1st4sport Qualifications Self-assessment Report 2015

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1 1st4sport Qualifications Self-assessment Report 2015

2 Coachwise Ltd, 2016 This document is copyright under the Berne Convention. All rights are reserved. Apart from any fair dealing for the purposes of private study, research, criticism or review, as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1998, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, electrical, chemical, mechanical, optical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the copyright owner. Enquiries should be addressed to 1st4sport Qualifications. 1st4sport Qualifications Coachwise Ltd Chelsea Close Off Amberley Road Armley Leeds LS12 4HP Fax: Website: The Ofqual/Qualifications Wales/SQA-recognised awarding organisation 1st4sport Qualifications is a brand of Coachwise Ltd, the trading arm of The National Coaching Foundation (known as sports coach UK), the UK-registered charity leading the national development of coaches and the coaching system. Any proceeds go directly back to sports coach UK to help them develop and advance sport nationwide.

3 Contents Page I Executive Summary I 1 Introduction Overview Self-assessment The Self-assessment Process The Self-assessment Report 3 2 Methodology Performance Management The EFQM Excellence Model The Fundamental Concepts of Excellence The EFQM Model The RADAR Logic Self-assessment validation approaches The self-analysis matrix as the selected validation approach The workshop as the selected validation approach Type of Analysis Treatment of data, evidence and identification of trends 17 SAR 2014 I

4 Contents Page 3 Results Analysis and representation of the EFQM scoring results Weighting of EFQM criteria EFQM self-analysis matrix responses and score Synopsis of EFQM Results Limitations of the self-assessment process and future recommendations (reflective ) Conclusion 31 Appendix 1 Education industry research and key trends (Ofqual Report and SQA Accreditation Annual Review) 32 AI Ofqual Statistical Release - Annual Qualifications Market Report England, Wales and Northern Ireland 32 BI SQA Accreditation Annual Review 52 Appendix 2 1st4sport performance statistics 59 Appendix 3 Strategic direction achievement rates 66 Appendix 4 Self evaluation - Statutory outcomes 70 Appendix 5 Stakeholder satisfaction levels 87 Appendix 6 Learner satisfaction levels 106 Appendix 7 1st4sport employee satisfaction levels 108 Appendix 8 External quality assurers satisfaction levels on training provision 113 Appendix 9 Qualification specific performance statistics 114 SAR 2014 II

5 I Self-assessment Report - Executive Summary Rationale 1st4sport Qualifications is an awarding organisation recognised and regulated in England by the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation (Ofqual), who also regulate vocational qualifications in Northern Ireland. 1st4sport are further regulated in Wales by Qualifications Wales and in Scotland by the Scottish Qualifications Authority Accreditation (SQA). We specialise in offering vocational and occupational qualifications to service the sport, physical activity and active leisure industry. We work in partnership with a variety of organisations including Governing Bodies of Sport (GBS) and other organisations in the development of our qualifications. To ensure the continuous development and maintenance of our awarding function within a culture of excellence, we have established The 1st4sport Leadership and Management Approach. This approach is based upon the systematic deployment of the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) Excellence Model (2012), which involves implementation of the EFQM criteria set as our quality standards. To facilitate effective implementation of the approach, the quality standards are integrated within our strategic planning and common process framework, providing our organisation with a sustainable advantage in sectors in which we operate. This is achieved through effective performance management, which enables us to ensure our and organisational performance levels are monitored, managed and improved across all operations. Self-assessment, as the integral component of performance management is the effective technique, which contributes to systematic continuous improvement and indicates the current level of our performance. The self-assessment process and methodology Our quality standards are established in line with the revised EFQM model (figure I). To ensure consistent, valid and relevant performance results, which relate directly to the implementation of the quality standards, the EFQM model is also used to undertake self-assessment, ensuring it fits our corporate culture, needs and encourages organisational learning. The conduct of the self-assessment is based on: The Fundamental Concepts of Excellence The EFQM Excellence Model RADAR logic. Our performance is evaluated and outcomes validated via the RADAR assessment and management tool, and the self-analysis matrix. This combination of approaches enables the triangulation and accuracy of outcomes. A number of quantitative and qualitative data collection tools are used to facilitate valid and reliable performance outcomes. Outcomes are published in the self-assessment report annually on completion of the self-assessment process and made available to all stakeholders. The structure of the self-assessment report is based on the EFQM model, which facilitates an integrated approach to striving for organisational excellence. Strengths, areas for improvements and the resultant improvement plan, in line with the EFQM model, conclude the report. SAR Executive Summary I

6 Information systems enhancements result in large amounts of data being generated every year, which contributes to the evaluation of our performance. Over the last few years a significant investment has been made in developing an effective technology portfolio in support of our awarding operation which enables effective auditing and the production of valid statistical data. The increased validity of results has enabled more accurate conclusions to be drawn. However, in some cases data is considered to represent individuals perceptions that may vary and deviate from the pragmatic state. At other times data provides only an indication of an outcome rather than an indisputable fact. In light of the above, we have been careful in making conclusions and identifying trends, ensuring that such have only been reached after careful consideration of all the factors which impact, to avoid misinterpretations and misuse of the data. Figure I. The EFQM Excellence Model (2012) SAR Executive Summary II

7 Key Outcomes One of the most critical areas of our self-assessment is the review and comparison of our performance with the industry trends, essential in establishing our planning and actions which impact on our competitive position. A review of the information presented in the regulators annual reports was undertaken to support this aim. The Ofqual Annual Qualifications Market Report 2014/2015 (published August, 2016) was used to obtain an overview of the market trends for regulated qualifications in England. Similarly, the SQA Accreditation Annual Review for 2015/2016 (published July, 2016) was used to obtain an overview of the qualification market size and trends in Scotland. Outcomes of the comparisons of industry benchmarks contributed into the identification of strengths and areas for improvement. Key outcomes are summarised in Table I. Summary of Key Outcomes in 2015 The industry trends The industry trends Supply and demand in England, Wales and Northern Ireland (2014/2015): Nine of the 15 sector subject areas saw a decrease in the number of learner achievements in other qualifications. Level 2 qualification achievements account for 37% of all achievements in qualifications other than GCSE and A level. The number of total achievements ( other qualifications, GCSE and A/AS level) decreased by 4% (from 16.6 to 15.9 million), which is primarily due to changes in school entry patterns and accountability frameworks. The number of achievements in other qualifications decreased by 4% (from 8.8 to 8.4 million), which is likely to be due to changes in funding and the accountability framework. The number of achievements in QCF qualifications decreased by 7% (from 5.8 to 5.5 million). QCF remains the largest type of qualifications in terms of achievements. Qualifications developed to meet the QCF requirements accounted for 84% of qualifications with recorded achievements. The number of achievements in functional skills decreased by 4% (from 1,075,800 to 1,034,800 million). Functional skills is the third largest type of qualifications in terms of achievements. The number of available qualifications decreased by 2% (from 24,965 to 24,500) of which about 14,400 recorded an achievement. The largest increase (35%) was in achievements in other general qualifications (from 943,400 to 1,274,700), which has surpassed functional skills as the largest qualification type; mainly due to the large increases in Level 1/Level 2. The total number of awarding organisations decreased by 2% to 163 from 166 the previous year. The overall qualifications market remains highly concentrated, with 20 awarding organisations accounting for 90% of all achievements. Supply and demand in Scotland (2015/2016): Registrations for SVQ qualifications showed an increase of 2% (46,620) and certifications a decrease of 4% (33,856). At the end of the operational year there were 38 SQA Accreditation approved awarding bodies (two less than last year). The number of available accredited qualifications of the three qualification types was 993. SVQs are offered by 15 different approved awarding bodies, and account for 66% of all accredited qualifications. 84 qualifications were withdrawn by awarding bodies due to low or zero uptake and also as a result of SQA Accreditation invoking the Zero Uptake Policy. In some instances, SVQs were replaced with alternative accredited competence-based qualifications. The largest number of available accredited qualifications are at SVQ levels 2 and 3 resultant of them being a mandatory qualification in Modern Apprenticeships. Of level 2 and 3 SVQs, 77% and 86% are present in Modern Apprenticeships respectively. Currently, 22 SVQ 4 qualifications and 7 SVQ 5 qualifications are part of Apprenticeship frameworks. SAR Executive Summary III

8 Summary of Key Outcomes in 2015 Our awarding Ofqual: status and Ofqual awarding organisation status was maintained (including QCF accreditation and NQF Functional Skills status). 1st4sport was subject to two remote Ofqual audits (the Qualification Lifecycle and the Statement of Compliance audit) in levels October/November Outcomes of these activities are yet to be confirmed. 1st4sport has been subject to an on-site Ofqual audit focussing on the awarding of Functional Skills qualifications. The outcomes were positive and the regulator were reassured of our. Qualifications Wales: Our market share Supply of our qualifications (plan of provision) Demand for our qualifications Qualifications Wales awarding organisation status was maintained. 1st4sport has not been subject to any audits by Qualifications Wales since the devolvement of the UK regulators. SQA Accreditation: SQA awarding body approval status has been maintained for our SVQ qualification. 1st4sport has not been subject to any audits by the SQA Accreditation. England, Wales and Northern Ireland: 1st4sport is ranked on the 21st position (from 25th last year) amongst 163 awarding organisations who recorded achievements in other qualifications across 15 sectors. 1st4sport operates across five sectors and is the second (from third last year) largest awarding organisation in the leisure, travel and tourism (416,000 recorded achievements in the sector), amongst 47 recognised awarding organisations operating in this sector. The 1st4sport Level 1 Award in Coaching Football (QCF) is listed in the top 50 largest qualifications in terms of achievements (with 23,155 achievements) across all regulated qualifications (46th position). Scotland: 1st4sport is ranked on the 30th position amongst 38 awarding organisations who recorded achievements in all qualifications. England, Wales and Northern Ireland: 1st4sport offered 255 qualifications with 18 new 1st4sport qualifications being developed and accredited (pathways, disciplines and addon modules are counted as separate qualifications). Scotland: 1st4sport continues to deliver the SVQ 3 in Leisure Management at SCQF Level 7 to ensure users needs are successfully met England, Wales and Northern Ireland: There has been an increase in the number of events (from 5,298 to 5,948) authorised to be delivered by 588 recognised centres. There has been both an increase in learner registrations (from 65,866 to 69,858) and certifications (from 57,198 to 59,759). Scotland: There has been an increase in the number of events (from 2 to 4) authorised to be delivered by three recognised centres. There has been both a decrease in learner registrations (from 65 to 63) and certifications (from 68 to 57). No incidents or access arrangements have been recorded for this qualification. Table I. Key Performance Outcomes SAR Executive Summary IV

