for online service use only applies to those who receive this service (this does not include Gymnastics, Cricket Boards, County Football associations, Rugby Football Union Regional Centres and Welsh Rugby Union Regional Centres). SAR 2014 Page 70 of 153

81 Critical Success Factors Operational Targets Achievement of target Performance levels (2014) (2013) (2012) (2011) (2010) Maintain and extend qualification provision Ensure each qualification adds value to the career/role pathway of learners Achieved 98% 98% 98% 92% 93% 90% stakeholders confirm qualification resources are clear and effective for the use of centre staff and learners Acknowledge, update and/or provide outcomes to 70% of qualification proposals within/every 25 working days Develop 80% of valid qualifications within 6 months of receipt of the proposal Achieved 96% 97% 98% 96% 95% Not able to be measured Not achieved (SDPL1) N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 44% N/A N/A N/A N/A Ensure 100% of operational qualifications undergo the required monitoring Achieved 100% N/A N/A N/A N/A Maintain and extend awarding systems and services Respond to requests for awarding data within 10 working days of the required date 80% course/programme authorisation requests are processed and confirmed within 5 working days of receipt 80% learner/workforce resources are dispatched as a minimum 10 working days prior to the start date of the course/programme (non fast track) 80% learners are registered within 20 working days of receipt of the registration request 80% claims for learner certification are validated, processed and dispatched within 20 working days of the request 80% certificate replacement requests are effectively processed within 10 working days of receipt 80% written assessment papers are dispatched as a minimum 5 working days prior to the specified date on the request 80% event cancellation/postponement/termination and learner transferral/ withdrawal requests are processed within 10 working days of receipt Provide an outcome to 80% access arrangement (reasonable adjustment, special consideration) within 10 working days of receipt Successfully dispatch resources based on valid data and reports ensuring a reduction in errors and customer service complaints Table A3.1 Strategic direction achievement and performance levels Achieved 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% Achieved 96% 99% 94% 93% 95% Achieved 96% 99% 92% 88% 93% Achieved 99% 98% 98% 95% 97% Achieved 98% 100% 96% 94% 87% Achieved 98% 98% 98% 91% 86% Achieved 99% 98% 98% 95% 99% Achieved 100% 100% 98% 97% 99% Achieved 95% 100% 95% 96% 94% Achieved 99.6% 99% 99.5% 99.7% 99.7% SAR 2014 Page 71 of 153

82 Strategic and operational target achievement rate (2014) Not achieved 18% Not able to be measured 2% Achieved 80% Achieved Not achieved Not able to be measured Chart A3.1 Overview of strategic and operational target achievement (2014) A3.2 Strategic direction performance levels (SDPL) evidence 1 Operational - conduct review 13% Developing - accredit and implement 19% Plan of qualification provision (2014) Expired/ Withdrawn - monitor to certification end date 6% Operational - conduct withdrawal 5% Operational - conduct monitoring 57% Qualification development outcomes upon review of qualification development proposal (2014) Development Cancelled 22% Proposal rejected/ diverted 14% Qualification Accredited 64% Chart A3.2 Qualifications plan of provision (2014) Chart A3.3 Development outcomes following review of proposals (2014) The achievement rate against the target for the development of valid qualifications within 6 months of receipt of the proposal was very low (44%). This was primarily due to the lack of sufficient resources (1st4sport staff, qualification development partner support). The average time for the development of valid qualifications was 7.5 months, with some qualifications being developed in the short period of 3 months and one qualification developed in 16 months. SAR 2014 Page 72 of 153

83 Count A3.3 Strategic direction performance levels (SDPL) evidence 2 The comparison of the verification activity illustrated in chart A3.5 provides an overview of the verification trends; a proportion of verification activity against the events delivered. It must be noted that the verification target of courses/cohorts was changed in 2010 from 1:4 to 1:6 and from 1:50 to 1:75 respectively. The total number of events delivered (5,285) does not include cancelled and overseas courses; hence it is lower than the total number of courses authorised (5,300) in Based on the data from Athena 1,140 external verification activities took place in However, some additional verification forms appear to be open in the system. This indicates that the verification process planning has started but not yet completed as EVs are awaiting specific event dates. Trends in the total number of events delivered and verified (2014) 6,000 5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 1, ,594 5,007 5,054 Chart A3.4 Trends in the volumes of verification activity 4,760 5,231 5,320 5, ,143 1,174 1, Year Total number of events delivered Total number of events verified Types of verification activity undertaken (2014) Visit to provide training and/or advice 3% Desk review of first course (DCS review) 4% Visit to provide training and/or advice 3% Visit to verify a cohort of learners 3% Desk review of centre systems 2% Desk review of a cohort of learners 2% Visit to verify DCS after sanctions 1% Desk review of a course 9% Visit to verify first course (DCS review) 23% Chart A3.5 Verification activity undertaken by type Visit to verify a course 52% Desk review of DCS after sanctions 1% SAR 2014 Page 73 of 153

84 Achievement of the verification targets is very significant; external verification is the key external quality assurance mechanism which enables monitoring of centre activity; identifying and taking action related to instances of non- and potential risk. A comprehensive statistical analysis has therefore been undertaken based on target achievement of 70% of the ratio of 1:6 courses and 1:75 cohorts for specific qualifications. Table A3.2 presents the course verification achievement rate (1:6), followed by table A3.3 which illustrates the cohort verification results (1:75). Although verification rates per qualification appear to be both below and above the set target overall results show that the achievement target for courses and cohorts was met (72%). This was predominantly due to the revised external verification team structure and CEV role as well process optimisation, which have contributed to improvements in this area. Several factors should be considered when analysing and reporting on these results, such as: the data covers verification activities and courses delivered during the calendar year This may not reflect the actual target results, as the nature and length of qualifications may spread over two or three years. Similarly, there are instances where the verification planning process has started but not completed, as this will be dependent on the relevant course dates, which might extend to the next calendar year discrepancies in the data might have affected these results due to External Verification Report Forms possibly containing incorrect verification dates or level/title of the qualification a number of courses required heightened or minimum monitoring via external verification based on our risk based approach and the respective centre risk profile the current data collection process and analysis method used to report on the achievement rate against the 1:75 verification of cohorts is based on the number of events verified and not the number of learners. the total number of events per qualification includes in a few instances events which were set up only to enable our IT systems to process registrations of learners, hence this does not represent actual events which were delivered some qualifications have a high rate of verification activity and this is due to the fact that only one course is delivered every year by a number of different centres or the qualification is also part of apprenticeship, which increases the level of EV intervention. Target achievement rate on verification of courses per qualification (2014) Qualification Events EV Intervention Verification target (1:6,min. 1 annually) Functional Skills Qualification in English at Level Met Target achievement Functional Skills Qualification in English at Level Not Met Functional Skills Qualification in Mathematics at Level Met Functional Skills Qualification in Maths at Level Not Met Level 1 Award In Coaching Angling (QCF) Met Level 1 Award In Coaching Archery (QCF) Met Level 1 Award in Coaching Badminton (QCF) Met SAR 2014 Page 74 of 153

85 Qualification Events EV Intervention Verification target (1:6,min. 1 annually) Level 1 Award in Coaching Basketball (QCF) Met Level 1 Award in Coaching Boccia (QCF) Met Level 1 Award In Coaching Bowls (QCF) Met Target achievement Level 1 Award in Coaching Cricket (QCF) Not Met Level 1 Award in Coaching Cycling (QCF) Not Met Level 1 Award in Coaching Fives (QCF) Met Level 1 Award in Coaching Football (QCF) Met Level 1 Award in Coaching Gymnastics (QCF) Met Level 1 Award in Coaching Hockey (QCF) Not Met Level 1 Award In Coaching Lacrosse (QCF) Met Level 1 Award in Coaching Netball (QCF) Met Level 1 Award in Coaching Orienteering (QCF) Met Level 1 Award in Coaching Parkour/ Freerunning (QCF) Not Met Level 1 Award in Coaching Rounders (QCF) Not Met Level 1 Award in Coaching Rugby League (QCF) Met Level 1 Award in Coaching Rugby Union (QCF) Met Level 1 Award in Coaching Squash (QCF) Met Level 1 Award In Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) Met Level 1 Award in Coaching Table Tennis (QCF) Not Met Level 1 Award in Coaching Tennis (QCF) Not Met Level 1 Award in Coaching Triathlon (QCF) Met Level 1 Award in Coaching Volleyball (QCF) Met Level 1 Award in Coaching Weight Lifting (QCF) Met Level 1 Award in Coaching Wrestling (QCF) Not Met Level 1 Award in the Principles of Coaching Sport (QCF) Met Level 1 Award In Using Sport to Tackle Youth Crime (QCF) Met Level 1 Certificate in Preparation for Event Volunteering (QCF) Not Met SAR 2014 Page 75 of 153

86 Qualification Events EV Intervention Verification target (1:6,min. 1 annually) Level 1 NVQ Award in Sport and Active Leisure (QCF) Met Level 2 Award in Employment Awareness in Active Leisure and Learning (QCF) Met Level 2 Award in Employment Awareness in the Outdoors (QCF) Met Level 2 Award in First Aid for Sport (QCF) Met Level 2 Award In Introductory Work in the Outdoors (QCF) Met Level 2 Award in Leadership through Football (QCF) Met Level 2 Award in Leadership through Rugby Union (QCF) Met Level 2 Award In Multi-Skills Development in Sport (QCF) Met Target achievement Level 2 Award In Refereeing Rugby League (QCF) Not Met Level 2 Award in the Principles of Coaching Sport (QCF) Met Level 2 Award in the Treatment and Management of Injury in Sport (QCF) Met Level 2 Award in Understanding Stewarding at Spectator Events (QCF) Met Level 2 Award in Understanding the Active Leisure and Learning Sector Not Met Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Angling (QCF) Met Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Badminton (QCF) Not Met Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Basketball (QCF) Met Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Bowls (QCF) Not Met Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Cable Wakeboarding (QCF) Met Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Children s Cricket (QCF) Met Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Cricket (QCF) Not Met Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Cycling (QCF) Not Met Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Fives (QCF) Not Met Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Football (QCF) Met Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (QCF) Met Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Handball (QCF) Met Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Hockey (QCF) Not Met Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Judo (QCF) Not Met Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Lacrosse (QCF) Met SAR 2014 Page 76 of 153

87 Qualification Events EV Intervention Verification target (1:6,min. 1 annually) Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Netball (QCF) Met Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Orienteering (QCF) Met Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Parkour/Freerunning (QCF) Met Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Rounders (QCF) Met Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Rowing (QCF) Met Target achievement Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Rugby League (QCF) Not Met Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Rugby Union (QCF) Met Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Squash and Racketball (QCF) Met Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) Met Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Table Tennis (QCF) Met Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Tennis (QCF) Met Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Triathlon (QCF) Not Met Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Volleyball (QCF) Met Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Water Skiing/Wakeboarding (QCF) Met Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Weight Lifting (QCF) Not Met Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Wrestling (QCF) Met Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Young People and Adults Cricket (QCF) Met Level 2 Certificate In Introductory Work in the Outdoors (QCF) Not Met Level 2 Certificate in Leisure Operations (QCF) Met Level 2 Certificate in Supporting Learning in Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) Met Level 2 Certificate in the Principles and Preparations for Coaching Sport (QCF) Met Level 2 Diploma in Coaching Tennis (QCF) Not Met Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Active Leisure, Learning and Well-being Operational Services (QCF) Met Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Activity Leadership (QCF) Met Level 3 Award In Assessing Competence in the Work Environment (QCF) Met Level 3 Award In Assessing Vocationally Related Achievement (QCF) Met Level 3 Award in Delivering Learning 2013 (QCF) Met Level 3 Award in Education and Training (QCF) Met SAR 2014 Page 77 of 153

88 Qualification Events EV Intervention Verification target (1:6,min. 1 annually) Level 3 Award in Employment Awareness in Active Leisure and Learning (QCF) Met Level 3 Award in the Principles of Coaching Sport (QCF) Met Level 3 Award in Workforce Mentoring (QCF) Met Level 3 Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (Basketball) (QCF) Met Target achievement Level 3 Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (Handball) (QCF) Not Met Level 3 Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (QCF) Met Level 3 Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (Rowing) (QCF) Not Met Level 3 Certificate In Assessing Vocational Achievement (QCF) Met Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Badminton (QCF) Not Met Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Basketball (QCF) Met Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Cricket (QCF) Met Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (QCF) Not Met Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Hockey (QCF) Met Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Judo (QCF) Met Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Mountain Biking (QCF) Met Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Netball (QCF) Met Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Road and Time Trial Cycling (QCF) Met Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Rowing (QCF) Not Met Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Rugby League (QCF) Met Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Rugby Union (QCF) Met Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Squash (QCF) Not Met Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) Not Met Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Tennis (QCF) Met Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Track Cycling (QCF) Met Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Triathlon (QCF) Met Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Wakeboarding (QCF) Met Level 3 Certificate in Employment Awareness in the Outdoors (QCF) Met Level 3 Certificate In Leisure Management (QCF) Not Met SAR 2014 Page 78 of 153