9 Conclusion External drivers and industry trends influence awarding organisations future sustainability. Self-assessment has therefore become more imperative to provide an insight of our business performance. Contrary to the qualifications market trends, 2015 has been a successful year for 1st4sport. Successful regulatory audit outcomes, increased demand and expanded market share, new qualification development partnerships and key products developed have enabled us to positive trends. Most importantly, all these were achieved in a climate of continuously increased competition, evolving regulatory expectations and auditing, reductions in qualifications funding and the need for a more streamlined financial management system and supporting process effectiveness. As a result of the self-assessment process several strengths and areas for improvement were identified in our effort to achieve set business aims and continuous development. The identification of areas for improvement has led to the development of an improvement plan following the EFQM structure. The timescales in the publication of the Ofqual Annual Qualifications Market Report (August 2016) to enable a comparison of our performance against other organisations within the market has an impact on our improvement plan schedule. Therefore, longer timescales have been set for the achievement of our improvement plan. Our approach to lean leadership and excellence and our supporting interrelated systems have enabled us to sustain positive business results and maintain our awarding function. The implementation of our quality standards and a systematic strategic planning process ensure continuous improvements. Regardless of the limitations and given the availability of resources, the self-assessment has been a critical process in evaluating our performance and provided an insight into the levels of organisation excellence. It is therefore crucial that the outcomes of the self-assessment are communicated and improvement plan actions implemented. It is anticipated that maintenance of our strengths and the deployment of the improvement plan will enable us to sustain a competitive advantage and continue to work towards excellence in this challenging climate. Katerina Doutsiou Head of Business Excellence SAR Executive Summary V

10 1 Introduction 1.1 Overview 1st4sport Qualifications is an awarding organisation recognised and regulated in England by the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation (Ofqual), who also regulate vocational qualifications in Northern Ireland. 1st4sport are further regulated in Wales by Qualifications Wales and in Scotland by the Scottish Qualifications Authority Accreditation (SQA). We specialise in offering vocational and occupational qualifications to service the sport, physical activity and active leisure industry. We work in partnership with a variety of organisations, including Governing Bodies of Sport (GBS) and other organisations, to award qualifications across the following areas: coaching leadership spectator safety leisure operations and management education and training functional skills sports volunteering first aid and injury management horse racing physical education and school sport using sport to tackle youth crime employee rights and responsibilities exercise and fitness multi-skills development the outdoors sports performance sport officiating 1st4sport Qualifications is a brand of Coachwise Ltd, the trading arm of the National Coaching Foundation (known as sports coach UK), the UK-registered charity leading the development of coaches and the coaching system in the UK. Any proceeds go directly back to sports coach UK, to help them develop and advance sport in the UK. 1st4sport Qualifications Mission Statement To provide the sport, physical activity and active leisure industry with valid provision and value - added awarding services. To ensure the continuous development and maintenance of our awarding function within a culture of excellence, we have established The 1st4sport Leadership and Management Approach. This approach is based upon the systematic deployment of the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) Excellence Model (2012), which involves implementation of the EFQM criteria set as our quality standards. To facilitate effective implementation of the approach, the quality standards are integrated within our strategic planning and common process framework, providing our organisation with a sustainable advantage in sectors in which we operate. This is achieved through effective performance management, which enables us to ensure our and organisational performance levels are monitored, managed and improved across all operations. SAR 2015 Page 1 of 147

11 1.2 Self-assessment Self-assessment, as the integral component of performance management is the effective technique, which contributes to systematic continuous improvement and indicates the current level of our performance. In addition to the EFQM model s deployment as our quality management model, we also use it to conduct self-assessment, on which evaluation and diagnostics are based, with further deployment to enhance our overall performance. Our self assessment includes a rigorous self-evaluation of our performance against the regulations to determine levels, also using the principles of the model. The fundamental purpose of the self-assessment is to support quality improvement and measure progress against our journey to excellence. Systematic application of the EFQM model contributes significantly towards our aspiration to become Recognised for Excellence and ultimately achieving the EFQM Excellence Award. Self-assessment provides vital information in relation to the progress made, strengths and weaknesses and the simultaneous identification of causes and areas for improvement. The process itself increases organisational learning, staff awareness and establishes the basis for appropriate decision making. To this end, self-assessment as an effective performance management technique enables us to: maintain and manage our awarding function in line with our quality standards measure our process effectiveness and business performance (financial and non-financial) provide the regulatory authorities with relevant information on an operational and level obtain feedback to establish stakeholder satisfaction levels conduct benchmarking and make relative comparisons develop quality-oriented processes seek opportunities in achieving improvement and leading the improvement process implement a regular strategic and planning process to enable continuous improvement and increase the overall performance and quality level. SAR 2015 Page 2 of 147

12 1.3 The Self-assessment Process The process of self-assessment is continuous in order to obtain improved results on an annual basis and sustainability over the years. It is considered as a holistic perspective, which delivers greater results and full potential. To support this, self-assessment is undertaken in line with a defined process to ensure the effectiveness and validity of results, as indicated in the process diagram. The self-assessment process Data generated, performance measured Establish and communicate plan for self-assessment Plan produced and communicated Liaise with relevant employees for the collation of performance measurement data Data collected Evaluate and assess performance against EFQM criteria Evaluation and assessment conducted Organise representation of performance results Head of Business Excellence Head of Business Excellence Performance results organised Head of Business Excellence Head of Business Excellence Produce annual selfassessment report using the established structure Report produced Forward selfassessment report to Strategic Management Team for feedback Feedback obtained Review feedback and amend report (where required) Feedback reviewed Publish selfassessment report Self-assessment undertaken, outcomes published Head of Business Excellence Head of Business Excellence Head of Business Excellence Head of Business Excellence Diagram 1.1 Self-assessment process 1.4 The Self-assessment Report A number of quantitative and qualitative data collection tools are used to facilitate valid and reliable performance outcomes. Our performance is then evaluated and outcomes validated via the RADAR assessment and management tool, and the self-analysis matrix. The combination of approaches enables the triangulation and accuracy of outcomes and ensures that self-assessment is conducted against the breadth of our quality standards on a holistic and integrated perspective. Outcomes are published in the self-assessment report annually on completion of the self-assessment process and made available to all stakeholders. The structure of the self-assessment report is based on the EFQM model, which facilitates an integrated approach to striving for organisational excellence. Strengths, areas for improvements and the resultant improvement plan, in line with the EFQM model, conclude the report. SAR 2015 Page 3 of 147

13 2 Methodology 2.1 Performance Management To generate valid data and understand the cause and effect relationship of the results appropriate performance measurement mechanisms are systematically utilised in the methodical evaluation and management of our performance. Performance measurement as an established process enables the identification of trends and a thorough analysis of our achievements and deficiencies. Implementation of our performance measurement process is shown in diagram 2.1. The Performance Measurement Process Audit and evaluate regulatory Audit and evaluate strategic and financial achievement Audit and evaluate plan of provision achievement Audit and evaluate partnership and consultancy effectiveness System ready for implementation Head of Business Excellence Head of Business Excellence Head of Business Development Head of Business Development Data generated, performance measured Audit and evaluate stakeholder satisfaction Audit and evaluate qualification performance Audit and evaluate improvement plan achievement Audit and evaluate against industry benchmarks and competitors Head of Business Excellence Head of Business Excellence Head of Business Excellence Head of Business Excellence Diagram 2.1 Performance measurement process Our integrated performance measurement tools serve to maintain and increase the level of quality, leading to effective decision-making and future strategic planning. Upon successful implementation of our measurement tools and process performance, data and results are generated and utilised to conduct self-assessment, in line with the EFQM model. SAR 2015 Page 4 of 147

14 In evaluating our current management s and for the conduct of self-assessment a number of approaches data collection methods and tools (table 2.1) were utilised to obtain valid and reliable outcomes. Performance measurement tools and representation of outcomes Tools Outcomes Data collection method/source Data classification Type of analysis Representation Regulatory reports Education industry trends Ofqual report and SQA review Quantitative feedback Descriptive statistics chart/table 1st4sport key performance statistics Strategic direction analysis Self-evaluation against regulations Trends in CR/QAP statuses Trends in accredited qualifications Trends in course authorisations Trends in learner registrations Trends in learner certifications Trends in learner participation by gender Trends in learner participation by age Trends in learner participation by ethnicity Disability types in learner participation Trends in access arrangement requests Athena Quantitative feedback Comparisons of descriptive statistics Athena, Parnassus Quantitative feedback Comparisons of descriptive statistics Parnassus Quantitative feedback Comparisons of descriptive statistics Parnassus Quantitative feedback Comparisons of descriptive statistics Parnassus Quantitative feedback Comparisons of descriptive statistics Parnassus Quantitative feedback Comparisons of descriptive statistics Parnassus Quantitative feedback Comparisons of descriptive statistics Parnassus Quantitative feedback Comparisons of descriptive statistics Parnassus Quantitative feedback Comparisons of descriptive statistics Athena Quantitative feedback Comparisons of descriptive statistics Trends in incidents Athena Quantitative feedback Comparisons of descriptive statistics Achievement rate Compliance with regulations Athena, Parnassus, Formic, Maginus chart chart chart chart chart chart chart chart chart chart chart Quantitative feedback Descriptive statistics chart/table Regulatory requirements Quantitative feedback RADAR table SAR 2015 Page 5 of 147

15 Tools Outcomes Data collection method/source Data classification Type of analysis Representation Stakeholder satisfaction survey Stakeholder satisfaction levels Formic Quantitative feedback Descriptive statistics chart Learner evaluation form Learner satisfaction levels Formic Quantitative feedback Descriptive statistics chart Employee satisfaction questionnaire Employee satisfaction levels Survey Quantitative feedback Descriptive statistics chart Qualitative feedback Deductive Analysis table Feedback forum form EQA satisfaction levels on CPD Formic Quantitative feedback Descriptive statistics chart/table Qualification specific performance statistics Variance in qualification demand Parnassus Quantitative feedback Descriptive statistics chart Analysis of enquiries Athena Quantitative feedback Descriptive statistics chart Analysis of incidents Athena Quantitative feedback Descriptive statistics chart Analysis of actions and recognised centre risk profile Analysis of access arrangements Athena Quantitative feedback Descriptive statistics chart/table Athena Quantitative feedback Descriptive statistics chart Analysis of EQA intervention Athena Quantitative feedback Descriptive statistics chart/table Table 2.1 Performance measurement tools and representation of outcomes In the collection, processing and analysis of the above set of data a number of IT systems and software are used as shown below: Athena the 1st4sport Quality Assurance System Parnassus - the 1st4sport Awarding Service System Maginus Stock, Sale and Management Software Formic Survey Design and Deployment Software. SAR 2015 Page 6 of 147

16 2.2 The EFQM Excellence Model Amongst the numerous management tools and techniques commonly used by organisations, the EFQM Excellence Model was selected as the most appropriate model, due its ability to provide a holistic view of the organisation. The model is therefore used as a quality management model, representing an overarching framework based on our needs and awarding function for developing sustainable excellence, but also as a self-assessment tool. The great benefit that can be obtained from the effective use of the model, which leads to sustainable success, is based on the three integrated components: The Fundamental Concepts of Excellence The EFQM Excellence Model RADAR logic Use of these three integrated components enables organisations of all sizes and from all sectors to compare themselves with the attributes, qualities and achievements of sustainable organisations and also ensures that management s form a coherent system that is continually improved and delivers the intended strategy for the organisation The Fundamental Concepts of Excellence The Fundamental Concepts of Excellence are the underlying principles and form the essential foundation for sustainable excellence. Used as the basis to describe the attributes of an excellent organisational culture they also serve as a common language for senior management. Figure 2.1 The Fundamental Concepts of Excellence SAR 2015 Page 7 of 147

17 2.2.2 The EFQM Model The EFQM model indicates the areas an organisation should focus on in order to improve performance and competitive positioning. The model represents a holistic view of quality concepts, which are required to be developed and linked to our processes to accomplish positive results. The model consists of nine assessment criteria and 32 sub-criteria, which comprise our quality standards. The dynamic nature of the model and a brief explanation of what the nine criteria represent within our organisation are shown in figure 2.2 and table 2.2. Figure 2.2 The EFQM Excellence Model (2012) Our decision to implement the EFQM and the quality standards was based upon its capacity to enhance performance and to provide consistent, valid and relevant performance results. Execution of the EFQM as a self assessment model: promotes sharing and dissemination of information on successfully deployed strategies and derived benefits facilitates in achieving quality improvements and can be used for benchmarking activity against other awarding bodies stimulates systematic self-assessment against the designed criteria and the market industry promotes consensus of our strengths and areas for improvement enables measurement of our progress, key developments and respective growth. SAR 2015 Page 8 of 147

18 EFQM enablers criteria and sub-criteria (1st4sport quality standards) 1 Leadership (how are our leaders/senior managers lead to develop a better organisation) 1a Leaders develop the mission, vision, values, and ethics and act as role models 1b Leaders define, monitor, review and drive the improvement of the organisation s management system and performance 1c Leaders engage with customers, partners and representatives of society 1d Leaders reinforce a culture of excellence with the organisation s people 1e Leaders ensure that the organisation is flexible and manages change effectively 2 Strategy (where the organisation is going and how it will get there) 2a Strategy is based on understanding the needs and expectations both stakeholders and the external environment ecological sustainability 2b Strategy is based on understanding internal performance and capabilities 2c Strategy and supporting policies are developed, reviewed and updated to ensure economic, societal and ecological sustainability 2d Strategy and supporting policies are communicated and deployed through plans, processes and objectives 3 People (how we manage our employees) 3a Peoples plans support the organisations strategy 3b Peoples knowledge and capabilities are developed 3c People are aligned, involved and empowered 3d People communicate effectively throughout the organisation 3e People are rewarded, recognised and cared for 4 Partnerships and Resources (how we make best use of what we have or need) 4a Partners and suppliers are managed for sustainable benefit 4b Finances are managed to secure sustained success 4c Buildings, equipment, materials and natural resources are managed in a sustainable way 4d Technology is managed to support the delivery of strategy 4e Information and knowledge are managed to support effective decision making and to build the organisational capability Processes, Products and Services (how we manage and improve what we do, how we ensure customer focus before and after our 5 product/service delivery 5a Processes are designed and managed to optimise stakeholder value 5b Products and services are developed to create optimum value for customers 5c Products and services are effectively promoted and marketed 5d Products and services are produced, delivered and managed 5e Customer relationships are managed and enhanced SAR 2015 Page 9 of 147

19 EFQM results criteria and sub-criteria (1st4sport quality standards) 6 Customer Results (are our customers satisfied and want to continue to do business with us) 6a Perceptions 6b Performance Indicators 7 People Results (are our employees satisfied) 7a Perceptions 7b Performance Indicators 8 Society Results (how do we ensure with regulations and contribute to the society; what do they think of us) 8a Perceptions 8b Performance Indicators 9 Business results (are we achieving as much as we could to ensure our sustainability) 9a Business Outcomes 9b Business Performance Indicators Table 2.2 EFQM criteria and sub-criteria (1st4sport quality standards) The nine structured assessment criteria enable the analysis of the cause and effect relationship between what the organisation does and the results to be achieved. As shown in table 2.1 five of these criteria act as 'Enablers' and four as 'Results'. The 'Enabler' criteria cover what we do as an organisation and the way we do it whilst the 'Results' criteria cover what we should be working towards to achieve. Each of the nine criteria has a definition, which describes what each criterion involves. To develop the high level meaning further, each criterion is supported by sub-criteria. The RADAR tool facilitates the assessment and scoring of the level of each sub-criterion. Therefore, to ensure that benefits are obtained from the effective application of the model, the components of the fundamental concepts of excellence and the RADAR logic were utilised across the 32 sub-criteria to conduct self-assessment, ensuring a multidimensional approach. SAR 2015 Page 10 of 147

20 2.2.3 The RADAR logic The third component, the RADAR logic as shown in Figure 2.3, is a dynamic assessment framework and powerful management tool, which provides the backbone to support an organisation. Due to the particular design and structure, it enables the identification of strengths and areas for improvement, using a structured and logical approach to assess the organisational performance. The RADAR supports the scoring mechanism behind the EFQM Excellence Award and other recognition/assessment schemes, and can help to lead change and manage improvement projects. Figure 2.3 The RADAR logic Most importantly, the RADAR is an integral tool of the EFQM model which was used to assess and manage performance and indicate our level of excellence against the nine criteria and 32 sub-criteria of the model. RADAR ensures that diagnosis is based on an objective and analytical approach to determine the relative progress made each year. SAR 2015 Page 11 of 147

21 Using the evidence generated from the breadth of our established performance measurement tools the RADAR scale was applied to assess each approach, which reflects the overall score. The RADAR tool has been implemented for the past few years in the conduct of the selfassessment. This has allowed for comparisons on our performance over the years to be made, and across other organisations, regardless of the type of activity or sector who implement the EFQM model. This is in turn, makes the identification of strengths and required improvements required easier The RADAR logic comprises of the following four elements; Results, Approach, Deployment, Assessment and Refinement. In using the RADAR logic we reviewed whether we: Determine the Results we aim for as part of our strategy (scope/integrity/segmentation/trends/targets/comparisons/causes) Plan and develop integrated set of sound Approaches (arrangements, processes, etc.) to deliver the required results Deploy our approaches in a structured way to ensure implementation Assess and Refine our deployed approaches based on monitoring and analysis of the results achieved and ongoing learning activities. These elements represent our quality indicators used for the identification of performance levels and subsequent improvement plan. The use of the RADAR approach and related quality indicators determine the score, which reflects the level of performance and quality levels, achieved. The score contributes to the decision-making of the relevant actions, which form an improvement plan for each year. The application of RADAR enables an evaluation of performance levels across different operational areas to be conducted and provides justification for the outcomes. However, as with every method RADAR entails some limitations. The RADAR does not evidently reflect the causal relationship interpretation between the methods used and the results obtained. It requires thorough analysis and multidimensional feedback via the conduct of workshops and related consensus meetings to validate the outcomes. There is a high risk of subjectivity when this method is used by a single individual or assessor and validity of score could be questioned. To ensure that the assessor s subjectivity is limited a consensus meeting was conducted following sufficient training, which served to increase the effort of our journey to excellence by expanding the methods applied and validating the outcomes thoroughly. SAR 2015 Page 12 of 147

22 A representation of the way the RADAR logic and principles were applied is summarised in the RADAR scoring matrix. The score evidence sourced from the performance measurement tools was assessed in line with the RADAR scoring matrix to identify our current performance level against each sub criterion. Structured diagnosis and methodical assessment of available evidence was conducted using a scoring scale of 0% - 100%. The scores resulting from the assessment of the nine elements (five Enabler criteria and four Results criteria) were added together to make up the overall score for the specific year. The RADAR tool for Enablers Approach Guidance Unable to Limited ability to Fully able to Recognised as Global Role Model Sound The approaches have a clear rationale, based on the relevant stakeholder needs, and are process based. Integrated The approaches support strategy and are linked to other approaches as appropriate. Deployment Implemented Structured The approaches are implemented in relevant areas, in a timely manner. The execution is structured and enables flexibility and organisational agility. Assessment and Refinement Measurement The effectiveness and efficiency of the approaches and their deployment are appropriately measured. Learning & Creativity Improvement & Innovation Learning and creativity is used to generate opportunities for improvement or innovation. Outputs from measurement, learning and creativity are used to evaluate, prioritise and implement improvements and innovations. Scale 0% 25% 50% 75% 100% Overall Score SAR 2015 Page 13 of 147

23 The RADAR tool for Results Relevance & Usability Scope & Relevance Integrity Guidance A coherent set of results, including key results, are identified that the performance of the organisation in terms of its strategy, objectives and the needs and expectations of the relevant stakeholders. Results are timely, reliable and accurate. Unable to Limited ability to Fully able to Recognised as Global Role Model Segmentation Results are properly segmented to provide meaningful insights. Performance Trends Positive trends or sustained good performance over at least 3 years. Targets Comparisons Confidence Relevant targets are set and consistently achieved for the key results, in line with the strategic goals. Relevant external comparisons are made and are favourable for the key results, in line with the strategic goals. There is confidence that performance levels will be sustained into the future, based on established cause & effect relationships. Scale 0% 25% 50% 75% 100% Overall Score Regardless of the limitations, RADAR was used to enhance the integration between the implementation of the model/quality standards and reporting of the performance levels via self-assessment. Primarily, we strive to increase the effort on our journey to excellence by expanding the methods applied and validating the outcomes thoroughly to ensure a coherent system is continually improved and delivers the intended strategy. SAR 2015 Page 14 of 147

24 2.3 Self-assessment validation approaches A number of approaches are available for the conduct of self-assessment or can be used to support and triangulate the RADAR outcomes. However, there is no distinguished approach, each delivers different benefits and requires alternative resources. Approaches are recognised as successful when they suit the corporate culture and used to foster participation. In assessing our performance against the EFQM criteria the self-analysis matrix and workshop were identified as the most appropriate selfassessment approaches. Critical factors with regards to the potential success of each approach to self-assessment via the EFQM model were considered prior to any decision-making. This was primarily based on the resource availability/requirements and the accuracy of the selfassessment approach. Evaluation of these factors can assist the identification of the deliverables of each approach. Key factors that have affected the benefits and/or limitations of the approach were analysed and identified as below: limited engagement from senior management team time restrictions availability/compatibility of information systems and data finance and related costs training of allocated personnel corporate culture and current quality management/maturity level. Selected approaches must therefore be adapted to the organisation s needs and maturity level to meet the specific requirements, within the several boundaries of the conduct of self-assessment The self-analysis matrix as the selected validation approach In using the tailored matrix the RADAR outcomes were triangulated and validated, therefore ensuring an accurate evaluation of our performance levels across different operational areas together with a rationale for the outcomes. The self-analysis matrix was primarily selected due to its transparent and practical features in determining the current level of performance punctually. The matrix is one of the quickest and easiest approaches used by all employees. It represents the practical step for introducing self-assessment and at the same time is the simplest method to administer. It requires minimal training and provides a visual gap analysis to address the strengths and areas for improvement. Furthermore, it is a means of involving everyone in the self-assessment process and supports team discussion. The matrix approach can be used at any level with linkages to wider target setting, providing a view of our progress. Extensive analysis of the identified approaches against the training, time limitations and the development level supported that the matrix approach is the most advantageous to ensure our corporate facets and culture are appropriately explored. The self-analysis matrix is a pre-validated evaluation tool, which provides a score towards the EFQM criteria and enables the assessment of the organisation s relevant areas. The development of the tailored matrix was based on the UK North West Quality Award Model organisational self-analysis matrix. It consists of statements of achievements per criterion, which describe different levels of performance ranging between a number of points on a scale of 1-10, results of which are presented in section 3.3 EFQM self-analysis matrix responses of this report. SAR 2015 Page 15 of 147