89 Qualification Events EV Intervention Verification target (1:6,min. 1 annually) Level 3 Certificate In Managing Sports Volunteers (QCF) Met Level 3 Certificate in Supporting the Delivery of Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) Met Target achievement Level 3 Certificate in Talented Athlete Lifestyle Support (QCF) Not Met Level 3 Certificate in the Treatment and Management of Injury in Sport 2014 (QCF) Met Level 3 Certificate in Understanding Sports Performance (Basketball) (QCF) Met Level 3 Certificate in Understanding Sports Performance (Handball) (QCF) Not Met Level 3 Certificate in Understanding Sports Performance (QCF) Met Level 3 Certificate in Understanding Sports Performance (Rowing) (QCF) Not Met Level 3 Diploma in Coaching Tennis (QCF) Not Met Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Leisure Management (QCF) Met Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Outdoor Programmes (QCF) (via the Outdoor Education Pathway) Met Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Outdoor Programmes (QCF) (via the Outdoor Recreation Pathway) Met Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Sports Development Met Level 4 Award In the Internal Quality Assurance of Assessment Processes and Practice (QCF) Met SVQ 3 in Leisure Management at SCQF Level Met Total Table A3.2 Analysis of target achievement rate on verification of courses per qualification Target achievement rate on verification of cohorts per qualification (2014) Qualification Events EV Intervention Verification target (1:75,min. 1 annually) Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Spectator Safety (QCF) Met Level 3 NVQ Certificate in Spectator Safety (QCF) Met Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (QCF) Met Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Supporting the Delivery of Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) Met Level 4 NVQ Diploma in Spectator Safety Management (QCF) Not met Total Table A3.3 Analysis of target achievement rate on verification of cohorts per qualification Target achievement SAR 2014 Page 79 of 153

90 Appendix 4 Self-evaluation - Statutory Compliance Outcomes Self-evaluation and monitoring of our with regulations is fundamental to ensure we maintain our awarding status and continue to operate within particular areas and award specific types of qualifications. Therefore, a continuous self-evaluation of our with the following statutory regulations was undertaken: General Conditions of Recognition - Ofqual (November, 2014) General Conditions of Recognition Welsh Government (March, 2014) SQA Accreditation s Regulatory Principles (2014) The self-evaluation was conducted using the principles and scale of the RADAR tool for the established approaches, their deployment and assessment and subsequent refinement activities, which enabled a comparison of the results across regulations. RADAR Scale (Assessment of the EFQM Quality Standards) Recognised as a global role model Fully able to Able to Limited ability to Unable to RADAR Scale (manipulated for the assessment of regulations) Recognised as a global role model Fully able to Able to 3 Limited ability to Unable to Evaluation of Approaches Evaluation of Deployment Evaluation of Assessment & Refinement RADAR scale RADAR scale RADAR scale RADAR scale 1: Unable to 2: Limited ability to 3: Able to 4: Fully able to 5: Recognised as global role model RADAR scale 1: Unable to 2: Limited ability to 3: Able to 4: Fully able to 5: Recognised as global role model Table A4.1 Principles of RADAR used to conduct the self-evaluation outcomes RADAR scale 1: Unable to 2: Limited ability to 3: Able to 4: Fully able to 5: Recognised as global role model 3 Any Condition which is identified lower than this point on the scale is classed as non-compliant for the purpose of reporting to the regulators SAR 2014 Page 80 of 153

91 Outcomes of the self-evaluation are summarised in the table below and further analysed in the following pages. Summary of self-evaluation outcomes against regulations (2014) RADAR Scale (Manipulated for Assessment of the Regulations) Ofqual General Conditions of Recognition (November, 2014) Welsh Government General Conditions of Recognition (March, 2014) Recognised as a global role model 0% (0 areas) 0% (0 areas) 0% (0 areas) Fully able to 49% (22 areas) 42% (22 areas) 13% (2 areas) SQA Accreditation s Regulatory Principles (2014) Able to 49% (30 areas) 58% (31 areas) 87% (13 areas) Limited ability to 0% (0 areas) 0% (0 areas) 0% (0 areas) Unable to 0% (0 areas) 0% (0 areas) 0% (0 areas) Not applicable 2% (1 area) 2% (1 area) 0% (0 areas) Table A4.2 Summary of self-evaluation outcomes It must be noted that although at the current time our levels against the Ofqual General Conditions of Recognition is 100%, throughout 2014 there has been a fluctuation on our levels with regards to conditions A8, B3, G6 and G8. Compliance improvement activities have therefore been undertaken to reinstate our levels. A more detailed progress report as part of the selfevaluation summary is provided in table A4.3. On the basis that Ofqual was the regulator for England, Wales and Northern Ireland until 2013, all records until 2014 can be sourced from the Ofqual Conditions Compliance Matrix. Our levels against the Qualification Wales General Conditions of Recognition in 2014 are 100%. Our levels against the SQA Accreditation Principles is 100%, however throughout 2014 there has been a fluctuation on our levels with regards to principles P07, P09, P10, P12 and P14. Compliance improvement activities have therefore been undertaken to reinstate our levels. SAR 2014 Page 81 of 153

92 Self-evaluation outcomes against Ofqual General Conditions of Recognition (November 2014) Condition Number A1 A2 A3 Condition Title Suitability for continuing recognition Establishment in the EU or the EFTA Safeguards on change of control Controls and Informal A4 Conflicts of interest A5 A6 A7 A8 Availability of adequate resources and arrangements Identification and management of risks Management of incidents Mal and maladministration Compliance Status Able to Fully able to Fully able to Able to Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Able to Compliance Summary Acceptable Good Good Acceptable Good Good Good Acceptable Compliance Progress Report 2014: No fluctuation of levels. No related incidents and minimal improvement activity. Compliance was therefore maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. Improvement activities were identified and included improved evaluation of adverse effects and creation of standardised notification tools. Compliance was maintained. 2014: Compliance levels decreased resultant of the Ofqual Mal Thematic Review which detected poor on evaluation of potential adverse effects and related notifications to regulators. Compliance improvement activities included internal auditing of incidents to improve initial evaluations and to create standardised reporting tools. The improvement activities reinstated the levels. SAR 2014 Page 82 of 153

93 Condition Number Condition Title Controls Compliance Status Compliance Summary Compliance Progress Report B1 The role of the responsible officer and Informal Fully able to Good 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. B2 The annual statement to Ofqual Fully able to Good 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. B3 Notification to Ofqual of certain events Able to Acceptable 2014: Compliance levels decreased resultant of the Ofqual Mal Thematic Review which detected poor on evaluation of potential adverse effects and related notifications to regulators. Compliance improvement activities included internal auditing of incidents to improve initial evaluations and to create standardised reporting tools. The improvement activities reinstated the levels. B4 Notice to provide information to Ofqual Fully able to Good 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. B5 Representations regarding qualifications Able to Acceptable 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. B6 Cooperation with Ofqual Fully able to Good 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. B7 Compliance with Regulatory Documents Fully able to Good 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. B8 Compliance with undertakings given to Ofqual Fully able to Good 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. SAR 2014 Page 83 of 153

94 Condition Number Condition Title Controls Compliance Status Compliance Summary Compliance Progress Report C1 Arrangements with third parties Able to Acceptable 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. C2 Arrangements with centres Able to Acceptable 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. D1 Fitness for purpose of qualifications Fully able to Good 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. D2 Accessibility of qualifications Fully able to Good 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. D3 Reviewing approach and Informal Able to Acceptable 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. D4 Responding to enquiries and complaints procedures Fully able to Good 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. D5 Compliance of qualifications with Regulatory Documents Fully able to Good 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. D6 Compliance of units developed by others with Regulatory Documents Fully able to Good 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. D7 Management of the withdrawal of qualifications Able to Acceptable 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. SAR 2014 Page 84 of 153

95 Condition Number Condition Title Controls Compliance Status Compliance Summary Compliance Progress Report D8 Management of the withdrawal of qualifications Able to Acceptable 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. E1 Qualifications having an objective and support Able to Acceptable 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. E2 Requirements on qualification titling Fully able to Good 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. E3 Publication of a qualification specification Fully able to Good 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. E4 Ensuring an assessment is fit for purpose and can be delivered Fully able to Good 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. E5 Assurance that qualifications comply with the conditions and Informal Able to Acceptable 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. F1 Information on fees and features of a qualification and Informal Able to Acceptable 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. F2 Packaging qualifications with other products or services Not applicable F3 Invoicing G1 Setting the assessment Not applicable Fully able to Fully able to Not applicable Good 2014: N/A 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. Good 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. SAR 2014 Page 85 of 153

96 Condition Number Condition Title Controls Compliance Status Compliance Summary Compliance Progress Report G2 Language of the assessment Fully able to Good 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. G3 Use of language and Stimulus Materials Fully able to Good 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. G4 Maintaining confidentiality of assessment materials, including the conduct of specified training events Able to Acceptable 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. G5 Registration of Learners Able to Acceptable 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. G6 Arrangements for Reasonable Adjustments Able to Acceptable 2014: Compliance levels decreased resultant of annual monitoring results which showed that some centres have never requested any reasonable adjustments. The improvement activity consisted of the redesign of qualification specifications to contain improved conditions and communication related to reasonable Adjustments. The improvement activity and subsequent monitoring reinstated the levels. G7 Arrangements for Special Consideration Able to Acceptable 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. G8 Completion of the assessment under the required conditions Able to Acceptable 2014: Compliance levels decreased after a tutor allowed professional discussion to be used on the L2CFQ. This was not deemed to be a valid assessment method for this qualification. Adverse effects were mitigated by having the portfolios reassessed and checks were made to ensure that this had not happened previously. The tutor was retrained as a improvement activity to prevent future occurrences. Risks were mitigated and levels were reinstated. G9 Delivering the assessment Able to Acceptable 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. SAR 2014 Page 86 of 153

97 Condition Number Condition Title Controls H1 Marking the assessment H2 H3 H4 H5 Moderation where an assessment is marked by a Centre Monitoring the specified levels of attainment for a qualification Adjudication by Ofqual of specified levels of attainment for a qualification Results for a qualification must be based on sufficient evidence H6 Issuing results I1 Appeals process I2 I3 I4 Compliance with Ofqual s appeals and complaints process The design and content of certificates Issuing certificates and replacement certificates Compliance Status Able to Able to Able to Able to Able to Able to Able to Able to Able to Able to Compliance Summary Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable Compliance Progress Report 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. J1 Interpretation and definitions and Informal Able to Acceptable 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. Table A4.3 Self-evaluation outcomes against Ofqual Conditions of Recognition SAR 2014 Page 87 of 153

98 Self-evaluation outcomes against Welsh Government General Conditions of Recognition (March 2014) Condition Number A1 A2 A3 Condition Title Controls Compliance status Suitability for continuing and Able to recognition Informal Establishment in the EU or the EFTA Safeguards on change of control A4 Conflicts of interest A5 A6 Availability of adequate resources and arrangements Identification and management of risks A7 Management of incidents A8 B1 B2 B3 B4 Mal and maladministration The role of the responsible officer The annual statement to Ofqual Notification to Ofqual of certain events Notice to provide information to Ofqual and Informal Fully able to Fully able to Able to Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Able to Fully able to Fully able to Able to Fully able to Compliance summary Acceptable Good Good Acceptable Good Good Good Acceptable Good Good Acceptable Good Compliance progress report 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. SAR 2014 Page 88 of 153

99 Condition Number B5 Condition Title Controls Compliance status Representations Able to regarding qualifications B6 Cooperation with Ofqual B7 B8 C1 C2 D1 D2 Compliance with Regulatory Documents Compliance with undertakings given to Ofqual Arrangements with third parties Arrangements with centres Fitness for purpose of qualifications Accessibility of qualifications D3 Reviewing approach and Informal D4 D5 D6 Responding to enquiries and complaints procedures Compliance of qualifications with Regulatory Documents Compliance of units developed by others with Regulatory Documents Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Able to Able to Fully able to Fully able to Able to Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Compliance summary Acceptable Good Good Good Acceptable Acceptable Good Good Acceptable Good Good Good Compliance progress report 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. SAR 2014 Page 89 of 153

100 Condition Number D7 D8 E1 E2 E3 E4 E5 F1 F2 Condition Title Controls Compliance status Management of the Able to withdrawal of qualifications Making available information to help teachers' needs Qualifications having an objective and support Requirements on qualification titling Publication of a qualification specification Ensuring an assessment is fit for purpose and can be delivered Assurance that qualifications comply with the conditions Information on fees and features of a qualification Packaging qualifications with other products or services and Informal and Informal Not applicable F3 Invoicing G1 Setting the assessment G2 Language of the assessment Able to Able to Fully able to Able to Fully able to Able to Able to Compliance summary Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable Good Acceptable Good Acceptable Acceptable Not applicable Not applicable Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Good Good Good Compliance progress report 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: N/A 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. SAR 2014 Page 90 of 153

101 Condition Number G3 G4 Condition Title Controls Compliance status Use of language and Fully able to Stimulus Materials Maintaining confidentiality of assessment materials, including the conduct of specified training events G5 Registration of Learners G6 G7 G8 G9 Arrangements for Reasonable Adjustments Arrangements for Special Consideration Completion of the assessment under the required conditions Delivering the assessment H1 Marking the assessment H2 H3 H4 Moderation where an assessment is marked by a Centre Monitoring the specified levels of attainment for a qualification Adjudication by Ofqual of specified levels of attainment for a qualification Able to Able to Able to Able to Able to Able to Able to Able to Able to Able to Compliance summary Good Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable Compliance progress report 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. SAR 2014 Page 91 of 153