25 The matrix has been used for the past few years with minor changes in the statements to reflect the revised version of the EFQM model in 2012 and to provide an insight on our performance levels and related sustainability. The statements developed by our self-assessment team were adapted to increase respondents understanding ensuring they were specific to the awarding function without deviating from the standard matrix concepts, maintaining the validity of the score. The statements were subsequently piloted with respondents to facilitate face validity and with the Quality Management Team for content validity. Prior to the completion of the matrix, 1st4sport employees received training on the linkage between the matrix and the EFQM model in order to identify the statement, which on their opinion best reflects the current level of our performance. The practical format, transparency and range of statements enabled the respondent to identify quickly and easily the level of the organisation. Resultant of this, an insight into our performance levels were provided, based on an overall score. The matrix score was then compared to the RADAR score. The statements refer to specific s and processes which could provide a checklist to identify areas for improvement. Despite the fact that the structural range of statements facilitates the identification of improvement levels, it does not evidently reflect the identification of strengths and areas for improvement. As every organisation and their respective statements are different, it is difficult to make comparisons with the industry average using benchmarks of the scores achieved. Where this approach is to be used in conjunction with the RADAR and the workshop approach, these limitations are significantly reduced The workshop as the selected validation approach Precautions were taken to preserve the validity of the matrix score and limit the risk of subjectivity; hence the workshop was selected as an additional approach to validate the matrix results via the conduct of a consensus meeting to establish the RADAR score. As a developing organisation aiming to apply for the EFQM recognition scheme in the future, we made increased efforts to ensure validity. The workshop approach consists of five distinct phases of training, data collection, scoring workshop, prioritisation of improvement actions and review of progress. Following the process of data collection and training the self-assessment team conducted the scoring workshop. Subsequently a second scoring workshop took place, where the senior management team reviewed the score to reach a consensus and agree on strengths and areas for improvement required. The significance of this process lies in active involvement and in the development of team-working environment. This also helps to limit the degree of subjectivity when assessment is conducted by a single assessor. As with every approach, it has risks, such as the requirement for assessors to be trained/qualified or providing unrealistic and un-objective assessment resulting in possibly over-generous and inaccurate scoring. However, there are considerable benefits; the process itself increases organisational awareness, creativity and innovation and enables problem solving based on the opportunity for thorough analysis, discussion and effective communication. The workshop approach helps to identify gaps and allows the organisation to take preventive and corrective action to redress deficiencies. Most importantly, it enables benchmarks to be established, which could be compared to other organisations that use the RADAR scoring system when self-assessing against the EFQM model. Based on the aforementioned benefits it was decided that the workshop approach will not only become a standard approach for self-assessment, but also an integral part of our effort for continuous improvement and excellence. SAR 2015 Page 16 of 147

26 2.4 Type of Analysis As a result of the use of established performance measurement tools quantitative and qualitative data was generated. Analysis of descriptive statistics and inductive thematic analysis were the two main data analysis methods, which were used as appropriate to enable accurate treatment of data and validation of results. a) Descriptive statistics: present the main features of a collection of quantitative data with the aim of summarising a data set. Representation of descriptive statistics via graphic visuals provided an overview of simple summaries about the sample and the measures hence forming the basis of the quantitative analysis. Due to organisational needs and time constraints descriptive statistics are used as opposed to conducting an analysis on the basis of probability theory. Despite the risk of misrepresenting the original data or failing to see key detail, when describing a large set of observations with a single indicator, descriptive statistics provide a powerful summary that may enable comparisons across measures. This approach is not only broadly used and simple but also meets our objective of analysing and presenting statistics in an efficient and comprehensive way. b) General inductive analysis: involves a process designed to condense raw qualitative data into categories or themes based on valid inference and interpretation. It is considered as a "bottom up" approach, moving from specific observations to broader generalizations and theories. This means that the patterns, themes, and categories of analysis "emerge out of the data rather than being imposed on them prior to data collection and analysis" (Patton, 1990). The rationale for using this approach for the analysis of qualitative data was to explore the usage of words/indicators, which resulted from the data collection methods, in an inductive manner and code them into relevant categories to establish a clear link between raw data and key findings. The outcome from the inductive analysis of raw data was the development of key themes/categories into a summative format, which led to the clear identification of strengths and areas for improvement. 2.5 Treatment of data, evidence and identification of trends A number of different sources, data collection methods and performance measurement tools were used to obtain and analyse qualitative and quantitative data, as presented in table 2.2. To enhance the validity, reliability and objectivity of outcomes a number of approaches were used and efforts made to ensure triangulation of the EFQM score and relevant outcomes. Upon completion of the treatment of data and identification of trends, the RADAR method of evaluating performance against the nine criteria and 32 sub-criteria of the EFQM model, which represent our quality standards, was applied and then compared with the score generated from the implementation of the self-analysis matrix. In addition, the workshop approach was also used to reach consensus on the RADAR score and to further increase the validity of outcomes. Despite the proactive approaches adopted throughout the self-assessment and the actions taken to ascertain the validity of results, the data should be treated with caution. SAR 2015 Page 17 of 147

27 The combination of methods used ensure triangulation of results and increase the validity of the score, which enabled an accurate evaluation of our performance levels across different operational areas, together with a rationale for the outcomes. Evidence for the evaluation of our performance was only used if it met the following criteria: valid to enable relevant and accurate results current relating to the past three to five years to enable comparisons and developing trends verifiable confirmed by accompanied documentation and statistics authentic resulting from valid sources and not being amended/manipulated. In some cases data represents individuals perceptions that may vary and deviate from the pragmatic state. At other times the data provides an indicative overview rather than an indisputable fact. The availability of data, based on the time of collection might also affect the validity of results. In light of the above, conclusions and identification of trends have been reached after careful consideration of impacted factors, to avoid misinterpretations and misuse of data. The increased use of IT-based system measurement tools has helped to minimise areas where perceptual data was the only source of evidence. Evidence generated via the deployment of IT-based systems has significantly increased the validity of results and associated conclusions. Despite the fact that the type of collection methods and evidence generated is integrated into our mission, strategy and intended results using a consistent structure, external factors and internal organisational changes in certain areas made comparisons of results and identification of trends difficult. As with every case of data analysis and statistical results conclusions are reached after careful consideration of the cause and effect relationship accompanied by reasoning. SAR 2015 Page 18 of 147

28 3. Results The purpose of this section is to present results from the established performance measurement and self-assessment tools. As we are a developing organisation that is continuing on the excellence journey, the RADAR assessment tool, in conjunction with the matrix and workshop validation approaches, were used to: evaluate the implementation of our quality standards indicate results of our performance for each sub-criterion of the EFQM reach consensus to determine the final score and our excellence level with regards to the EFQM. The RADAR and self-analysis matrix scores are slightly different, which can be explained easily due to the nature of the two methods; the selfanalysis matrix outcomes are based on peoples perceptions whilst the RADAR results are based on evaluation of factual evidence across the breadth of our performance measurement data and as a result of our consensus meeting. Despite the fact that the individual and total score might be to some extent different, trends in the scoring between the nine criteria are similar, which confirms the effective validation and triangulation of outcomes resulting from the methods used. 3.1 Analysis and representation of the EFQM scoring results The detailed score of our performance against the 32 sub-criteria of the EFQM model, which has derived from the evidence collected, analysed and assessed is not presented in this report due to the large amount of information, but is available upon request. The scoring summary against the nine criteria, presented in table 3.1, which shows how the individual scores resulted for each criterion based on the different weighting factors. The score achieved for each element is based on the evaluation of our performance against each sub-criterion, aligned to the relevant attributes, using a scale from 0% to 100%. The sum of each sub-criterion (divided by the number of sub-criteria) shows the score for the specific criterion, which is then multiplied by the relevant weighting factor to obtain the final score achieved on a scale of points. In order to achieve favourable outcomes we implement the EFQM to benefit from the dynamics of the model via the integration of enablers and results. Therefore, analysis and discussion of the outcomes is split into two parts; enablers (the leading indicators) and results (lagging indicators). This relationship shows the overall integration of the nine criteria within the model. The score of each criterion shown in the following pages is not the average of the sub-criteria; it is final criterion total after the weighting factor has been applied. The integration starts with the development of customer orientation, which is defined in the strategy (criterion 2) and is implemented throughout the organisation via a systematic deployment. Leadership (criterion 1) ensure effective integrated approaches are deployed to work towards this customer orientation. To achieve this, leaders establish valuable partnerships and make sufficient resources (criterion 4) and employees (criterion 3) available. Customer orientation is then supported by the development and implementation of processes (criterion 5). As presented in the RADAR assessment tool the fundamental elements of enablers and results are evaluated against the respective attributes based on the sufficiency and availability of evidence via the utilisation of numerous methods to obtain sources/data. Where low scores are attained this is usually due to lack of evidence to support the deployment, learning and benchmarking activities across the industry. SAR 2015 Page 19 of 147

29 The analysis of the self-assessment outcomes and particular structure of the discussion provides a view of the cause and effect linkage between enablers and results. In terms of enablers (criteria 1-5) evaluation of current approaches is undertaken based on the attributes of being sound, integrated, implemented, structured, and subject to measurement to ensure learning and creativity and improvement and innovation. The term approach is used to describe any procedures, processes, methods, tools, arrangements, etc. that are in place and show how we aim to operate in line with our quality standards, deliver efficiency and achieve the anticipated levels of excellence. Similarly, analysis and discussion of the results (criteria 6-9) is based on the grounds of positive trends, appropriate targets, comparisons, confidence, causes, scope and relevance, integrity and segmentation. 3.2 Weighting of EFQM Criteria In assessing our performance in line with the EFQM model the RADAR scoring matrix was used to determine the overall score. Based on the dynamic nature of the model different weights are given to each of the nine criteria. These weights were established in 1991 and were revised in 2012 as a result of a wide consultation exercise across Europe. With the exception of Customer results and Business results, whose weighting factor is 15% the remaining seven criteria have an equal weighting factor of 10%. Generally, each sub-criterion is allocated equal weight within that criterion, for example 1a attracts 20% of the points allocated to criterion 1. The two exceptions are criteria part 6a and 7a, which take 75% each whilst criterion part 6b and 7b take 25% of the points allocated for each criterion. Enablers Results 3. People 7. People Results 10% 10% 1. Leadership 10% 2. Strategy 10% 5. Processes, Products & Services 10% 6. Customer Results 15% 9. Business Results 15% 4. Partnerships & Resources 8. Society Results 10% 10% Learning, Creativity and Innovation Figure 3.1 The EFQM Excellence model weighting criteria (2012) SAR 2015 Page 20 of 147

30 RADAR scoring sheet (2015) Enablers Criteria 1. Leadership 2. Strategy 3. People 4. Partnerships & Resources 5. Processes, Products & Services Criterion Number 1 Score 2 Score 3 Score 4 Score 5 Score Criterion Part 1a 54 2a 73 3a 57 4a 74 5a 74 Criterion Part 1b 73 2b 73 3b 59 4b 64 5b 75 Criterion Part 1c 74 2c 66 3c 45 4c 55 5c 64 Criterion Part 1d 53 2d 63 3d 55 4d 85 5d 71 Criterion Part 1e 54 3e 53 4e 79 5e 76 Sum of Parts Divided by the number of criteria Score awarded for enablers Results Criteria 6. Customer Results 7. People Results 8. Society Results 9. Business Results Criterion Number 6 Score Factor Final 7 Score Factor Final 8 Score Factor Final 9 Score Factor Final Criterion Part 6a = 59 7a = 42 8a = 35 9a = 41 Criterion Part 6b = 19 7b = 13 8b = 33 9b = 40 Score awarded Calculation of Total Points Final Score Criteria Score Awarded Weighting Points Awarded 1. Leadership Strategy People Partnerships and Resources Processes, Products & Services Customer Results People Results Society Results Business Results Total points awarded 690 Table 3.1 RADAR scoring summary for the 32 sub-criteria SAR 2015 Page 21 of 147

31 Score The highest scores identified via the RADAR this year were achieved in Customer results and Business result. This is due to developments made over the past few years and also the high weighing factors used for these criteria. Evaluation outcomes showed that the lowest score was achieved in People enabler and People results criteria Leadership 2. Strategy 3. People 4. Partnership and Resources 54 EFQM RADAR score (2015) Processes, Products and Services Customer Results People Results Society Results Key Results Chart 3.1 Representation of the RADAR score per criterion (2015) EFQM Criteria In evaluating sustainability of our performance and associated trends it was deemed essential to compare the results with previous years. The individual RADAR scores do not appear to have fluctuated considerably. RADAR score (comparison of previous years results) Criteria Score Factor Score (2015) Score (2014) Score (2013) Score (2012) Score (2011) 1. Leadership Strategy People Partnerships and Resources Processes, Products & Services Customer Results People Results Society Results Business Results Total Table 3.2 Comparison of RADAR scores ( ) SAR 2015 Page 22 of 147

32 Score 3.3 EFQM self-analysis matrix responses and score Analysis of the responses of the tailored self-analysis matrix approach determined the score for each EFQM criterion. Raw data and responses per criterion are not presented in this report due to the large amount of information, but are available upon request. Correspondingly to the RADAR scores the highest scores identified via the self-analysis matrix were achieved in Customer results and Business results. Evaluation outcomes showed that the lowest scores were achieved in Strategy and People enabler criteria Self-analysis matrix score (2015) Leadership Strategy People Partnerships & Resources EFQM Criteria Processes, Products & Services Customer Results Chart 3.3 Representation of the self-analysis matrix score per criterion based on the revised weighting factors of the EFQM model People Results Society Results 91 Business Results As part of the comparison of our performance and trends with previous years it was found that the individual matrix scores do not appear to have fluctuated considerably. Self-analysis matrix score (comparison of previous years results) Criteria Score Factor Score (2015) Score (2014) Score (2013) Score (2012) Score (2011) 1. Leadership 5.8 x Strategy 4.9 x People 4.9 x Partnerships and Resources 5.6 x Processes, Products & Services 6.2 x Customer Results 6.4 x People Results 5.5 x Society Results 6.3 x Business Results 6.1 x Total Table 3.3 Comparison of matrix scores ( ) SAR 2015 Page 23 of 147

33 Score Comparison of RADAR and Matrix scores (2015) RADAR score Matrix score 0 Leadership Strategy People Partnerships and Resources Processes, Products & Services Customer Results People Results Society Results Business Results EFQM Criteria Chart 3.4 Comparison of scores awarded from the RADAR and the self-analysis matrix per criterion Comparison of the scores using the two evaluation and assessment methods have resulted in the scores being somewhat different. Despite the fact that the individual score against some criteria, trends in the scoring between the nine criteria are similar. Differences in the scoring between the RADAR and the matrix were anticipated due to the nature of the evaluation methods; the scoring from the self-analysis matrix uses perceptual data whilst the RADAR results are based on evaluation of factual evidence across the breadth of our performance measurement data and the workshop undertaken. The enabler criteria with most variation in score are found in Strategy, Partnerships and Resources. In the results criteria this is found in Customer and Business Results. SAR 2015 Page 24 of 147

34 3.4 Synopsis of EFQM Results Performance results from the evaluation against the implementation of our quality standards are presented in this section. Use of the RADAR assessment tool and self-analysis matrix provided a clear insight of our performance levels. On a global scale outcomes were positive, with some key upward trends identified and improvements made to our performance and provision of service. As a result of the self-assessment process several strengths and areas for improvement were identified. Thorough analysis of the outcomes provided an understanding of the cause and effect relationship between enablers (current 1st4sport arrangements, processes etc.) and results. The identification of areas for improvement has led to the development of an improvement plan following the EFQM structure supported by set implementation target dates and required resources to make the implementation easier. Despite the fact that this report focuses on the performance of the awarding organisation there are cases where, due to the corporate structure, reference is made to Coachwise. Consequently, the identified actions, priority levels and ownership attached to each action may link to specific supporting resources and processes require the involvement of individuals/teams of Coachwise. This enables teams and individuals to complete each action, managed through the Governance section of Athena. For the purpose of this report only a summary of the Improvement Plan is provided. Improvement Plan Summary EFQM Criterion 1. Leadership EFQM Sub Criterion 1a. Leaders develop the mission, vision, values, and ethics and act as role models 1b. Leaders define, monitor, review and drive the improvement of the organisation's management system and performance 1c. Leaders engage with customers, partners and representatives of society 1d. Leaders reinforce a culture of excellence with the organisation's people 1e. Leaders ensure that the organisation is flexible and manages change effectively Score Assessment scale outcome 50% 75% Fully able to 75% Fully able to 50% 50% Strengths None at this time Development of performance measurement tool (Athena-Governance) to provide a balanced set results, which leaders use for decision making when defining, monitoring, reviewing and driving improvement of the organisation's management system and performance. Established industry network resultant of leaders' active involvement across stakeholders. None at this time Web based tool (Athena - Change Management) developed to manage change systematically. Areas for improvement Leaders to attend best in leadership training, to increase awareness on innovative ways on how to act as role models to support the shared leadership culture. Adopt Lean Leadership/Six Sigma approach to drive organisational improvement. None at this time. Increase EFQM awareness through the deployment of the internal EFQM marketing campaign (business focus and posters). Integrate the web based tool (Athena - Change Management) developed to manage change systematically with other established approaches. SAR 2015 Page 25 of 147

35 EFQM Criterion 2. Strategy 3. People EFQM Sub Criterion 2a. Strategy is based on understanding the needs and expectations both stakeholders and the external environment ecological sustainability 2b. Strategy is based on understanding internal performance and capabilities 2c. Strategy and supporting policies are developed, reviewed and updated 2d. Strategy and supporting policies are communicated, implemented and monitored 3a. Peoples' plans support the organisations strategy 3b. Peoples' knowledge and capabilities are developed 3c. People are aligned, involved and empowered 3d. People communicate effectively throughout the organisation 3e. People are rewarded, recognised and cared for Score Assessment scale outcome 75% Fully able to 75% Fully able to 75% Fully able to 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% 50% Strengths Analysis of internal and external indicators to inform strategic planning to minimise the impact of regulatory, political and legal change. Effective performance measurement tools in place to generate valid information on internal performance levels and capabilities. Strategy is integrated and supported by clearly designed processes via the Common Process Framework (via Control). Strategy is integrated and supported by clearly designed processes via the Common Process Framework (via Control). None at this time. None at this time. None at this time. Automated IT notification tools support process based activities, initiating action for employees and EQAs. Organisational re-structure recognises employee loyalty and performance. Areas for improvement None at this time. Continue to explore new technology to ensure we respond to stakeholders needs. Review strategic direction developing global targets which are aligned to and executed across the organisational structure. None at this time. Revise organisational structure ensuring employees roles and plans are aligned to the business direction. Deploy the revised organisational structure; ensuring employees are effectively orientated into their revised roles in order to maximise their contribution. Initiate the practical problem solving (PPS) sessions to empower employees; increasing participation, innovation and creativity. Distribute e-bulletins (to partners, centres, EQAs) instead of newsletters to improve communication methods. Establish working groups to improve communication channels internally. Initiate employee recognition scheme via Business Focus. SAR 2015 Page 26 of 147

36 EFQM Criterion EFQM Sub Criterion 4a. Partners and suppliers are managed for sustainable benefit Score Assessment scale outcome 75% Fully able to Strengths Well established qualification development partnerships with governing bodies of sport and other technical partners provide extensive expertise to support the development, delivery and awarding of qualifications in current and new markets. Areas for improvement Revise the partnership approach to ensure sustainable mutual benefits. 4. Partnerships and Resources 4b. Finances are managed to secure sustained success 4c. Buildings, equipment, materials and natural resources are managed in a sustainable way 4d. Technology is managed to support the delivery of strategy 75% Fully able to 50% 75% Fully able to Employee contribution to financial decisions on products and services to ensure relevance and competitive advantage. None at this time. Ability to respond swiftly to change via the use of enhanced IT portfolio. Train employees to use the standardised approach to financial reporting (cost cards). Minimise the use of paper and create office space through the development of a streamlined technology portfolio Integrate 1st4sport QA and Awarding systems to increase stakeholder satisfaction and operational effectiveness. Deploy e-learning and e-assessment mechanisms to respond to demand. 4e. Information and knowledge are managed to support effective decision making and to build the organisational capability 75% Fully able to Effective data collection and transformation into information/knowledge, which is shared via innovative IT solutions. Analyse quarterly regulatory reports to inform business planning. SAR 2015 Page 27 of 147