102 Condition Number H5 Condition Title Controls Compliance status Results for a qualification Able to must be based on sufficient evidence H6 Issuing results I1 Appeals process I2 I3 I4 Compliance with Ofqual s appeals and complaints process The design and content of certificates Issuing certificates and replacement certificates Able to Able to Able to Able to Able to Compliance summary Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable Compliance progress report J1 Interpretation and and Able to Acceptable definitions Informal Table A4.3 Self-evaluation outcomes against Welsh Government Conditions of Recognition 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. SAR 2014 Page 92 of 153

103 Self-evaluation Summary SQA Accreditation s Regulatory Principles (2014) Principle SQA Principles 2014 Controls Compliance status Compliance Summary Compliance Progress Report P01 The awarding body shall have clearly defined and effective governance arrangements. Able to Acceptable 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. Compliance improvement activities were however deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle on the basis that Quickr Place was due to be updated in accordance with the SQA Principles. As a result was maintained. P02 The awarding body shall ensure it has the necessary resources to effectively carry out its operational functions to meet regulatory requirements. Able to Acceptable 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. P03 P04 The awarding body shall have clearly defined business planning processes which show evidence of management commitment, decision making and ongoing review. The awarding body shall continually review the effectiveness of its business services, systems, policies and processes. Fully able to Fully able to Good Good 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. P05 P06 The awarding body shall provide clear information on its procedures, products and services and ensure that they are accurate and appropriate to SQA accredited qualifications. The awarding body and its providers shall maintain accurate documents, records and data. Able to Able to Acceptable Acceptable 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. SAR 2014 Page 93 of 153

104 Principle SQA Principles 2014 Controls Compliance status Compliance Summary Compliance Progress Report P07 The awarding body shall have effective arrangements for communicating with its staff, stakeholders and SQA Accreditation. Able to Acceptable 2014: Compliance levels decreased on the basis that 1st4sport policy (position statements) do not accurately and consistently reference the regulators nor do they include the 1st4sport mission statement. These were reviewed as a improvement activity. The improvement activity reinstated levels. P08 The awarding body shall ensure that SQA Accreditation is granted access to all information pertaining to SQA accredited qualifications. Able to Acceptable 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. P09 P10 The awarding body shall ensure that it has robust systems and processes for the identification, design, development, implementation and review of qualifications, which meet the needs of users. The awarding body shall ensure that it has the necessary arrangements and resources for the effective delivery, assessment and quality assurance of SQA accredited qualifications. Able to Able to Acceptable Acceptable 2014: Compliance levels decreased resultant of information gained from the SQA Audit 2014, which identified that a 1st4sport centre could not evidence standardisation activities. Compliance improvement activities included the request for the centre to commence conducting regular standardisation activities. This was then monitored via Athena, the 1st4sport QA System. The improvement activities reinstated the levels. 2014: Compliance levels decreased resultant of information gained from the SQA Audit 2014, which detected that a small number of assessor occupational competence qualifications, assessor trainer qualifications and up to date continual professional development records could not be evidenced by a particular centre. Compliance improvement activities included placing relevant centres under action plan requesting that assessor occupational competence qualifications, assessor trainer qualifications and continual professional development records are uploaded into Athena, the 1st4sport quality assurance system. The centres were supported and checks conducted via Athena to ensure centre actions were completed. An e-bulletin was prepared to be sent to all recognised centres to request that the workforce competency and CPD evidence is being uploaded into Athena. The e-bulletin was also sent to all EVs to enforce checks. The improvement activities reinstated the improvement activities. SAR 2014 Page 94 of 153

105 Principle SQA Principles 2014 Controls Compliance status Compliance Summary Compliance Progress Report P11 P12 P13 P14 P15 The awarding body shall ensure that its qualifications and their assessment are inclusive and accessible to learners. The awarding body and its providers shall have open and transparent systems to manage complaints. The awarding body and its providers shall have clear, fair and equitable procedures to manage appeals. The awarding body and its providers shall ensure that it has safeguards to prevent and manage cases of mal and maladministration. The awarding body and its providers shall ensure that it has safeguards to prevent and manage cases of mal and maladministration. Able to Able to Able to Able to Able to Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable Table A4.4 Self-evaluation outcomes against SQA Accreditation s Regulatory Principles (2014) 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: Compliance levels decreased resultant of information gained from the SQA Audit Compliance improvement activities included the redesign of the complaints position statements. The improvement activities reinstated the levels. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 2014: Compliance levels decreased resultant of information gained from the SQA Audit 2014, which detected that maladministration was not evidenced in any policy at a centre. Compliance improvement activities included a review of the current Maladministration/ Mal Policy template provided to centres and referred to maladministration with an accurate definition and related handling and investigation processes. Relevant centres were placed under action plan requesting that the revised template is branded appropriately and implemented via effective communication to 1st4sport, centre staff and learners. Checks were made via Athena and via electronic means to ensure that centre actions have been completed. The improvement activities reinstated the levels. 2014: No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. SAR 2014 Page 95 of 153

106 Appendix 5 Benchmarking Outcomes from our benchmarking activities following our participation in the Federation of Awarding Bodies (FAB) scheme, which enabled awarding organisations to become part of a brokerage group with other awarding organisations, are presented below. For confidentiality purposes, the names of the organisations involved within the brokerage group are not named, no details are supplied and all information related to the brokerage group is maintained securely. The sole information made available for the purpose of this report is related to those areas identified by 1st4sport as having been benchmarked and the 1st4sport Senior Management Team response to the benchmarking outcomes. This confirms our strengths and areas for improvement (in which cases action plans have been devised). Benchmarking Activities (2014) Title Objectives Activities Outcome Results Outcome details Data collection on the nine protected characteristics (Equality Act 2010) To benchmark across AOs on Data collection on the nine protected characteristics - Equality Act 2010 specifically: 1. data collection at registration on the grounds of all nine protected characteristics under the Equality act? 2. expectations on centres to collect this data from learners? The benchmarking activity consisted of the collection of testimonies from a range of awarding organisations in light of the objective above. Objectives met Best AOs continue to have data collection in place of systems which were set up some time ago. Until is it mandatory it is unlikely that AOs will change. 1st4sport will continue to collect data as current as it is not mandatory at this time to collect more even if it is perceived to be best. Assessment Data Retention To identify benchmarks across AOs related to the following question: In respect of external assessment results, once these have been added to the learners overall achievements and a certificate for the qualification has been awarded to the learner, would you keep those exam results indefinitely? The benchmarking activity consisted of the collection of testimonies from a range of awarding organisations in light of the objective above. Objectives met Best AOs are maintaining records electronically indefinitely or at least for a significant number of years. Assessment papers are maintained as a minimum for three years. As 1st4sport maintain all assessment papers for a minimum of five years and all records electronically indefinitely this is deemed best. Centres Withholding Certificates To identify benchmarks across AOs related to the following question: What action should be taken in the event that a centre withholds certificates as a result of a learner failing to pay their fees. The benchmarking activity consisted of the collection of testimonies from a range of awarding organisations in light of the objective above. Objectives met Practice appropriate to our operation The outcomes show that our processes are deemed compliant. On this basis no improvements are needed at this time. SAR 2014 Page 96 of 153

107 Title Objectives Activities Outcome Results Outcome details Certificates to Centres To identify benchmarks across AOs related to the following questions: 1. Are you requiring your centres to use ULNs for QCF units/qualifications? Do you accept learner registrations without them? 2. What do you charge for replacement certificates? Is your charge based on individual certificates only? What do you do if a centre requests a large batch of replacements? 3. Do you allow centres a certain % of error on certificates before starting to charge them for replacements? The benchmarking activity consisted of the collection of testimonies from a range of awarding organisations in light of the objective above. Objectives met Practice requires improvement AOs are current accepting registrations without ULNs at the current time on the basis that it has not been confirmed as a formal retirement. The exception appears to be on functional skills where ULNs were required for the diploma when it was available. Whilst the majority of 1st4sport processes here appear compliant, we need to investigate the ULN as a mandatory functional skills requirement. When functional skills were a component of the Diploma, we collected ULNs, as the Diploma no longer exists, we need to ascertain whether the collection of ULNs for functional skills remains mandatory. Guided Learning Hours To benchmark across AO's on Guided Learning Hours. The benchmarking activity consisted of the collection of testimonies from a range of awarding organisations in light of the objective above. Objectives met Best AOs are required to add guided learning hours to their qualifications in the usual way through the RITS system. 1st4sport will continue to do this until further notice from the regulator. Learner Penalties for Plagiarism To identify benchmarks across AOs related to penalties for learners in the event that: 1. Hacked into another learners online account 2. Plagiarised this learners work. 3. If a 12 month ban is appropriate The benchmarking activity consisted of the collection of testimonies from a range of awarding organisations in light of the objective above. Objectives met Practice appropriate to our operation This situation did occur at 1st4sport and the incident was investigated. The learner admitted that he created the fake certificate electronically. He has apologised and confirmed that the electronic copy of the certificate will be deleted and it will not happen again. He will also need to complete the outstanding units on MTD before being eligible for certification. The learner s details were also added to the 1st4sport Intelligence Logs for residual risk monitoring purposes. Based upon the benchmarking outcomes this action is deemed acceptable. SAR 2014 Page 97 of 153

108 Title Objectives Activities Outcome Results Outcome details Level 3 Award in Assessing Vocationally Related Achievement (QCF) Content To source the AO benchmarks for the assessment methods and content A review information across other AO websites to source benchmarks in light of the objectives listed above. Objectives met Best AOs appear to be working directly in line with the Sector Qualifications Strategy. What appears to be an issue related to the qualification standard is the wording of the information provided LSIS the SSC which developed this area. As a result the 1stsport Assessment specification is deemed to be appropriate and no changes to this will be made. The assessment tools however will continue to be reviewed for fitness for purpose. Notifications to AOs To discover understand the nature, type and timing of awarding organization notifications. The benchmarking activity consisted of the collection of testimonies from a range of awarding organisations in light of the objective above. Objectives met Practice requires improvement A review of the high level summary will be complete after each set of regulatory feedback. This will ensure continuous improvement in this area. The notifications to AOs will remain the same. Retention of Achievement Data To identify benchmarks across AOs related to the following questions: For how long do AOs store old certificate records. The benchmarking activity consisted of the collection of testimonies from a range of awarding organisations in light of the objective above. Objectives met Best AOs are maintaining records. As 1st4sport maintain all records electronically our is appropriate. Scanned PDF Certificates to Support Centre Administration To identify benchmarks across AOs related to the following question: Is it appropriate to send a scanned PDF of the certificate to centres for admin purposes? Table A5.1 Areas of benchmarking activities The benchmarking activity consisted of the collection of testimonies from a range of awarding organisations in light of the objective above. Objectives met Practice appropriate to our operation It is not appropriate to reissue the certificate as it would then be a replacement. Replacements should only be given to learners as a replacement. On the basis that 1st4sport have an alternative solution in place with the certificate request process from centres, this is deemed best and no chances are required. 1st4sport processes are deemed appropriate and in line with standards across AOs. On this basis no improvements are needed at this time. SAR 2014 Page 98 of 153

109 Percentage Percentage Appendix 6 Stakeholder satisfaction levels Outcomes of the stakeholder survey, which identify satisfaction levels based on our performance and services are presented in four parts: the awarding organisation, quality management, qualification provision, awarding services and awarding systems. A6.1 Stakeholder satisfaction levels - The Awarding Organisation 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport is managed effectively with clear lines of accountability operating within a culture of excellence 60% 48% 40% 32% 33% 27% 29% 28% 27% 21% 18% 10% 11% 8% 3% 0% 3% 3% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known Chart A6.1 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport is managed effectively with clear lines of accountability operating within a culture of excellence 1st4sport's reputation and image within the education industry is very positive 60% 55% 53% 48% 50% 40% 31% 36% 32% 33% 33% 30% 18% 20% 12% 11% 13% 7% 8% 10% 2% 4% 5% 0% 0% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses Chart A6.2 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport s reputation and image within the education industry is very positive To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known SAR 2014 Page 99 of 153

110 Percentage Percentage 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 28% 1st4sport ensure the development and maintenance of effective business relationships with stakeholders resulting in business loyalty 47% 53% 36% 29% 30% 25% 15% 13% 7% 7% 8% 8% 7% 3% 4% 3% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses Chart A6.3 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure the development and maintenance of effective business relationships with its stakeholders, resulting in business loyalty 33% 47% To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known 1st4sport embrace ethical, environmental, legal and regulatory responsibility throughout its activities 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 63% 46% 47% 40% 42% 33% 25% 21% 23% 8% 11% 13% 7% 10% 5% 0% 0% 0% 0% 7% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known Chart A6.4 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport embrace ethical, environmental, legal and regulatory responsibility throughout its activities SAR 2014 Page 100 of 153

111 Percentage Percentage 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport provides qualifications that are of value to each learner's career/role and therefore contribute to society 47% 38% 54% 29% 11% 11% 1% 3% 4% 4% Chart A6.5 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport s provide qualifications that are of value in learner s career/role and therefore contribute to the society 70% 25% 5% 27% 60% 13% 0% 0% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport provide the industries within which we operate with a quality-assured and cost-effective qualification awarding service 41% 43% 29% 50% 11% 11% 11% 4% 1% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses 65% Chart A6.6 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport provide the industries within which we operate with a quality-assured and cost-effective qualification awarding service 25% 3% 5% 3% 27% 60% 13% 0% 0% To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known SAR 2014 Page 101 of 153