37 EFQM Criterion 5. Processes, Products and Services 6. Customer Results EFQM Sub Criterion 5a. Processes are designed and managed to optimise stakeholder value 5b. Products and services are developed to create optimum value for customers 5c. Products and services are effectively promoted and marketed 5d. Products and services are produced, delivered and managed 5e. Customer relationships are managed and enhanced Score Assessment scale outcome 75% Fully able to 75% Fully able to 75% Fully able to 75% Fully able to 75% Fully able to 6a. Perceptions 75% Fully able to 6b. Performance Indicators 75% Fully able to Strengths Processes are developed and managed using an innovative approach (Control) to establish and manage the Common Process Framework. Conduct of research to develop the portfolio in line with needs of potential customer groups. Partner network ensures effective distribution channels for specified products. Effective supply chain on site for the development, dispatch and awarding of products. Strong relationships with key customers. Positive perceptions on 1st4sport s capability to ensure each qualification adds value to the career/role pathway of learners. Positive perceptions on 1st4sport s reputation and image within the education industry. Areas for improvement Continuously update the Common Process Framework. Initiate competitor analyses to increase innovation, improve products and create optimum value for customers. Improve speed, responsiveness, functionality and design of 1st4sport website. Conduct internal audits (quality checks) on specific areas where gaps/issues are identified to minimise deficiencies. Consider employers as the ultimate customers; initiating consultations throughout the development, delivery and after the awarding of qualifications. Reduce customer dissatisfaction in relation to the use of two different awarding systems by integrating the functions of Athena and Parnassus. None at this time. SAR 2015 Page 28 of 147

38 EFQM Criterion EFQM Sub Criterion Score scale Assessment outcome Strengths Areas for improvement 7. People Results 7a. Perceptions 50% 7b. Performance Indicators 50% None at this time. None at this time. Recommend that the appraisal process is less subjective and that the organisation explores innovated management techniques Recommend that career development, pay scales and job descriptions are reviewed Improve morale, proactivity and recogniton of staff through practical problems solving sessions Use lean leadership activities to solve human resource issues. Increase the opportunities for employees further learning, development and career growth Improve the quality of building/facilities Develop the organisational culture and working environment. 8. Society Results 8a. Perceptions 75% Fully able to 8b. Performance Indicators 75% Fully able to Positive perceptions on 1st4sport s capability to embrace ethical, environmental, legal and regulatory responsibility throughout its activities. Compliance status is maintained across regulators based on audit outcomes. Initiate destination studies. Conduct research activities to evaluate participation trends and inclusion across our qualifications. 9. Business results 9a. Perceptions 75% Fully able to 9b. Performance Indicators 75% Fully able to Positive perceptions on 1st4sport s capability to ensure the development and maintenance of effective business relationships with its stakeholders, resulting in business loyalty. Competitive position maintained in the industry (being the second largest AO in terms of achievements in sector 8, ranked 21th of the 163 AOs recording achievements in other qualifications). Research, benchmarking and competitor analyses must be prioritised in the design and review of qualifications. The outcomes must be used to ensure a demand led approach ensuring fit for purpose qualification packages which meet employer and industry needs. Research, benchmarking and competitor analyses must be prioritised in the strategic direction. SAR 2015 Page 29 of 147

39 3.5 Limitations of the self-assessment process and future recommendations (reflective ) Limitations Timescales of the publication of Ofqual s annual market qualification report Review and comparative analysis of the annual qualifications market s report information published by Ofqual is an essential part of the self-assessment process. The timescales of the report publication has a substantial impact on the comparative analysis of key statistics and subsequent timescales for the completion of the self-assessment report. This also impacts significantly on the timely implementation of the improvement plan, the strategic linkages/required updates and respective business plans. Recommendations Use Ofqual s quarterly statistical reports to conduct the annual comparative analysis of performance and revise accordingly the timescales of the 1st4sport self-assessment plan and publication of report. Training and involvement of relevant team leaders in the RADAR consensus The consensus meeting, as part of the RADAR approach, involved the whole strategic management team and contributed to increased score validity and a more objective scope of evidence being assessed. This has helped to reduce the risks of subjectivity resultant of a single assessor conducting the RADAR evaluation. However, the score was formed based on the team s current knowledge of the EFQM model, the RADAR principles and approaches assessed. Were representatives from other departments trained on the EFQM and RADAR principles and involved in the consensus to assess their relevant areas the score might have been slightly different. Organisational awareness and time constraints contributed to this limitation. Increase the knowledge and understanding of our Strategic Management Team with regards to the application of the EFQM model via the re-alignment of the structure of working team group meetings. Involve specific process owners to assess relevant EFQM standards based on their area of work. Consistency and availability of valid evidence Process change, continuous redevelopments and system enhancements in our performance measurement tools affected the analysis and availability of data. In some occasions this has caused significant delays, made the identification of trends difficult but also enabled the identification of discrepancies in the data generated in previous years. Lack of information systems ability to generate specific evidence with regards to the measurement of our operational targets led to the use of perceptual data. This has possibly affected the validity/insufficiency of data and related results (awarding services related targets). Ensure continuous enhancements/ upgrades of information systems and in particular the measurement of our operational target achievement rate to increase validity of outcomes. SAR 2015 Page 30 of 147

40 3.6 Conclusion External drivers and industry trends influence awarding organisations future sustainability. Self-assessment has therefore become more imperative to provide an insight of our business performance. Contrary to the qualifications market trends, 2015 has been a successful year for 1st4sport. Successful regulatory audit outcomes, increased demand and expanded market share, new qualification development partnerships and key products developed have enabled us to positive trends. Most importantly, all these were achieved in a climate of continuously increased competition, evolving regulatory expectations and auditing, reductions in qualifications funding and the need for a more streamlined financial management system and supporting process effectiveness. Our key achievements are listed below: Ofqual awarding organisation status was maintained, with successful audit outcomes confirmed by the regulator. Qualifications Wales awarding organisation status was maintained. SQA awarding body approval status was maintained for our SVQ qualification. We are ranked on the 21st position (from 25th last year) amongst 163 recognised awarding organisations who recorded achievements in 2014/15 academic year in the market for all regulated qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland across 15 sectors. We are ranked on the 30th position amongst 38 awarding organisations who recorded achievements in all qualifications in Scotland. We are now the second largest (from third last year) awarding organisation in terms of achievements in sector 08 - Leisure, Travel and Tourism (416,000 recorded achievements in the sector), amongst 47 recognised awarding organisations operating in this sector. We continue to operate across 5 sector subject areas with a growing portfolio of our qualifications, offering 255 qualifications with 18 new 1st4sport qualifications being developed and accredited (pathways, disciplines and add-on modules are counted as separate qualifications) The demand for our qualifications has shown a consistent increase; the number of events authorised to be delivered by recognised centres continues to increase and was the largest (5,948 events) to date. In addition, there has been an increase in both learner registrations (from 65,866 to 69,858) and certifications (from 57,198 to 59,759). The 1st4sport Level 1 Award in Coaching Football (QCF) is listed in the top 50 largest qualifications in terms of achievements (with 23,155 achievements) across all regulated qualifications (46th position) in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. The number of learners with multiple 1st4sport qualifications continues to grow; 69,949 of our learners obtained more than one of our qualifications up until The largest number of 1st4sport Qualifications obtained by two of our learners is 13. Existing qualification development partnerships were effectively maintained and new ones established, facilitating our sustainability and expansion in new markets We continue to (re)design and explore innovative technology portfolio in support of our awarding function, confirmed by the increased use of our recognised centres. Our approach to lean leadership and excellence and our supporting interrelated systems have enabled us to sustain positive business results and maintain our awarding function. The implementation of our quality standards and a systematic strategic planning process ensure continuous improvements. Regardless of the limitations and given the availability of resources, the self-assessment has been a critical process in evaluating our performance and provided an insight into the levels of organisation excellence. It is therefore crucial that the outcomes of the self-assessment are communicated and improvement plan actions implemented. It is anticipated that maintenance of our strengths and the deployment of the improvement plan will enable us to sustain a competitive advantage and continue to work towards excellence in this challenging climate. SAR 2015 Page 31 of 147

41 Appendices Appendix 1 Education Industry Research and Key Trends (Ofqual Report and SQA Accreditation Annual Review) A Ofqual Annual Qualifications Market Report England, Wales and Northern Ireland Academic Year (9 August 2016) The Ofqual report provides an overview of the qualifications market, a single reference point and information about participants in the regulated qualifications market. It is fundamental for our future planning and sustainability as it offers information on the qualifications market needs based on demand and supply. Furthermore, it establishes a benchmark against which comparisons across awarding organisations and key projections can be made. The report presents information on Ofqual, the recognised awarding organisations and the regulated qualifications they offer, the numbers of qualifications regulated by Ofqual and the learner achievements recorded for the academic year 2014/15. Key Findings in 2014/2015 Trends by sector Nine of the 15 sector subject areas saw a decrease in the number of learner achievements in other qualifications. subject area The preparation for life and work sector remained the largest in terms of learner achievements in other qualifications (2.5 million), which accounts for 30% of all achievements. However, achievements in this sector have decreased by 7%. The health, public services and care sector is the second largest in achievements in other qualifications (1.2 million). Social sciences, language, literature and culture, and construction, planning and the built environment were the fastest growing sectors. Trends by level and Level 2 qualification achievements account for 37% of all achievements in qualifications other than GCSE and A level. type of qualification Eleven of the 16 qualification types saw a decrease in terms of number of achievements. Trends in demand Trends in supply Trends in learner achievements Trends in regulated qualifications Trends in market share The number of total achievements ( other qualifications, GCSE and A/AS level) decreased by 4% (from 16.6 to 15.9 million), which is primarily due to changes in school entry patterns and accountability frameworks. The number of achievements in other qualifications decreased by 4% (from 8.8 to 8.4 million), which is likely to be due to changes in funding and the accountability framework. The number of achievements in QCF qualifications decreased by 7% (from 5.8 to 5.5 million). QCF remains the largest type of qualifications in terms of achievements. The largest increase (35%) was in achievements in other general qualifications (from 943,400 to 1,274,700), which has surpassed functional skills as the largest qualification type; mainly due to the large increases in Level 1/Level 2. The number of achievements in functional skills decreased by 4% (from 1,075,800 to 1,034,800 million). Functional skills is the third largest type of qualifications in terms of achievements. The number of available qualifications decreased by 2% (from 24,965 to 24,500) of which about 14,400 recorded an achievement. This corresponds to 59% of available qualifications; 6% higher than in the previous year. Qualifications developed to meet the QCF requirements accounted for 84% of qualifications with recorded achievements. The total number of awarding organisations decreased by 2% to 163 from 166 the previous year. The overall qualifications market remains highly concentrated, with 20 awarding organisations accounting for 90% of all achievements. Pearson Education Ltd recorded nearly one-quarter (24%) of all achievements. 1st4sport is ranked on the 21st position (from 25th last year) amongst 163 awarding organisations who recorded achievements in other qualifications and the second largest awarding organisation in the leisure, travel and tourism sector. SAR 2015 Page 32 of 147