112 Percentage Percentage 1st4sport operate in a fair and equitable manner 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 75% 51% 50% 53% 40% 36% 33% 15% 11% 13% 3% 2% 5% 4% 5% 0% 3% 3% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known Responses Chart A6.7 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport operate in a fair and equitable manner 1st4sport deliver professional services 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 50% 39% 39% 39% 9% 21% Chart A6.8 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport deliver professional services 70% 7% 1% 1% 0% 0% 3% 3% 0% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses 25% 33% 60% To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known SAR 2014 Page 102 of 153

113 Percentage Percentage 1st4sport promote teamwork 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 65% 53% 34% 35% 36% 36% 33% 23% 15% 13% 14% 13% 3% 7% 7% 5% 5% 3% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known Responses Chart A6.9 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport promote teamwork 1st4sport are open to learn 70% 60% 58% To The Full Extent 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 40% 34% 29% 32% 33% 29% 30% 27% 21% 18% 15% 11% 7% 4% 3% 5% 5% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known Chart A6.10 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport are open to learn SAR 2014 Page 103 of 153

114 Percentage Percentage 1st4sport preserve a personal touch 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 60% 53% 38% 39% 40% 30% 32% 25% 30% 19% 6% 8% 7% 4% 0% 3% 5% 3% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known Responses Chart A6.11 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport preserve a personal touch 1st4sport try to maintain a sense of humour and have fun 70% 60% 63% To The Full Extent 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 40% 40% 33% 32% 32% 28% 22% 21% 23% 20% 11% 6% 7% 7% 5% 5% 5% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known Responses Chart A6.12 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport try to maintain a sense of humour and have fun SAR 2014 Page 104 of 153

115 Percentage Percentage A6.2 Stakeholder satisfaction levels - Quality Management 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport has improved over the last year in meeting stakeholder needs/expectations and providing value added service 53% To The Full Extent 40% 37% 35% 29% 25% 22% 18% 19% 18% 18% 18% 11% 5% 3% 5% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses Chart A6.13 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport has improved over the last year in meeting stakeholder needs/expectations and providing value added service 7% 27% 0% 13% To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport quality assure the delivery of our qualifications through effective internal and external verification 80% 46% 33% 32% 36% 30% 21% 16% 11% 13% 7% 1% 4% 0% 3% 3% 0% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff 65% Responses To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known Chart A6.14 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport quality assure the delivery of our qualifications through effective internal and external verification SAR 2014 Page 105 of 153

116 Percentage Percentage 1st4sport manage risk via the implementation and monitoring of effective action plans for centres 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 42% 29% 32% 21% 25% 14% 13% 14% 7% 1% Chart A6.15 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport manage risk via the implementation and monitoring of effective action plans 65% 23% 73% 20% 8% 5% 7% 0% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known A6.3 Stakeholder satisfaction levels Qualification Provision 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport develop, deliver and award qualifications that meet the needs of end users (learners, centres, employers) 48% 34% 36% 36% 25% 65% 14% 5% 7% 1% 3% 4% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Chart A6.16 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport develop, deliver and award qualifications that meet the needs of end users (learners, centres, employers) 30% Responses 27% 67% To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known SAR 2014 Page 106 of 153

117 Percentage Percentage 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport ensure that the title, size, structure and content of qualifications are clear, use appropriate language and are fit for purpose 67% 58% To The Full Extent 45% To A Large Extent 39% 35% 27% 29% 29% To Some Extent 22% 20% 13% Not At All 2% 4% 4% 0% 5% 3% 0% 0% 0% Not Known Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses Chart A6.17 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure that the title, size, structure and content of qualifications are clear, use appropriate language and are fit for purpose 70% 67% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport ensure qualification resources are clear and effective for the use of centre staff and learners 45% 48% 43% 27% 29% 29% 25% 21% 20% 11% 7% 8% 3% 4% 3% To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent 13% Not At All 0% 0% 0% Not Known Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses Chart A6.18 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure qualification resources are clear and effective for the use of centre staff and learners SAR 2014 Page 107 of 153

118 Percentage Percentage 1st4sport clearly define the assessment, the level of difficulty and the way in which it should be carried out 70% 67% To The Full Extent 60% 50% 50% 46% 43% To A Large Extent 40% 40% 28% 29% To Some Extent 30% 22% 20% 20% 14% 13% Not At All 10% 6% 7% 10% 1% 4% 0% 0% 0% 0% Not Known 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses Chart A6.19 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport clearly define the assessment, level of difficulty and the way in which it should be carried out 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport ensure assessment guidance clearly confirms the standards of knowledge and performance required by learners 67% To The Full Extent 50% 50% 39% 43% To A Large Extent 31% 32% 24% 27% To Some Extent Not At All 11% 8% 7% 2% 5% 7% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% Not Known Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses Chart A6.20 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure assessment guidance clearly confirms the standards of knowledge and performance required by learners SAR 2014 Page 108 of 153

119 Percentage Percentage 1st4sport assessment methods and tools do not create barriers to access or learner achievement 70% 60% 58% To The Full Extent 50% 43% 47% To A Large Extent 40% 33% 36% 35% 33% To Some Extent 30% 25% 25% 22% 20% 20% Not At All 10% 6% 4% 4% 4% 5% 3% 0% 0% 0% Not Known 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses Chart A6.21 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport assessment methods and tools do not create barriers to access or learner achievement 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport promote equality ensuring barriers to access are identified and mitigated through needs based access arrangements 42% 43% 35% 32% 68% 20% 16% 11% 11% 13% 13% 6% 2% 4% 0% 0% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses 33% 53% To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known Chart A6.22 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport promote equality ensuring barriers to access are identified and mitigated through needs based access arrangements SAR 2014 Page 109 of 153

120 Percentage Percentage A6.4 Stakeholder satisfaction levels Awarding Services 50% 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% 1st4sport ensure that information on awarding services, qualification, features and fees are easily accessible with clear pricing structures 48% 41% 29% 29% 18% 4% 8% 36% 35% 14% 7% 14% Chart A6.23 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure that information on awarding services, qualification, features and fees are easily accessible with clear pricing structures 3% 10% 5% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses 33% 27% 40% 0% 0% To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known 50% 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% 1st4sport ensure that any increase in fees is communicated a reasonable timeframe in advance to enable centres to plan accordingly 47% 40% To The Full Extent 37% 35% 33% 27% 29% To A Large Extent 28% 24% 25% 25% To Some Extent 14% 13% 10% Not At All 7% 2% 3% 3% 0% 0% Not Known Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses Chart A6.24 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure that any increase in fees is communicated a reasonable timeframe in advance to enable centres to plan accordingly SAR 2014 Page 110 of 153

121 Percentage Percentage 1st4sport ensure effective communication across stakeholders via regular newsletters 70% 60% 60% 60% To The Full Extent 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 41% 27% 25% 29% 25% 28% 27% 12% 15% 14% 5% 7% 3% 10% 7% 7% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known Responses Chart A6.25 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure effective communication across stakeholders via regular newsletters 1st4sport ensure a response to enquiries within 5 working days 70% 60% 60% 49% 50% 39% 40% 33% 32% 35% 30% 25% 25% 21% 18% 18% 20% 20% 13% 8% 10% 5% 7% 2% 4% 3% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses Chart A6.26 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure a response to enquiries within 5 working days To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known SAR 2014 Page 111 of 153

122 Percentage Percentage 50% 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% 1st4sport ensure requests for course/programme authorisation are processed and confirmed within 5 working days of receipt 40% 32% 28% 29% 23% 21% 8% 11% 7% 1% Chart A6.27 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure requests for course/programme authorisation are processed and confirmed within 5 working days of receipt 45% 33% 20% 20% 3% 33% 33% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses 13% To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport ensure learner/workforce resources are dispatched at a minimum of 10 working days prior to the start date of the course/programme 67% To The Full Extent 45% To A Large Extent 40% 34% 32% 30% 25% 25% 27% To Some Extent 18% 11% 14% Not At All 11% 7% 5% 7% 1% 3% 0% 0% Not Known Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses Chart A6.28 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure learner/workforce resources are dispatched at a minimum of 10 working days prior to the start date of the course/programme SAR 2014 Page 112 of 153

123 Percentage Percentage 1st4sport ensure learner registrations are processed within 20 working days of receipt 60% 50% 50% 47% 40% 40% 37% 36% 33% 33% 29% 30% 20% 21% 20% 11% 13% 13% 10% 4% 5% 7% 4% 0% 0% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses Chart A6.29 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure learner registrations are processed within 20 working days of receipt To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport ensure claims for certification are validated, processed and dispatched within 20 working days of receipt 53% To The Full Extent 39% 31% 8% 22% 29% 25% 18% 0% 0% 29% 40% Chart A6.30 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure claims for certification are validated, processed and dispatched within 20 working days of receipt 38% 27% 13% 13% 5% 5% 7% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known SAR 2014 Page 113 of 153

124 Percentage Percentage 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport ensure request for replacement certificates are validated, processed and dispatched within 10 working days of receipt 31% 29% 7% 33% 25% 25% 11% 0% 0% 39% 38% Chart A6.31 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure request for replacement certificates are validated, processed and dispatched within 10 working days of receipt 45% 27% 60% 13% 10% 3% 5% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% 1st4sport ensure written assessment papers are dispatched at a minimum of 5 working days prior to the specified date on the request 43% 39% 40% 40% 38% 35% To The Full Extent 31% 28% To A Large Extent 25% 25% 6% 7% 0% 4% 10% 10% Chart A6.32 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure written assessment papers are dispatched at a minimum of 5 working days prior to the specified date on the request 7% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses 13% To Some Extent Not At All Not Known SAR 2014 Page 114 of 153

125 Percentage Percentage 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport ensure cancellation/postponement/termination requests are processed within 10 working days prior to the specified date 53% 48% To The Full Extent 34% 27% 35% 29% 25% 39% 38% 13% 7% 8% 8% 7% 4% 0% 0% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses 27% To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known Chart A6.33 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure cancellation/postponement/termination requests are processed within 10 working days prior to the specified date 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport ensure learner transferral/withdrawal requests are processed within 10 working days prior to the specified date 53% 48% To The Full Extent 37% 32% 26% 29% 25% 39% Chart A6.34 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure learner transferral/withdrawal requests are processed within 10 working days 38% 13% 10% 5% 7% 5% 7% 0% 0% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses 27% To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known SAR 2014 Page 115 of 153

126 Percentage Percentage A6.5 Stakeholder satisfaction levels Awarding Systems 1st4sport ensure current and relevant information for centres and learner is provided via the website 70% 61% 58% To The Full Extent 60% 50% 43% To A Large Extent 39% 40% 32% 28% 29% To Some Extent 30% 25% 18% 20% 13% 13% Not At All 11% 11% 10% 8% 10% 2% 0% 0% 0% 0% Not Known 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses Chart A6.35 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure current and relevant information for centres and learners is provided via the website 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport have effectively designed and implemented online course authorisation, learner registration and certification services 38% 35% 36% 29% 18% 18% 11% 8% 7% 2% 38% 33% Chart A6.36 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport have effectively designed and implemented online course authorisation, learner registration and certification services 10% 20% 20% 53% 27% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses 0% To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known SAR 2014 Page 116 of 153

127 Percentage 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport have effectively designed and implemented a web based quality assurance system (Athena/Creatio) 34% 30% 25% 25% 19% 21% 18% 13% 11% 4% 48% 40% Chart A6.37 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport have effectively designed and implemented a web based quality assurance system (Athena/Creatio) 61% 39% 8% 5% 0% 0% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known SAR 2014 Page 117 of 153

128 Outcomes from the analysis of the qualitative feedback provided by stakeholders via the annual survey are presented in table A6.1. General Inductive Analysis (Patton, 1990) - Qualitative Data (stakeholder satisfaction survey 2014) Raw data Theme First Order Theme Second order theme Global Dimensions 1st4sport is a supportive and friendly organisation which continues to offer excellent service to centres, learners and external verifiers and quality products 1st4sport staff are always responsive, professional, friendly and willing to help External verifiers receive great support with the introduction of the CEV role and find the meetings beneficial Insufficient communication and personal touch by EVs to centres in order to plan/conduct a visit The amount of visits conducted at some centres may exceed the required and can cause burden 1st4sport and its staff provide a responsive and professional service 1st4sport EQA approach requires improvement; despite the effective launch of the CEV role and EV support to centres 1st4sport has a good reputation; despite continuous communication concerns 1st4sport, its staff and its qualifications have a sound reputation; to preserve this communication, assessment design and awarding services must be subject to PPS sessions to drive improvement Centres receive excellent support and guidance by EVs Effective tools to be used when communicating changes to centres related to the qualification specification and learner pack Some inconsistencies in communications from partners, EVs and internal staff 1st4sport communications continues to be an area for concern There is disparity on the appropriate length of coaching courses and there is a demand for the learning activities to be practically based Cost and qualification pre-requisites serve as barriers to access The qualifications are structured appropriately, however programmes and assessment strategies could be more responsible and flexible; with standardisation guidance provided 1st4sport Qualification development must include improved research into funding and industry needs, comparability tests, competitor analysis; the new TQT tool should also be deployed to help to rationalise decisions related to structure, cost and size 1st4sport Business Development Approach to be launched to address qualification issues SAR 2014 Page 118 of 153