42 Learner achievements (in millions) A1.1 Demand for qualifications Outcomes from the analysis of the demand for qualifications for the 2014/15 academic year are presented in the following pages based on number of learner achievements for each qualification level, type, and subject sector area. A1.1.2 Total number of achievements in regulated qualifications The demand for qualifications presented in the following pages is based on the number of learner achievements recorded for each qualification. The classifications of qualification types, levels and sectors that are assigned to qualifications are analysed in groups, rather than individually. Between 2010/11 and 2014/15, the number of learner achievements has reduced by 2% (from 16.3 million to 16.0 million). The total number of achievements in 2014/15 saw a reduction of 4% compared to the previous year (from 16.6 to 16.0 million). Change in take-up of qualifications other than GCSE, AS, and A level is the biggest factor, with numbers of achievements decreasing by just over 4% (from 8.8 million to 8.4 million). This is likely to be due to changes in funding and the accountability framework that reduced the number of vocational qualifications recognised in schools for performance table purposes. The number of GCSE achievements decreased by just over 3% (from 5.6 million to 5.4 million). Achievements in AS and A level qualifications remained relatively stable with a decrease of less than 1% in 2014/15 compared to 2013/14. A number of factors are likely to have influenced these figures. In particular, as set out above, at GCSE, changes made to school performance tables and the structure of the qualification are likely to have been significant factors in the decrease in the number of certifications Trends in achievements recorded ( ) Other qualifications GCSE A/AS Level Total 2010/ / / / /2015 Chart A1.1 Trends in achievements in the qualifications market (Ofqual's RQAD and JCQ data) SAR 2015 Page 33 of 147

43 A1.1.3 Achievements in other qualifications by sector During 2014/15 nine of the 15 sector subject areas saw a decrease in the number of achievements. We specialise and are now the second largest awarding organisation (from third last year) in terms of achievements in the leisure, travel and tourism industry which saw a 13% decrease this year. We also operate in the education and training sector which saw 9% decrease from last year. In 2011 we extended our provision in the preparation for life and work sector by implementing functional skills qualifications. This sector has seen the largest number of achievements (over 2.5 million) despite the slight decrease (7%) this year, representing 30% of all achievements. Of the 20 qualifications with the most achievements, eight of them are from this sector subject area. There were just over 1 million achievements in functional skills in this sector, representing 41% of all achievements in this sector subject area. In 2013 we expanded in the health, public services and care sector with the Level 2 Award in Emergency First Aid at Work (QCF). This is the third largest and fastest-growing sector. This is mainly due to an increase in first aid at work qualifications in order to comply with the Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations In 2014 we expanded in the agriculture, horticulture and animal care sector with our suite of horseracing qualifications. Although, this is one of the smallest sectors in achievements, achievement levels appear to be somewhat consistent across years with minor change in figures (5% increase this year). Social sciences, language, literature and culture, and construction, planning and the built environment were the fastest growing sectors. This was largely due to an increase in achievements in Cambridge International Level 1/Level 2 Certificate in First Language English. Over the past five years, health, public services and care has seen the highest increase (50%) in learner achievements. Trends in achievements in qualifications other than GCSE and A level in each sector subject area by academic year ( ) Sector subject area 2010/ / / / /15 % change (2013/ /15) 01 - Health, Public Services and Care 793, ,400 1,025,200 1,183,300 1,188, % 02 - Science and Mathematics 167, , , , ,900-7% 03 - Agriculture, Horticulture and Animal Care 120, , , , ,700 5% 04 - Engineering and Manufacturing Technologies 422, , , , , % 05 - Construction, Planning and the Built Environment 214, , , , ,700 19% 06 - Information and Communication Technology 610, , , , ,700-19% 07 - Retail and Commercial Enterprise 693, , , , ,300-10% 08 - Leisure, Travel and Tourism 489, , , , ,000-13% 09 - Arts, Media and Publishing 785, , , , ,900-6% 10 - History, Philosophy and Theology 45,600 46,600 41,400 33,300 31,000-7% 11 - Social Sciences 4,500 4,200 4,700 6,400 9,600 50% 12 - Languages, Literature and Culture 390, , , , ,400 27% 13 - Education and Training 107,400 96, ,500 99,700 90,300-9% 14 - Preparation for Life and Work 2,585,600 3,013,000 3,006,400 2,682,600 2,506,300-7% 15 - Business, Administration, Finance and Law 541, , , , ,700-19% Total 7,972,200 8,874,700 9,267,200 8,759,800 8,371,800-4% Table A1.1 Trends in achievements in other qualifications in each sector subject area (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) SAR 2015 Page 34 of 147

44 Learner achievements Learner achievements A1.1.4 Achievements in other qualifications by level Over the past five years, the total number of achievements in qualifications other than GCSE, AS and A level has increased overall from 8 million to 8.4 million. This period has also seen large increases in the number of qualifications designed to meet the QCF requirements, in parallel with big reductions in the qualification types that they typically replaced. However, there has been a 4% decrease in the total number of achievements in other qualifications compared to the previous year (from 8.8 million to 8.4 million). This is likely to be due to changes in funding and the accountability framework that reduced the number of vocational qualifications recognised in schools for performance table purposes. 9,500,000 9,000,000 8,500,000 8,000,000 7,500,000 7,000,000 Trends in total number of achievements recorded in qualifications other than GCSE, AS and A level across all levels ( ) 9,3 8,9 8,8 8,4 8,0 2010/ / / / /15 Academic Year Chart A1.2 Trends in total number of achievements in 'other' qualifications across all levels (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) Qualifications other than GCSE, AS and A level in England, Wales and Northern Ireland are grouped into levels, from Entry level (1 to 3) to Level 8. Level 2 qualification achievements (excluding Level 1/Level 2 qualifications) account for 37% of all achievements in other qualifications in 2014/15. The number of achievements in Level 1/Level 2 qualifications (including qualifications known as Level 1/Level 2 Certificates or IGCSEs, which are taken as an alternative to GCSEs), increased by nearly 105% compared to the previous year. Trends in achievements recorded in qualifications other than GCSE, AS and A level by level ( ) 5,000,000 4,500,000 4,000,000 3,500,000 3,000,000 2,500,000 2,000,000 1,500,000 1,000, ,000 0 Entry Level Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 1/2 Level 4-8 Chart A1.3 Trends in achievements in 'other' qualifications by level and academic year (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) 2010/ / / / /15 SAR 2015 Page 35 of 147

45 A1.1.5 Achievements in other qualifications by qualification type There has been a 4% decrease in the total number of achievements in other qualifications compared to the previous year; eleven of the 16 qualification types saw a decrease. The largest increase in achievements was in other general qualifications (35%, 943,400 to 1,274,700). This is mainly due to previously mentioned large increases in achievements in Level 1/Level 2. Functional skills qualifications have replaced basic skills and key skills qualifications leading to a decrease in achievements in these qualifications. Vocationally-related qualifications saw a large decrease (74%, from 179,700 to 47,100) as have national vocational qualifications (65% from 7,800 to 2,700). This is due to the development and increased uptake of other alternative qualification types. Other than the QCF type, which covers a wide range of different types of qualifications, this year other general qualifications has surpassed functional skills as the largest qualification type in achievements. 1st4sport qualifications trends in terms of achievements within the five types of qualifications we award are similar to the market trends highlighted in table A1.2. Trends in achievements in qualifications other than GCSE and A level by type of qualification by academic year ( ) Qualification type 2010/ / / / /2015 % change (2013/ /15) Advanced Extension Award % Basic Skills 611, , ,770 4, % Diploma 9,232 10,853 2,771 0~ 0 0% English for Speakers of Other Languages 273, , , , ,300-24% Entry Level 160, , ,544 88,800 75,000-16% Free Standing Mathematics Qualification 25,486 22,941 23,143 35,800 37,300 4% Functional Skills 566, , ,599 1,075,800 1,034,800-4% Higher Level 30,292 16,827 7,583 5,200 9,000 73% Key Skills 618, , , ,800 99,900-19% National Vocational Qualification 587, ,844 28,740 7,800 2,700-65% Occupational Qualification 17,478 4, ~ -100% Other General Qualification 767, , , ,400 1,274,700 35% Principal Learning 17,067 17,217 5,167 2,000 1,500-25% Project 50,461 49,757 43,935 52,900 43,800-17% QCF 2,836,220 5,283,347 6,235,824 5,884,300 5,473,100-7% Vocationally-Related Qualification 1,399, , , ,700 47,100-74% Total 7,972,228 8,874,749 9,267,240 8,759,800 8,371,800-4% Table A1.2 Trends in other qualification achievements by qualification type (Ofqual's RQAD and JCQ data) SAR 2015 Page 36 of 147

46 A1.1.6 Distribution of recorded achievements In 2014/15, relatively few non GCSE, AS, and A level qualifications had large numbers of recorded achievements. CIEH Level 2 Award in Food Safety in Catering (QCF) and Cambridge International Level 1/Level 2 Certificate in First Language English were the two qualifications that had learner achievements higher than 100,000. The CIEH qualification has consistently been the qualification with the most achievements in qualifications other than GCSE, AS, and A level in recent years. There were over 23,000 qualifications other than GCSE, AS, and A level; 58% of these recorded achievements. Only 10% (2,220 qualifications) had more than 500 recorded achievements. Trends in the number of qualifications other than GCSE & A level by number of achievements in 2014/15 Number of achievements Number of qualifications (2010/2011) Number of qualifications (2012/2013) Number of qualifications (2013/2014) Number of qualifications (2014/2015) Proportion (%) (2014/2015) More than 100, % 50,000-99, % 10,000-49, % 5,000-9, % 1,000-4, ,098 1,087 1,077 5% % ,055 1,143 5% ,323 1,583 1,601 1,825 8% ,154 1,303 1,399 1,588 7% ,337 2,943 3,222 3,632 16% 1-9 1,737 2,783 2,886 3,056 13% Zero 8,886 10,628 11,446 9,819 42% Total 18,287 22,489 23,851 23, % Table A1.3 Comparisons of number of other qualifications and number of achievements (Ofqual's RQAD and JCQ data) A high proportion of achievements are concentrated in relatively few qualifications; 2% (238 qualifications) accounted for half of the number of achievements recorded in other qualifications. Cumulative number of qualifications (other than GCSE & A level) accounting for percentages of total achievements in 2014/15 Percentage of achievements Number of qualifications with achievements Proportion of qualifications with achievements (%) 25% % 50% 238 2% 75% 927 7% 90% 2,398 18% 100% 13, % Table A1.4 Other qualifications accounting for percentages of total achievements (Ofqual's RQAD and JCQ data) SAR 2015 Page 37 of 147