129 Raw data Theme First Order Theme Second order theme Global Dimensions Poor packaging and unsatisfactory quality of learner resources Paper assessments should be replaced with electronic version to respond to the current technology needs Some assessment tasks/wording of questions on papers appear to be unclear, confusing and not in line with the integrated assessment procedure Assessment tools (observation checklists and portfolio tasks) impact on assessors as the structure and required annotation is extremely time consuming Minimal use of RPL for experienced individuals impacts negatively on the professionalism of the industry 1st4sport assessments and related resources require improvement Assessment design and awarding services must be placed under review 1st4sport, its staff and its qualifications have a sound reputation; to preserve this communication, assessment design and awarding services must be subject to PPS sessions to drive improvement Technology is having a negative impact on the uptake on coaching courses, which should be predominately practical Learner resources should be more user friendly with more visual tools (pictures/diagrams) to reduce barriers to less confident learners There is a need for funded qualifications in line with national initiatives and which meet the needs of centres Learner re-registration fees frustrate some customers Learners have provided positive feedback on the layout of exams; however the booking system is not user friendly and should be completed on line 1st4sport approach to value added services must be developed with the aim to improve our awarding service Timescales for booking external test papers are lengthy Centre recognition process and EV services require improvement Errors reported with learner certificates being sent to the wrong centre and outstanding SPC certificates Table A6.1 Stakeholder satisfaction survey outcomes from qualitative data SAR 2014 Page 119 of 153

130 Appendix 7 Learner Satisfaction Levels Following last year s poor response there has been an increase in the response rate in The poor response resulted from the business decision to change from paper based learner evaluation forms to electronic forms. Consequently, we reverted back to using paper based evaluation forms in May Although the rate was not as high as in the years between the response in 2014 covered only an eight month period, based on the launch of paper based forms in May, as opposed to 12 month covered in previous years. Trends in the number of learner responses received ( ) Trends in learner response rate ( ) 25,000 40% 20,000 19,540 19,904 19,190 17,000 35% 30% 30% 32% 31% 27% 15,000 10,000 5,000 5,100 10,616 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 8% 16% 0 0% Year Year Chart A7.1 Responses received via the learner evaluation form Chart A7.2 Response rate of certificated learners Overall value of 1st4sport qualifications as identified by learners (2013) Average 2% Poor 1% Very Good Good 20% Good Very Good 77% Average Poor Chart A7.3 Value of 1st4sport qualifications as identified by learners SAR 2014 Page 120 of 153

131 Number of learners Number of learners Number of learners In order to identify the levels of customer/end user loyalty to our services and the value of our products a statistical analysis was undertaken to establish the number of learners (60,239) that obtained more than one of our qualifications in The largest number of 1st4sport Qualifications obtained by a learner is ,000 60,000 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 0 Number of learners that have obtained multiple 1st4sport qualifications (2014) 60,239 12,220 3,110 1, Number of qualifications obtained by learners Chart A7.4 Learners with multiple 1st4sport qualifications (2014) Number of learners that have obtained multiple 1st4sport qualifications (2013) Number of learners that have obtained multiple 1st4sport qualifications (2012) 60,000 53,601 50,000 44,898 50,000 40,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 10,662 2, ,000 20,000 10,000 8,807 1, Number of qualifications obtained by learners Number of qualifications obtained by learners Chart A7.5 Learners with multiple 1st4sport qualifications (2013) Chart A7.6 Learners with multiple 1st4sport qualifications (2012) SAR 2014 Page 121 of 153

132 Appendix 8 1st4sport Employee Satisfaction Levels In table A8.1 responses provided by the 1st4sport employees and the Executive Management Team (EMT) are shown separately, in order to present the different perceptions and levels of satisfaction. Charts A8.1 A8.4 show the results from both respondent types grouped together. Employee satisfaction levels (2014) Statements Respondent To the full extent To a large extent To some extent Not at all Line management is effective, increases employees motivation and helps them fulfil their role There are sufficient opportunities for employees further learning, development and career growth Employees are involved in the relevant areas and empowered to implement improvements/take initiatives Employees are provided with sufficient training to undertake their role effectively Employees receive recognition and genuine appreciation for their contributions Employees are respected, valued and treated equally There are appropriate and sufficient resources to help employees undertake their daily activities The current building/facilities are of high-quality The organisational culture and working environment conditions are very fulfilling Communication is effective and employees are aware of overall objectives and/or changes made Ethics, code of conduct and processes are appropriate Overall employees are very satisfied/fulfilled with their job Table A8.1 Employee satisfaction levels Employees 17% 28% 44% 6% EMT 29% 43% 0% 0% Employees 6% 6% 61% 22% EMT 14% 43% 14% 0% Employees 6% 17% 72% 0% EMT 14% 57% 0% 0% Employees 6% 56% 28% 6% EMT 29% 43% 0% 0% Employees 0% 22% 61% 11% EMT 14% 57% 0% 0% Employees 22% 28% 44% 0% EMT 57% 14% 0% 0% Employees 6% 50% 22% 17% EMT 29% 43% 0% 0% Employees 6% 17% 61% 11% EMT 29% 43% 0% 0% Employees 0% 33% 56% 6% EMT 43% 29% 0% 0% Employees 0% 28% 61% 6% EMT 14% 57% 0% 0% Employees 6% 61% 28% 0% EMT 57% 14% 0% 0% Employees 6% 33% 44% 11% EMT 29% 43% 0% 0% SAR 2014 Page 122 of 153

133 Percentage The number of areas where employees appear to be dissatisfied have increased since The greatest dissatisfaction expressed by employees is in relation to: the opportunities for further learning, development and career growth (83% dissatisfaction rate) the employees involvement in relevant areas and empowerment to implement improvements/take initiatives (72% dissatisfaction rate) the company s recognition and genuine appreciation for the employees contributions (72% dissatisfaction rate) the quality of the current building/facilities (72% dissatisfaction rate) the organisational culture and working environment conditions (62% dissatisfaction rate) the communication and employees awareness of overall objectives and/or changes made (67% dissatisfaction rate). 1st4sport employee satisfaction levels (part one) 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 23% 36% 36% 5% Line management is effective, increases employees motivation and helps them fulfil their role 55% 18% 18% 9% 9% There are sufficient opportunities for employees further learning, development and career growth 32% 59% 0% Employees are involved in the relevant areas and empowered to implement improvements/take initiatives To the full extent To a large extent To some extent Not at all Responses Chart A8.1 Employees and EMT responses on satisfaction with line management, personal development and involvement/empowerment SAR 2014 Page 123 of 153

134 Percentage Percentage 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 14% 59% 23% 5% Employees are provided with sufficient training to undertake their role effectively 1st4sport employee satisfaction levels (part two) 5% 36% 50% 9% Employees receive recognition and genuine appreciation for their contributions Chart A8.2 Employees and EMT responses on satisfaction with training, recognition and respect, and available resources 36% 27% 36% 0% Employees are respected, valued and treated equally Responses 14% 55% 18% 14% There are appropriate and sufficient resources to help employees undertake their daily activities To the full extent To a large extent To some extent Not at all 1st4sport employee satisfaction levels (part three) 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 27% 50% 14% 14% 9% The current building/facilities are of high-quality 36% 45% The organisational culture and working environment conditions are very fulfilling 41% 50% 5% 5% 5% Communication is effective and employees are aware of overall objectives and/or changes made 23% 55% 23% 0% Ethics, code of conduct and processes are appropriate To the full extent To a large extent To some extent Not at all Responses Chart A8.3 Employees and EMT responses on satisfaction with facilities, organisational culture, communication and ethics/code of conduct SAR 2014 Page 124 of 153

135 Percentage 1st4sport employee and EMT perceptions as to overall, whether employees are very satisfied/fulfilled with their job (2014) Not at all 9% To the full extent 14% To the full extent To a large extent To some extent 36% To a large extent 41% To some extent Not at all Chart A8.4 Employees and EMT responses on overall satisfaction/fulfilment working for 1st4sport Overall employee satisfaction levels showed a change in comparison to past years. Based on the employees responses the overall satisfaction levels appear to have decreased. 1st4sport employee responses to: 'Overall I am very satisfied/fulfilled with my job' ( ) 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 79% 14% 7% 0% 68% 66% 53% 56% 37% 23% 22% 22% 22% 5% 6% 6% 5% 5% 0% 0% 44% 33% 11% 6% To the full extent To a large extent To some extent Not at all Responses Chart A8.5 Trends in the levels of employee satisfaction across years (employee responses only EMT responses not included) SAR 2014 Page 125 of 153

136 Outcomes from the analysis of the qualitative feedback resultant of the employee satisfaction survey are presented in the following table. General Deductive Analysis - Qualitative Data (Employee satisfaction survey 2014) Category Deductive Themes Frequency of raw statistics Strengths Good benefits package. 1 Areas for development Revise and improve the organisational and team structure to support business needs, innovation and productivity, based on realigned roles. Revise the strategic direction and ensure it is communicated to all employees who will be working towards the achievement of the targets as a collective. Rationalise processes and systems to improve efficiency, and service levels. 2 Improve the organisational culture and integrate the three teams to ensure they work towards the same clear direction, which is defined and communicated by the top and middle management. Ensure the top management listen to what the employees have to say and have faith in them. 2 Recruit more staff to resolve the critical issue currently faced with insufficiency of resources and heavy workload, to ensure the organisation remains sustainable. Improve communication across levels of management and teams. 2 Ensure employees are empowered, valued, rewarded and supported more. 6 Increase the opportunities for career, personal development/training and growth. 4 Create initiatives for employees to work harder based on a reward scheme and provide the opportunity to get involved in additional areas in order to use their full potential. Ensure salaries are at the appropriate industry level and pay structure/rises are proportionate to the workload and hard work of the employees. Work with employees to target problematic areas and establish solutions. 2 Revise and improve the appraisal process. 1 Review and improve the external verification approach to ensure it is still relevant and remains in line with the strategic direction. Table A8.2 Analysis of the qualitative data resulted from the employee satisfaction survey SAR 2014 Page 126 of

137 Appendix 9 External Verifier Satisfaction Levels on Training Provision Feedback from external verifiers (inc. Coordinating EVs) and 1st4sport staff is collated via the Event Evaluation/Forum Feedback Form upon completion of training events. The following table and charts reflect the EV satisfaction levels on 1st4sport s provision of training compared to the perceptions of 1st4sport staff that have delivered and/or attended the event. Evaluation of 1st4sport training and standardisation events Evaluation areas Respondent type Very Good Good Fair Poor N/A The pre-event planning (agenda, documents, directions, structure, timetable and content) The overall organisation and management of the event/forum The use of materials-equipment provided for the needs of the event The time allocated to cover the agenda issues or any additional subjects The presentations by 1st4sport The extent to which the event met EV s requirements/personal objectives The opportunities to get involved in the event, raise concerns and provide feedback The opportunities (for EVs) to interact with 1st4sport staff External verifiers 61% 33% 3% 2% 2% 1st4sport staff 57% 29% 14% 0% 0% External verifiers 74% 21% 0% 2% 3% 1st4sport staff 43% 43% 14% 0% 0% External verifiers 62% 33% 2% 2% 2% 1st4sport staff 43% 57% 0% 0% 0% External verifiers 46% 44% 7% 2% 2% 1st4sport staff 57% 29% 14% 0% 0% External verifiers 75% 18% 3% 0% 3% 1st4sport staff 57% 43% 0% 0% 0% External verifiers 48% 38% 11% 2% 2% 1st4sport staff 71% 29% 0% 0% 0% External verifiers 64% 33% 0% 2% 2% 1st4sport staff 43% 57% 0% 0% 0% External verifiers 79% 18% 2% 2% 0% 1st4sport staff 71% 0% 0% 0% 29% Relevance of information provided and related implementation to the EV s area of work Table A10.1 Quantitative feedback on 1st4sport training events provided to EVs External verifiers 62% 28% 8% 2% 0% 1st4sport staff 71% 0% 0% 0% 29% SAR 2014 Page 127 of 153

138 EV evaluation outcomes on training events (2014) 1st4sport staff evaluation outcomes on training events (2014) Good 28% Good 34% Very good Very good Very good 72% Good Very good 66% Good Chart A10.1 Evaluation outcomes of 1st4sport training events provided to EVs SAR 2014 Page 128 of 153

139 Appendix 10 Qualification Specific Performance Statistics The following statistics indicate the demand for our qualifications (registrations, certifications, enquiries, recognition and qualification approval applications) and qualification specific information (actions imposed on centres, access arrangements and incidents). Qualifications with the largest registration and certification variance are highlighted in tables 11.1 and Data must be treated with caution as in some cases figures refer to NQF version of qualifications which were due their expiration date. 1st4sport trends in learner registrations per qualification ( ) Qualification Number of registered learners Change ( ) Count % L1AC5Q - Level 1 Award in Coaching Fives (QCF) % L1ACAQ - Level 1 Award In Coaching Angling (QCF) % L1ACARCQ - Level 1 Award In Coaching Archery (QCF) % L1ACBADQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Badminton (QCF) % L1ACBBQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Basketball (QCF) % L1ACBOCQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Boccia (QCF) N/A L1ACBOWLSQ - Level 1 Award In Coaching Bowls (QCF) % L1ACCQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Cycling (QCF) % L1ACCRQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Cricket (QCF) % L1ACFQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Football (QCF) % L1ACGQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Gymnastics (QCF) (all disciplines) % L1ACHQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Hockey (QCF) % L1ACJQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Judo (QCF) % L1ACLAXQ - Level 1 Award In Coaching Lacrosse (QCF) % L1ACNBQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Netball (QCF) % L1ACOQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Orienteering (QCF) % L1ACPKQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Parkour/ Freerunning (QCF) % L1ACRLQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Rugby League (QCF) % L1ACRONQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Rounders (QCF) % L1ACRUQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Rugby Union (QCF) % L1ACSCQ - Level 1 Award In Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) % L1ACSQQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Squash (QCF) % SAR 2014 Page 129 of 153

140 Qualification Number of registered learners Change ( ) Count % L1ACTENQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Tennis (QCF) % L1ACTRIQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Triathlon (QCF) % L1ACTTQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Table Tennis (QCF) % L1ACVBQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Volleyball (QCF) % L1ACWLQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Weight Lifting (QCF) N/A L1ACWQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Wrestling (QCF) % L1AIHQ - Level 1 Award in an Introduction to the Horseracing Industry (QCF) N/A L1ASAL - Level 1 NVQ Award in Sport and Active Leisure (QCF) % L1ASTCQ - Level 1 Award In Using Sport to Tackle Youth Crime (QCF) % L1CPEVQ - Level 1 Certificate in Preparation for Event Volunteering (QCF) % L1ENG - Functional Skills Qualification in English at Level % L1MATH - Functional Skills Qualification in Mathematics at Level % L1POCS - Level 1 Award in the Principles of Coaching Sport (QCF) % L2AEAOQ - Level 2 Award in Employment Awareness in the Outdoors (QCF) % L2AFASQ - Level 2 Award in First Aid for Sport (QCF) % L2AIWOQ - Level 2 Award In Introductory Work in the Outdoors (QCF) % L2ALTF - Level 2 Award in Leadership through Football (QCF) % L2ALTRU - Level 2 Award in Leadership through Rugby Union (QCF) % L2AMDSQ - Level 2 Award In Multi-Skills Development in Sport (QCF) % L2ASTCQ - Level 2 Award In Using Sport to Tackle Youth Crime (QCF) % L2AUALLS - Level 2 Award in Understanding the Active Leisure and Learning Sector (QCF) % L2AUSSE - Level 2 Award in Understanding Stewarding at Spectator Events (QCF) % L2CC5Q - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Fives (QCF) % L2CCAQ - Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Angling (QCF) (all disciplines) % L2CCBADQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Badminton (QCF) % L2CCBBQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Basketball (QCF) % L2CCBOWLS - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Bowls (QCF) % L2CCCCRQ - Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Children s Cricket (QCF) % L2CCCQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Cycling (QCF) % SAR 2014 Page 130 of 153

141 Qualification Number of registered learners Change ( ) Count % L2CCCRQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Cricket (QCF) % L2CCCWBQ - Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Cable Wakeboarding (QCF) N/A L2CCFQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Football (QCF) % L2CCGQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (QCF) (all disciplines) % L2CCHBQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Handball (QCF) % L2CCHQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Hockey (QCF) % L2CCJQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Judo (QCF) % L2CCLAXQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Lacrosse (QCF) % L2CCMSQ - Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Motor Sport (QCF) 18 N/A N/A N/A L2CCNBQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Netball (QCF) % L2CCOQ - Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Orienteering (QCF) % L2CCPEMSQ - Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Performance Motor Sport (QCF) % L2CCPKQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Parkour/Freerunning (QCF) % L2CCRLQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Rugby League (QCF) % L2CCRONQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Rounders (QCF) N/A L2CCROWQ - Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Rowing (QCF) (Sliding) % L2CCRUQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Rugby Union (QCF) % L2CCSCQ - Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) % L2CCSQRBQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Squash and Racketball (QCF) N/A L2CCTENQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Tennis (QCF) % L2CCTRIQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Triathlon (QCF) % L2CCTTQ - Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Table Tennis (QCF) % L2CCVBQ - Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Volleyball (QCF) % L2CCWLQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Weight Lifting (QCF) N/A L2CCWQ - Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Wrestling (QCF) % L2CCWS - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Water Skiing/Wakeboarding (QCF) % L2CIWOQ - Level 2 Certificate In Introductory Work in the Outdoors (QCF) % L2CLOQ - Level 2 Certificate In Leisure Operations (QCF) % SAR 2014 Page 131 of 153

142 Qualification Number of registered learners Change ( ) Count % L2CLOQ2 - Level 2 Certificate in Leisure Operations (QCF) % L2CPHQ - Level 2 Certificate In the Principles of Horse Care (QCF) N/A L2CSLPESSQ - Level 2 Certificate in Supporting Learning in Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) % L2DCTENQ - Level 2 Diploma in Coaching Tennis (QCF) % L2EAALL - Level 2 Award in Employment Awareness in Active Leisure and Learning (QCF) % L2ENG - Functional Skills Qualification in English at Level N/A L2MATH - Functional Skills Qualification in Maths at Level N/A L2NCSSQ - Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Spectator Safety (QCF) % L2NVQALQ - Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Activity Leadership (QCF) % L2OPS - Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Active Leisure, Learning and Well-being Operational Services (QCF) % L2POCS - Level 2 Award in the Principles of Coaching Sport (QCF) % L2PPCS - Level 2 Certificate in the Principles and Preparations for Coaching Sport (QCF) % L2TMIQ - Level 2 Award in the Treatment and Management of Injury in Sport (QCF) % L2YPACRQ - Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Young People and Adults Cricket (QCF) % L3AACWEQ - Level 3 Award In Assessing Competence in the Work Environment (QCF) % L3AAVRAQ - Level 3 Award In Assessing Vocationally Related Achievement (QCF) % L3ADLQ/L3ADLQ2 - Level 3 Award In Delivering Learning (QCF) % L3AE&TQ - Level 3 Award in Education and Training (QCF) % L3AEXHB - Level 3 NVQ in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (Handball) % L3AWMQ - Level 3 Award in Workforce Mentoring (QCF) % L3CAVAQ/L3CAVAQA - Level 3 Certificate In Assessing Vocational Achievement (QCF) % L3CAXBBQ - Level 3 Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (Basketball) (QCF) % L3CAXHBQ - Level 3 Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (Handball) (QCF) % L3CAXQ - Level 3 Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (QCF) % L3CAXROWQ - Level 3 Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (Rowing) (QCF) % L3CCBADQ - Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Badminton (QCF) % L3CCBBQ - Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Basketball (QCF) N/A L3CCCRQ - Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Cricket (QCF) % SAR 2014 Page 132 of 153

143 Qualification Number of registered learners Change ( ) Count % L3CCGQ - Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (QCF) (all disciplines) N/A L3CCHQ - Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Hockey (QCF) % L3CCJQ - Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Judo (QCF) % L3CCMTBQ - Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Mountain Biking (QCF) % L3CCNBQ - Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Netball (QCF) % L3CCRLQ - Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Rugby League (QCF) % L3CCROWQ - Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Rowing (QCF) N/A L3CCRTTQ - Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Road and Time Trial Cycling (QCF) % L3CCRUQ - Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Rugby Union (QCF) % L3CCSCQ - Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) % L3CCSQQ - Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Squash (QCF) % L3CCTCQ - Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Track Cycling (QCF) % L3CCTENQ - Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Tennis (QCF) % L3CCTRIQ - Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Triathlon (QCF) % L3CCTTQ - Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Table Tennis (QCF) % L3CCWBQ - Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Wakeboarding (QCF) % L3CCWSQ - Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Water Skiing (QCF) % L3CEAOQ - Level 3 Certificate in Employment Awareness in the Outdoors (QCF) % L3CLMQ - Level 3 Certificate In Leisure Management (QCF) % L3CMSVQ - Level 3 Certificate In Managing Sports Volunteers (QCF) % L3CPESS - Level 3 Certificate in Supporting the Delivery of Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) % L3CTALSQ - Level 3 Certificate in Talented Athlete Lifestyle Support (QCF) % L3CUSPBBQ - Level 3 Certificate in Understanding Sports Performance (Basketball) (QCF) % L3CUSPHBQ - Level 3 Certificate in Understanding Sports Performance (Handball) (QCF) % L3CUSPQ - Level 3 Certificate in Understanding Sports Performance (QCF) % L3CUSPROWQ - Level 3 Certificate in Understanding Sports Performance (Rowing) (QCF) % L3DAXBBQ - Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (Basketball) (QCF) % L3DAXQ - Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (QCF) N/A L3DCTENQ14 - Level 3 Diploma in Coaching Tennis (QCF) N/A SAR 2014 Page 133 of 153

144 Qualification Number of registered learners Change ( ) Count % L3DLMQ - Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Leisure Management (QCF) % L3DOP - Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Outdoor Programmes (QCF) (all pathways) % L3DSD - Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Sports Development (QCF) % L3DWRCSQ - Level 3 Diploma in Work Based Racehorse Care and Management (QCF) Specialist Racehorse Care N/A L3EAALL - Level 3 Award in Employment Awareness in Active Leisure and Learning (QCF) % L3NCSS - Level 3 NVQ Certificate in Spectator Safety (QCF) % L3NVQPESS - Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Supporting the Delivery of Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) N/A L3POCS - Level 3 Award in the Principles of Coaching Sport (QCF) % L3TMIQ - Level 3 Certificate in the Treatment and Management of Injury in Sport (QCF) % L4AIQAQ - Level 4 Award In the Internal Quality Assurance of Assessment Processes and Practice (QCF) % L4NDSS - Level 4 NVQ Diploma in Spectator Safety Management (QCF) % SVQ3LM - SVQ 3 in Leisure Management at SCQF Level % Total % Table A11.1 1st4sport trends in learner registrations per qualification ( ) SAR 2014 Page 134 of 153

145 1st4sport trends in learner certifications per qualification ( ) Qualification Number of certificated learners Change ( ) Count % L1AC5Q - Level 1 Award in Coaching Fives (QCF) % L1ACAQ - Level 1 Award In Coaching Angling (QCF) % L1ACARCQ - Level 1 Award In Coaching Archery (QCF) % L1ACBADQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Badminton (QCF) % L1ACBBQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Basketball (QCF) % L1ACBOCQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Boccia (QCF) N/A L1ACBOWLSQ - Level 1 Award In Coaching Bowls (QCF) N/A L1ACCQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Cycling (QCF) % L1ACCRQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Cricket (QCF) % L1ACCRQO - Level 1 Award in Coaching Cricket % L1ACFQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Football (QCF) % L1ACGQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Gymnastics (QCF) (all disciplines) % L1ACHQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Hockey (QCF) % L1ACJQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Judo (QCF) % L1ACLAXQ - Level 1 Award In Coaching Lacrosse (QCF) % L1ACNBQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Netball (QCF) % L1ACOQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Orienteering (QCF) % L1ACPKQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Parkour/ Freerunning (QCF) % L1ACRLQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Rugby League (QCF) % L1ACRONQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Rounders (QCF) % L1ACRUQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Rugby Union (QCF) % L1ACSCQ - Level 1 Award In Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) % L1ACSQQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Squash (QCF) % L1ACTENQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Tennis (QCF) % L1ACTRIQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Triathlon (QCF) % L1ACTTQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Table Tennis (QCF) % L1ACVBQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Volleyball (QCF) % L1ACWLQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Weight Lifting (QCF) N/A SAR 2014 Page 135 of 153

146 Qualification Number of certificated learners Change ( ) Count % L1ACWQ - Level 1 Award in Coaching Wrestling (QCF) % L1ASAL - Level 1 NVQ Award in Sport and Active Leisure (QCF) % L1ASTCQ - Level 1 Award In Using Sport to Tackle Youth Crime (QCF) % L1CPEVQ - Level 1 Certificate in Preparation for Event Volunteering (QCF) % L1ENG - Functional Skills Qualification in English at Level % L1MATH - Functional Skills Qualification in Mathematics at Level % L1POCS - Level 1 Award in the Principles of Coaching Sport (QCF) % L2AEAOQ - Level 2 Award in Employment Awareness in the Outdoors (QCF) % L2AFASQ - Level 2 Award in First Aid for Sport (QCF) % L2AIWOQ - Level 2 Award In Introductory Work in the Outdoors (QCF) % L2ALTF - Level 2 Award in Leadership through Football (QCF) % L2ALTRU - Level 2 Award in Leadership through Rugby Union (QCF) % L2AMDSQ - Level 2 Award In Multi-Skills Development in Sport (QCF) % L2ASTCQ - Level 2 Award In Using Sport to Tackle Youth Crime (QCF) % L2AUALLS - Level 2 Award in Understanding the Active Leisure and Learning Sector (QCF) % L2AUSSE - Level 2 Award in Understanding Stewarding at Spectator Events (QCF) % L2CC5Q - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Fives (QCF) % L2CCAQ - Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Angling (QCF) (all disciplines) % L2CCBADQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Badminton (QCF) % L2CCBBQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Basketball (QCF) % L2CCBOWLS - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Bowls (QCF) % L2CCCCRQ - Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Children s Cricket (QCF) N/A L2CCCQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Cycling (QCF) % L2CCCRQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Cricket (QCF) % L2CCCRQO - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Cricket % L2CCFQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Football (QCF) % L2CCGQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (QCF) (all disciplines) % L2CCHBQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Handball (QCF) % L2CCHQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Hockey (QCF) % L2CCJQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Judo (QCF) % SAR 2014 Page 136 of 153

147 Qualification Number of certificated learners Change ( ) Count % L2CCLAXQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Lacrosse (QCF) % L2CCMSQ - Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Motor Sport (QCF) % L2CCNBQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Netball (QCF) % L2CCOQ - Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Orienteering (QCF) % L2CCPEMSQ - Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Performance Motor Sport (QCF) N/A L2CCPKQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Parkour/Freerunning (QCF) % L2CCRLQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Rugby League (QCF) % L2CCRONQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Rounders (QCF) N/A L2CCROWQ - Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Rowing (QCF) % L2CCRUQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Rugby Union (QCF) % L2CCSCQ - Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) % L2CCSQQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Squash (QCF) % L2CCSQRBQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Squash and Racketball (QCF) N/A L2CCTENQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Tennis (QCF) % L2CCTRIQ - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Triathlon (QCF) % L2CCTTQ - Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Table Tennis (QCF) % L2CCVBQ - Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Volleyball (QCF) % L2CCWQ - Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Wrestling (QCF) % L2CCWS - Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Water Skiing/Wakeboarding (QCF) % L2CIWOQ - Level 2 Certificate In Introductory Work in the Outdoors (QCF) % L2CLOQ/L2CLOQ2 - Level 2 Certificate In Leisure Operations (QCF) % L2CSLPESSQ - Level 2 Certificate in Supporting Learning in Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) % L2DCTENQ - Level 2 Diploma in Coaching Tennis (QCF) % L2DLTS - Level 2 Diploma In Coaching Learn to Swim (QCF) % L2DLTS2 - Level 2 Diploma In Coaching Learn to Swim (QCF) N/A L2EAALL - Level 2 Award in Employment Awareness in Active Leisure and Learning (QCF) % L2NCSSQ - Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Spectator Safety (QCF) % L2NVQALQ - Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Activity Leadership (QCF) % L2OPS - Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Active Leisure, Learning and Well-being Operational Services (QCF) % SAR 2014 Page 137 of 153

148 Qualification Number of certificated learners Change ( ) Count % L2POCS - Level 2 Award in the Principles of Coaching Sport (QCF) % L2PPCS - Level 2 Certificate in the Principles and Preparations for Coaching Sport (QCF) % L2TMIQ - Level 2 Award in the Treatment and Management of Injury in Sport (QCF) % L2YPACRQ - Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Young People and Adults Cricket (QCF) N/A L3AACWEQ - Level 3 Award In Assessing Competence in the Work Environment (QCF) % L3AAVRAQ - Level 3 Award In Assessing Vocationally Related Achievement (QCF) % L3ADLQ/L3ADLQ2 - Level 3 Award In Delivering Learning (QCF) % L3AE&TQ - Level 3 Award in Education and Training (QCF) N/A L3AEXHB - Level 3 NVQ in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (Handball) % L3AEXROW - Level 3 NVQ in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (Rowing) % L3APTLLSQ - Level 3 Award In Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector (QCF) % L3AWMQ - Level 3 Award in Workforce Mentoring (QCF) % L3CAVAQ/L3CAVAQA - Level 3 Certificate In Assessing Vocational Achievement (QCF) % L3CAXBBQ - Level 3 Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (Basketball) (QCF) % L3CAXHBQ - Level 3 Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (Handball) (QCF) % L3CAXQ - Level 3 Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (QCF) % L3CAXROWQ - Level 3 Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (Rowing) (QCF) % L3CCBADQ - Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Badminton (QCF) % L3CCBBQ - Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Basketball (QCF) N/A L3CCCRQ - Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Cricket (QCF) % L3CCF06 - Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Football % L3CCGQ - Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (QCF) (all disciplines) N/A L3CCHQ - Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Hockey (QCF) % L3CCJQ - Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Judo (QCF) % L3CCMTBQ - Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Mountain Biking (QCF) % L3CCNBQ - Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Netball (QCF) % L3CCRLQ - Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Rugby League (QCF) % L3CCRTTQ - Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Road and Time Trial Cycling (QCF) % L3CCRUQ - Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Rugby Union (QCF) % L3CCSCQ - Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) % SAR 2014 Page 138 of 153

149 Qualification Number of certificated learners Change ( ) Count % L3CCSQQ - Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Squash (QCF) % L3CCTCQ - Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Track Cycling (QCF) % L3CCTENQ - Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Tennis (QCF) % L3CCTRIQ - Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Triathlon (QCF) % L3CCTTQ - Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Table Tennis (QCF) N/A L3CEAOQ - Level 3 Certificate in Employment Awareness in the Outdoors (QCF) % L3CLMQ - Level 3 Certificate In Leisure Management (QCF) % L3CMSVQ - Level 3 Certificate In Managing Sports Volunteers (QCF) % L3CPESS - Level 3 Certificate in Supporting the Delivery of Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) N/A L3CTALSQ - Level 3 Certificate in Talented Athlete Lifestyle Support (QCF) % L3CUSPBBQ - Level 3 Certificate in Understanding Sports Performance (Basketball) (QCF) % L3CUSPHBQ - Level 3 Certificate in Understanding Sports Performance (Handball) (QCF) % L3CUSPQ - Level 3 Certificate in Understanding Sports Performance (QCF) % L3CUSPROWQ - Level 3 Certificate in Understanding Sports Performance (Rowing) (QCF) % L3DAXBBQ - Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (Basketball) (QCF) % L3DAXQ - Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (QCF) N/A L3DAXROWQ - Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (Rowing) (QCF) % L3DLMQ - Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Leisure Management (QCF) % L3DOP - Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Outdoor Programmes (QCF) (all pathways) % L3DSD - Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Sports Development (QCF) % L3EAALL - Level 3 Award in Employment Awareness in Active Leisure and Learning (QCF) % L3IAPS - Level 3 Certificate in Introduction to Assessment Practice in Sport % L3NCSS - Level 3 NVQ Certificate in Spectator Safety (QCF) % L3NVQPESS - Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Supporting the Delivery of Physical Education & School Sport (QCF) N/A L3POCS - Level 3 Award in the Principles of Coaching Sport (QCF) % L3TMIQ - Level 3 Certificate in the Treatment and Management of Injury in Sport (QCF) % L4AIQAQ - Level 4 Award In the Internal Quality Assurance of Assessment Processes and Practice (QCF) % SVQ3LM - SVQ 3 in Leisure Management at SCQF Level N/A Total % Table A11.2 1st4sport trends in learner certifications per qualification ( ) SAR 2014 Page 139 of 153

150 Results from the enquiries analysis show an indication of how people hear about 1stsport, our qualifications and the effectiveness of our marketing tools to increase our brand awareness in the industry. Responses of enquirers as to how they heard about 1st4sport (2014) External Verifier County Sports 3% Partnership 4% Other 7% Governing body of sport 14% Colleague 19% 1st4sport Qualifications Mailing/Flyer 2% Search engine (e.g. Google) 2% 1st4sport Qualifications 1% Website 28% Word of mouth 20% Chart A11.1 Analysis of effectiveness of marketing tools contributing towards 1st4sport s brand awareness. Website Word of mouth Colleague Governing body of sport Other County Sports Partnership External Verifier 1st4sport Qualifications Mailing/Flyer Search engine (e.g. Google) 1st4sport Qualifications Responses of enquirers as to how they heard about about specific 1st4sport qualifications (2014) Governing body of sport 8% 1st4sport Qualifications 6% Other 6% External Verifier 10% Colleague 10% 1st4sport Qualifications Mailing/Flyer 5% Word of mouth 12% County Sports Partnership 1% Search engine (e.g. Google) 1% Conference 0.1% Website 41% Chart A11.2 Analysis of effectiveness of tools for the marketing of 1st4sport qualifications. Website Word of mouth Colleague External Verifier Governing body of sport Other 1st4sport Qualifications 1st4sport Qualifications Mailing/Flyer County Sports Partnership Search engine (e.g. Google) Conference SAR 2014 Page 140 of 153

151 Following with the qualification demand statistics, an analysis of the qualifications that organisations applied for as part of centre recognition and existing recognised centres that applied as part of the qualification approval is provided in tables A11.4 and A11.5 respectively. An overview of the volume of applications received and outcomes is provided in table A11.3. Overview of centre recognition and qualification approval applications received and related outcomes (2014) Centre Recognition Applications Number Qualification Approval Applications Number Successful applications 74 Successful applications 314 Pending applications 43 Pending applications 67 Declined applications 2 Declined applications 5 Total applications received 119 Total applications received 386 Total recognised* 92 Total approved* 469 Table A11.3 Overview of centre recognition and qualification approval applications received and related outcomes (2014) *This includes the new recognised centres and qualification approval statuses granted to the old BHEST centres as a result of the transfer to 1st4sport, following the launch of the new suite of horseracing and farriery qualifications. The rationale for declined applications was the centre s/new organisation s decision not to progress with their application and in some cases their inability to meet workforce criteria. The centre recognition applications were related to 37 qualifications and the qualification approval applications were related to 67 qualifications. However, these figures do not include the centre recognition and qualification approval status granted to the old BHEST centres as a result of the transfer to 1st4sport, as no applications were submitted. Number of approval applications received per qualification as part of centre recognition applications (2014) Qualification Number Level 1 Award in Coaching Football (QCF) 19 Level 1 Award in the Principles for Coaching Sport (QCF) 9 Level 1 Award in Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) 8 Level 2 Certificate in Supporting Learning in Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) 7 Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Activity Leadership (QCF) 7 Level 3 Certificate in Supporting the Delivery of Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) 7 Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Supporting the Delivery of Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) 7 Level 2 Award in the Principles for Coaching Sport (QCF) 6 Level 2 Award in Leadership through Football (QCF) 5 SAR 2014 Page 141 of 153

152 Qualification Number Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) 5 Level 3 NVQ Certificate in Spectator Safety (QCF) 4 Level 2 Certificate in the Principles and Preparations for Coaching Sport (QCF) 3 Level 3 Award in Education and Training (QCF) 3 Level 1 Award in Coaching Weight Lifting (QCF) 2 Level 2 Award in First Aid for Sport (QCF) 2 Level 2 Award in Multi-Skills Development in Sport (QCF) 2 Level 2 Award in Understanding Stewarding at Spectator Events (QCF) 2 Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Spectator Safety (QCF) 2 Level 1 Award in Coaching Badminton (QCF) 1 Level 1 Award in Coaching Rugby League (QCF) 1 Level 1 Award in Coaching Tennis (QCF) 1 Level 1 Award in Coaching Volleyball (QCF) 1 Level 1 Certificate in Preparation for Event Volunteering (QCF) 1 Level 1 NVQ Award in Sports and Active Leisure (QCF) 1 Level 2 Award in the Treatment and Management of Injury in Sport (QCF) 1 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Basketball (QCF) 1 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Football (QCF) 1 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Motor Sport (QCF) 1 Level 2 Certificate in Leisure Operations (QCF) (2013) 1 Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Active Leisure, Learning and Well-being Operational Services (QCF) 1 Level 3 Certificate in Assessing Vocational Achievement (QCF) 1 Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Cricket (QCF) 1 Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Rugby Union (QCF) 1 Level 3 Certificate in Understanding Sports Performance (QCF) 1 Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Outdoor Programmes (QCF) (via the Outdoor Recreation Pathway) 1 Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Sports Development (QCF) 1 Level 4 NVQ Diploma in Spectator Safety Management (QCF) 1 Total 119 Table A11.4 Applications for qualification approval submitted by organisations that wish to obtain centre recognition SAR 2014 Page 142 of 153

153 Number of approval applications received per qualification (2014) Qualification Number Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Supporting the Delivery of Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) 40 Level 3 Certificate in Supporting the Delivery of Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) 33 Level 2 Certificate in Supporting Learning in Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) 28 Level 2 Award in the Principles for Coaching Sport (QCF) 20 Level 2 Award in Employment Awareness in Active Leisure and Learning (QCF) 16 Level 3 Award in Employment Awareness in Active Leisure and Learning (QCF) 14 Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Sports Development (QCF) 14 Level 2 Award in Multi-Skills Development in Sport (QCF) 13 Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Activity Leadership (QCF) 13 Level 2 Certificate in the Principles and Preparations for Coaching Sport (QCF) 12 Level 3 Certificate in Managing Sports Volunteers (QCF) 12 Level 1 Award in Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) 11 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) 10 Level 3 Award in the Principles for Coaching Sport (QCF) 10 Level 1 Award in Coaching Football (QCF) 8 Level 3 Award in Education and Training (QCF) 8 Level 1 Award in the Principles for Coaching Sport (QCF) 7 Level 2 Award in Leadership through Football (QCF) 7 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Football (QCF) 7 Level 2 Certificate in Leisure Operations (QCF) (2013) 7 Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Active Leisure, Learning and Well-being Operational Services (QCF) 5 Level 3 Award in Delivering Learning (QCF) Functional Skills Qualification in English at Level 1 4 Functional Skills Qualification in Mathematics at Level 1 4 Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) 4 Functional Skills Qualification in English at Level 2 3 Level 2 Award in Introductory Work in the Outdoors (QCF) 3 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Basketball (QCF) 3 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Tennis (QCF) 3 Level 3 Award in Workforce Mentoring (QCF) 3 Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Tennis (QCF) 3 Level 3 Certificate in Leisure Management (QCF) 3 Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Leisure Management (QCF) 3 Level 4 Award In the Internal Quality Assurance of Assessment Processes and Practice (QCF) 3 SAR 2014 Page 143 of 153

154 Qualification Number Functional Skills Qualification in Maths at Level 2 2 Level 1 Award in Coaching Badminton (QCF) 2 Level 1 Award in Coaching Basketball (QCF) 2 Level 1 Award in Coaching Weight Lifting (QCF) 2 Level 1 Award in Fire Safety Awareness (QCF) 2 Level 1 Certificate in Preparation for Event Volunteering (QCF) 2 Level 1 NVQ Award in Sports and Active Leisure (QCF) 2 Level 2 Award in Emergency First Aid at Work (QCF) 2 Level 2 Award in First Aid for Sport (QCF) 2 Level 2 Award in Understanding Stewarding at Spectator Events (QCF) 2 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Volleyball (QCF) 2 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Weight Lifting (QCF) 2 Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Spectator Safety (QCF) 2 Level 3 Award in Assessing Competence in the Work Environment (QCF) 2 Level 1 Award in Coaching Rugby League (QCF) 1 Level 1 Award in Using Sport to Tackle Youth Crime (QCF) 1 Level 2 Award in Employment Awareness in the Outdoors (QCF) 1 Level 2 Award in Refereeing Rugby League 1 Level 2 Award in Using Sport to Tackle Youth Crime (QCF) 1 Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Angling (QCF) (Coarse) 1 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Cable Wakeboarding 1 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Handball (QCF) 1 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Netball (QCF) 1 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Rugby League (QCF) 1 Level 2 Certificate in Introductory Work in the Outdoors (QCF) 1 Level 3 Award in Assessing Vocationally Related Achievement (QCF) 1 Level 3 Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (QCF) 1 Level 3 Certificate in Assessing Vocational Achievement (QCF) 1 Level 3 Certificate in Understanding Sports Performance (QCF) 1 Level 3 NVQ Certificate in Spectator Safety (QCF) 1 Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (QCF) 1 Level 3 NVQ in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance 1 Level 4 NVQ Diploma in Spectator Safety Management (QCF) 1 Total 386 Table A11.5 Applications submitted by 1st4sport recognised centres for qualification approval SAR 2014 Page 144 of 153

155 The following analysis represents the spread and type of incidents across qualifications. In total, 76 incidents were identified and successfully managed, in relation to 107 qualifications. 1st4sport trends in learner certifications per qualification ( ) Qualification Count Percentage Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Football (QCF) 22 20% Level 1 Award in Coaching Football (QCF) 9 8% Level 2 Award in Employment Awareness in Active Leisure and Learning (QCF) 6 5% Level 1 Award in Coaching Netball (QCF) 5 4% Level 1 Award in Coaching Basketball (QCF) 4 3% Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Sports Development (QCF) 4 3% Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Basketball (QCF) 3 3% Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Lacrosse (QCF) 3 3% Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) 3 3% Level 2 Certificate in Supporting Learning in Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) 3 3% Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Spectator Safety (QCF) 3 3% Level 1 Award in Coaching Archery (QCF) 2 2% Level 1 Award in Coaching Lacrosse (QCF) 2 2% Level 1 Award in Coaching Volleyball (QCF) 2 2% Level 1 Award in the Principles for Coaching Sport (QCF) 2 2% Level 2 Certificate in the Principles and Preparations for Coaching Sport (QCF) 2 2% Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Activity Leadership (QCF) 2 2% Level 3 Award in Employment Awareness in Active Leisure and Learning (QCF) 2 2% Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Football 2 2% Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Tennis (QCF) 2 2% Functional Skills Qualification in English at Level 1 1 1% Level 1 Award in Coaching Badminton (QCF) 1 1% Level 1 Award in Coaching Rugby League (QCF) 1 1% Level 1 Award in Coaching Rugby Union (QCF) 1 1% Level 1 Award in Using Sport to Tackle Youth Crime (QCF) 1 1% Level 2 Award in Leadership through Football (QCF) 1 1% Level 2 Award in the Principles for Coaching Sport (QCF) 1 1% Level 2 Award in the Treatment and Management of Injury in Sport (QCF) 1 1% Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Badminton (QCF) 1 1% Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Children s Cricket (QCF) 1 1% SAR 2014 Page 145 of 153

156 Qualification Count Percentage Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (QCF) 1 1% Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Netball (QCF) 1 1% Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Rugby League (QCF) 1 1% Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Rugby Union (QCF) 1 1% Level 3 Award in Assessing Competence in the Work Environment (QCF) 1 1% Level 3 Award in Assessing Vocationally Related Achievement (QCF) 1 1% Level 3 Award in Delivering Learning (QCF) % Level 3 Award in Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector (QCF) 1 1% Level 3 Certificate in Assessing Vocational Achievement (QCF) 1 1% Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Hockey (QCF) 1 1% Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Strength and Conditioning (QCF) 1 1% Level 3 Certificate in Managing Sports Volunteers (QCF) 1 1% Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Outdoor Programmes (QCF) 1 1% Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Supporting the Delivery of Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) 1 1% Total % Table A11.6 Analysis of incidents per qualification An analysis on the type of incidents types that were successfully managed in 2014 is shown in chart A11.3. The nature of the majority of incidents which fall into the other category (10%) was primarily related to recognised centre ceasing to trade and their inability to pay outstanding debt to 1st4sport. Types of incidents (2014) Learner complaints against their centre 8% Other 10% Reports of suspected non by a centre 24% Learner appeals against their centre 4% Reports of suspected learner misconduct 3% Reports of suspected non by 1st4sport 1% EV reported sanctions against a centre 50% EV reported sanctions against a centre Reports of suspected non- by a centre Other Learner complaints against their centre Learner appeals against their centre Reports of suspected learner misconduct Reports of suspected non- by 1st4sport Chart A11.3 Analysis of incident types SAR 2014 Page 146 of 153

157 Actions and Recognised Centre Risk Profile The table below show an analysis of the actions imposed on centres related to the delivery of specific qualifications. This is as a result of the identification of areas of non- through the different types of our monitoring activity in line with our risk management process. Number of actions across qualifications (2014) Qualification Level 1 Award in Coaching Football (QCF) 105 Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Activity Leadership (QCF) 75 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Football (QCF) 65 Level 2 Award in Employment Awareness in Active Leisure and Learning (QCF) 44 Level 1 Award in the Principles for Coaching Sport (QCF) 42 Level 2 Award in the Principles for Coaching Sport (QCF) 40 Level 2 Certificate in Supporting Learning in Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) 36 Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Sports Development (QCF) 34 Level 2 Award in Multi-Skills Development in Sport (QCF) 24 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) 24 Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Supporting the Delivery of Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) 18 Level 3 Certificate in Supporting the Delivery of Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) 17 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Young People and Adults Cricket (QCF) 16 Level 2 Award in Leadership through Football (QCF) 13 Functional Skills Qualification in English at Level 1 10 Level 1 Award in Coaching Volleyball (QCF) 10 Level 2 Certificate in Leisure Operations (QCF) (2013) 10 Level 2 Certificate in the Principles and Preparations for Coaching Sport (QCF) 10 Level 3 Award in Delivering Learning (QCF) Level 3 Award in Employment Awareness in Active Leisure and Learning (QCF) 10 Level 3 Certificate in Assessing Vocational Achievement (QCF) 10 Level 1 Award in Coaching Archery (QCF) 9 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Children's Cricket (QCF) 9 Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Active Leisure, Learning and Well-being Operational Services (QCF) 9 Level 1 Award in Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) 8 Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Spectator Safety (QCF) 8 Count SAR 2014 Page 147 of 153

158 Qualification Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Outdoor Programmes (QCF) 8 Level 1 Award in Coaching Rugby Union (QCF) 7 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Cricket (QCF) 7 Level 3 Award in the Principles for Coaching Sport (QCF) 7 SVQ 3 in Leisure Management at SCQF Level 7 7 Level 1 Award in Coaching Angling (QCF) 6 Level 1 Award in Coaching Badminton (QCF) 6 Level 1 Award in Coaching Tennis (QCF) 6 Level 2 Award in Leadership through Rugby Union (QCF) 6 Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Rugby Union (QCF) 6 Level 1 Award in Coaching Gymnastics (QCF) 5 Level 1 Award in Coaching Lacrosse (QCF) 5 Level 2 Award in Understanding Stewarding at Spectator Events (QCF) 5 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Lacrosse (QCF) 5 Level 3 Award in Education and Training (QCF) 5 Level 3 Certificate in Managing Sports Volunteers (QCF) 5 Level 4 Award In the Internal Quality Assurance of Assessment Processes and Practice (QCF) 5 Level 1 NVQ Award in Sports and Active Leisure (QCF) 4 Level 2 Award in First Aid for Sport (QCF) 4 Level 2 Award in the Treatment and Management of Injury in Sport (QCF) 4 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Basketball (QCF) 4 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (QCF) 4 Level 3 Award in Assessing Vocationally Related Achievement (QCF) 4 Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Leisure Management (QCF) 4 Level 1 Award in Coaching Bowls (QCF) 3 Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Angling (QCF) 3 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Badminton (QCF) 3 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Volleyball (QCF) 3 Level 3 Award in Assessing Competence in the Work Environment (QCF) 3 Level 3 Certificate in Understanding Sports Performance (QCF) 3 Level 1 Award in Coaching Basketball (QCF) 2 Count SAR 2014 Page 148 of 153

159 Qualification Level 1 Award in Coaching Hockey (QCF) 2 Level 1 Award in Coaching Netball (QCF) 2 Level 1 Award in Coaching Triathlon (QCF) 2 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Cycling (QCF) 2 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Handball (QCF) 2 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Rowing (QCF) 2 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Rugby Union (QCF) 2 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Squash and Racketball (QCF) 2 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Tennis (QCF) 2 Level 3 Award in Workforce Mentoring (QCF) 2 Functional Skills Qualification in Mathematics at Level 1 1 Level 2 Award in Emergency First Aid at Work (QCF) 1 Level 2 Award in Introductory Work in the Outdoors (QCF) 1 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Hockey (QCF) 1 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Netball (QCF) 1 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Parkour/ Freerunning (QCF) 1 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Rugby League (QCF) 1 Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Table Tennis (QCF) 1 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Wrestling (QCF) 1 Level 3 Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (Basketball) (QCF) 1 Level 3 Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (QCF) 1 Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Basketball (QCF) 1 Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Cricket (QCF) 1 Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Cycling 1 Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Hockey (QCF) 1 Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) 1 Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Wakeboarding (QCF) 1 Level 3 Certificate in Leisure Management (QCF) 1 Level 3 NVQ Certificate in Spectator Safety (QCF) 1 Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (QCF) 1 Total 855 Table A11.7 Number of actions imposed on centres per qualification Count SAR 2014 Page 149 of 153

160 The total number of actions imposed on centres in 2014 is 895 (683 actions in 2013, 479 actions in 2012 and 331 actions in 2011) related to 87 qualifications. The reason for the increase is partly due to a process change to enable a more robust monitoring and proactive approach to prevent any serious non- and/or potential adverse effects. Minor discrepancies in the data, possible duplication of actions created in Athena and timescales of data collection may have had a slight impact on the validity of the data related to actions. Actions imposed on centres based upon the type of monitoring (2014) Recognition and approval application 2% Visit to verify DCS after sanctions 2% Visit to provide training/advice 1% Visit to verify a cohort of learners 1% Desk review of DCS after sanctions 1% Desk review of a cohort of learners 2% Desk review of 1st course 5% Incident management 1% Desk review/visit of centre systems 1% Desk review of a course 5% Qualification approval application 8% Visit to verify a course 36% Recognition and approval visit 8% Visit to verify 1st course (formative pre DCS) 8% Visit to verify 1st course (summative DCS review) 19% Chart A11.4 Analysis of actions imposed on centres in line with our risk management process on centre activity SAR 2014 Page 150 of 153

161 Level of actions imposed on centres (2014) Level 2: Medium risk 20% Level 3: High risk 4% Level 4: Very high risk 1% Level 1: Low risk Level 2: Medium risk Level 1: Low risk 75% Level 3: High risk Level 4: Very high risk Chart A11.5 Analysis of level of actions imposed on centres Implementation status of actions imposed on centres (2014) Incomplete actions 37% Complete actions Complete actions 63% Incomplete actions Chart A11.6 Analysis of action s implementation status by centres Despite the increase in the number of actions imposed on centres over the past years timescales in the implementation of these actions by centres has shown an improvement (incomplete actions in 2011 was 82%, 71% in 2012, and 35% in 2013). This is primarily due to improved process efficiency, the systematic monitoring by EVs and Coordinating EVs, as well as centres effort to report the completion of an action via the creation of the Action Response Form on Athena. SAR 2014 Page 151 of 153

162 Percentage Reasonable adjustment requests across qualifications (2014) 20% 18% 16% 14% 12% 10% 8% 6% 4% 2% 0% 18% 15% 13% 8% 8% 7% 3% 3% 3% 2% 2% 2% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% Chart A11.7 Analysis of requests for reasonable adjustments across qualifications The reasonable adjustment requests were related to 28 qualifications. Of the 95 requests evaluated in 2014 only 9 have been declined; this was mainly due to learners inability and/or lack of evidence to meet the eligibility criteria, and also due to learners decision to withdraw from the course. Reasonable adjustments granted based on learner's needs (2014) Behavioural, emotional and social 5% Communication and interaction 1% Sensory and physical Cognition and learning Cognition and learning 39% Sensory and physical 55% Behavioural, emotional and social Communication and interaction Chart A11.8 Analysis of requests for reasonable adjustments granted based on learner s needs SAR 2014 Page 152 of 153

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