47 Ofqual recognised organisations A1.2 Supply of regulated qualifications Awarding organisations are required to complete Ofqual s recognition procedure to be eligible to offer regulated qualifications. Since July 2011, new awarding organisations are required to comply with Ofqual s Criteria for Recognition; once recognised they must ongoing with Ofqual s General Conditions of Recognition. The number of recognised awarding organisations in 2014/15 has decreased by 2% from the previous year (from 166 to 163). This was due to organisations re-structuring, merging with other recognised organisations or ceasing to offer qualifications. Trends in the number of Ofqual recognised organisations ( ) / / / / / / / / / / / /2015 Chart A1.4 Total number of awarding organisations recognised to deliver regulated qualifications on 30 September in each year (Ofqual) A1.2.1 Market share of awarding organisations Academic Year The majority of the organisations listed in the 25 top awarding organisations in terms of achievements reported a decrease in the number of achievements in 2013/14 compared to the previous year. Pearson recorded over one-fifth of all achievements in 2014/15. The largest ten organisations, by number of achievements, account for 68% of all recorded achievements. 1st4sport is now ranked on the 21st position (from 25 last year) amongst 163 recognised awarding organisations who recorded achievements in 2014/15 academic year in other qualifications across all sectors. 1st4sport is also the second largest awarding organisation in leisure, travel and tourism sector, with 14% of total achievements in this sector. This is mainly due to our high demand (23,155 learner achievements) for our Level 1 Award in Coaching Football (QCF), which is listed in the top 50 qualifications with the most achievements across all regulated qualifications (46th position). SAR 2015 Page 38 of 147

48 The 25 largest awarding organisations across all sectors in terms of achievements in other qualifications in England, Wales & Northern Ireland (2014/2015) Awarding Organisation Number of achievements Market share Competitive position Pearson Education Ltd 1,722, % 1 City and Guilds of London Institute 1,330, % 2 OCR 601, % 3 Cambridge English Language Assessment 297, % 4 Cambridge International Examinations 280, % 5 Chartered Institute of Environmental Health 279, % 6 Highfield Awarding Body for Compliance 272, % 7 NCFE 270, % 8 AQA Education 255, % 9 Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music 255, % 10 WJEC-CBAC 195, % 11 Trinity College London 181, % 12 Qualsafe Awards 148, % 13 BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT 107, % 14 NOCN 96, % 15 First Aid Awards Ltd 90, % 16 Excellence, Achievement & Learning Limited 88, % 17 Cskills Awards 70, % 18 Imperial Society of Teachers of Dancing 69, % 19 Council for Awards in Care, Health and Education 65, % 20 1st4sport Qualifications 59, % 21 BIIAB 58, % 22 Ascentis 54, % 23 Sports Leaders UK 53, % 24 Open College Network Eastern Region trading as Gateway Qualifications 48, % 25 Table A1.5 The 25 largest awarding organisations in terms of achievements in all qualifications across sectors in England, Wales and Northern Ireland (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database and JCQ) SAR 2015 Page 39 of 147

49 1st4sport Level 1 Award in Coaching Football (QCF) is listed in the top 50 qualifications with the most achievements across all regulated qualifications (46th position). The 50 qualifications with the most achievements in all regulated qualifications in England, Wales & Northern Ireland (2014/2015) Qualification Title Qualification Type Number of achievements Cambridge International Level 1/Level 2 Certificate in First Language English Other General Qualification 215,870 CIEH Level 2 Award in Food Safety in Catering (QCF) QCF 136,535 QA Level 2 Award in Emergency First Aid at Work (QCF) QCF 79,650 City & Guilds Functional Skills qualification in English at Level 2 Functional Skills 78,375 City & Guilds Functional Skills qualification in English at Level 1 Functional Skills 75,175 City & Guilds Functional Skills qualification in Mathematics at Level 1 Functional Skills 73,765 Pearson Edexcel Functional Skills qualification in Mathematics at Level 1 Functional Skills 73,345 OCR Level 1/2 Cambridge National Certificate in ICT Other General Qualification 65,390 City & Guilds Level 2 Award in Functional Skills Mathematics Functional Skills 64,355 ABRSM Level 1 Award in Graded Examination in Music Performance (Grade 1) (QCF) QCF 61,135 Pearson Edexcel Functional Skills qualification in English at Level 1 Functional Skills 57,945 HABC Level 2 Award in Emergency First Aid at Work (QCF) QCF 57,380 FAA Level 2 Award in Emergency First Aid at Work (QCF) QCF 56,120 Cambridge English Level 1 Certificate in English (IELTS ) (ESOL) English for Speakers of Other Languages 55,155 BCS Level 2 ECDL Certificate in IT Application Skills QCF 55,130 Pearson Edexcel Functional Skills qualification in English at Level 2 Functional Skills 50,930 Pearson Edexcel Functional Skills qualification in Mathematics at Level 2 Functional Skills 49,905 Pearson BTEC Level 1/Level 2 First Award in Sport Other General Qualification 49,480 Pearson BTEC Level 1/Level 2 First Award in Principles of Applied Science Other General Qualification 48,170 Pearson Edexcel Level 1/Level 2 Certificate in English Literature Other General Qualification 43,300 ABRSM Level 1 Award in Graded Examination in Music Performance (Grade 2) (QCF) QCF 42,735 AQA Level 1/2 Certificate in English Literature Other General Qualification 37,895 TCL Entry Level Certificate in ESOL International - Speaking and Listening (Entry 3) English for Speakers of Other Languages 37,345 City & Guilds Functional Skills qualification in mathematics at Entry 3 Functional Skills 35,990 HABC Level 2 Award in Food Safety in Catering (QCF) QCF 35,520 SAR 2015 Page 40 of 147

50 Qualification Title Qualification Type Number of achievements ABRSM Level 1 Award in Graded Examination in Music Performance (Grade 3) (QCF) QCF 35,490 BIIAB Level 2 Award for Personal Licence Holders (QCF) QCF 34,760 Pearson BTEC Level 1/Level 2 First Award in Application of Science Other General Qualification 34,395 CIEH Level 2 Award in Health and Safety in the Workplace (QCF) QCF 34,310 QA Level 3 Award in First Aid at Work (QCF) QCF 32,920 Sports Leaders UK Level 1 Award in Sports Leadership (QCF) QCF 31,675 City & Guilds Functional Skills qualification in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) at Level 2 Functional Skills 29,770 CIEH Level 2 Award in Emergency First Aid at Work (QCF) QCF 29,585 English for Speakers of Other Cambridge English Level 2 Certificate in English (IELTS ) (ESOL) Languages 28,870 Pearson BTEC Level 1/Level 2 First Award in Business Other General Qualification 28,725 Pearson Edexcel Functional Skills qualification in Mathematics at Entry 3 Functional Skills 28,495 ABRSM Level 2 Certificate in Graded Examination in Music Performance (Grade 4) (QCF) QCF 26,750 Pearson BTEC Level 1/Level 2 First Award in Information and Creative Technology Other General Qualification 26,490 AQA Level 3 Extended Project Project 26,125 AQA Level 2 Certificate in Further Mathematics Other General Qualification 25,575 Pearson Edexcel Functional Skills qualification in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) at Level 2 Functional Skills 25,465 City & Guilds Functional Skills qualification in English at Entry 3 Functional Skills 25,390 IQL Level 2 Award in Pool Lifeguarding, Intervention, Supervision and Rescue (QCF) QCF 24,285 AQA Level 1/2 Certificate in English Language Other General Qualification 24,140 ABRSM Level 2 Certificate in Graded Examination in Music Performance (Grade 5) (QCF) QCF 23,785 1st4sport Level 1 Award in Coaching Football (QCF) QCF 23,155 City & Guilds Functional Skills qualification in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) at Level 1 Functional Skills 22,500 Cambridge International Level 1/Level 2 Certificate in Literature (English) Other General Qualification 21,940 English for Speakers of Other Cambridge English Entry Level Certificate in English (IELTS ) (Entry 3) (ESOL) Languages 21,605 WJEC Level 2 Essential Skills Wales in Application of Number Other General Qualification 20,845 Table A1.6 The 50 high volume qualifications with the most achievements in all regulated qualifications in England, Wales & Northern Ireland (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) SAR 2015 Page 41 of 147

51 Regulated qualifications A1.2.2 Total number of regulated qualifications available The number of available qualifications in 2014/15 decreased slightly (2%) to 24,520 from 24,965 available qualifications in 2013/14. Overall, the number of available qualifications has increased by 36% since 2010/11 (from 18,095 to 24,520). This increase is likely to have been due to the re-development of existing qualifications as a result of QCF policy and GQ reform, rather than the introduction of new qualifications. 30,000 25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 Trends in the number of available regulated qualifications by academic year ( ) 23,642 24,965 24,520 20,500 18,095 15,297 11, / / / / / / /15 Academic year Chart A1.5 Total number of available regulated qualifications (Ofqual's RQAD and JCQ data) A1.2.3 Largest awarding organisations in terms of achievements in each sector skills area The distribution of achievements in 2014/15 in qualifications other than GCSE, AS and A level across the largest five awarding organisations by sector subject area is shown in table A1.5. Although there are 163 awarding organisations providing regulated qualifications, most of them provide qualifications in only a small number of sector subject areas. 1st4sport is the second largest awarding organisation in the leisure, travel and tourism sector, with 14% of total achievements in this sector. In each sector subject area, the three largest awarding organisations by number of achievements account for more than 50% of achievements (except in health, public services and care where it is 45%). The three largest awarding organisations by numbers of achievements account for more than 80% of achievements recorded in six sector subject areas. SAR 2015 Page 42 of 147

52 The 5 largest awarding organisations in terms of the highest volume achievements in each sector subject area in 2014/15 Sector subject area Awarding organisation Achievements (2014/15) % of achievements % change (2013/ /15) 01 - Health, public services and care 02 - Science and Mathematics 03 - Agriculture, horticulture and animal care 04 - Engineering and manufacturing technologies 05 - Construction, planning and the built environment 06 - Information and communication technology 07 - Retail and commercial enterprise Pearson Education Ltd 239,700 20% -17% Highfield Awarding Body for Compliance 155,700 13% -3% Qualsafe Awards 140,800 12% 17% NCFE 123,900 10% -2% City and Guilds of London Institute 89,400 8% -6% Pearson Education Ltd 174,700 58% -15% AQA Education 84,500 28% 21% OCR 26,400 9% -21% Cambridge International Examinations 12,200 4% 5% WJEC-CBAC 4,400 1% 11% City and Guilds of London Institute 72,900 62% 7% Pearson Education Ltd 15,400 13% -5% Equestrian Qualifications Limited 8,800 8% -10% Royal Horticultural Society 4,100 3% 35% Open College Network Northern Ireland 2,600 2% 2600% Chartered Institute of Environmental Health 86,000 21% -8% City and Guilds of London Institute 62,600 16% -3% Pearson Education Ltd 62,000 15% -7% Excellence, Achievement & Learning Limited 60,200 15% -10% IMI Awards Ltd 45,900 11% 3% City and Guilds of London Institute 111,000 40% 13% Cskills Awards 70,200 25% -4% Pearson Education Ltd 38,700 14% 8% British Safety Council 20,000 7% 1125% Excellence, Achievement & Learning Limited 9,400 3% 42% OCR 136,200 33% -40% BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT 105,700 25% -20% Pearson Education Ltd 105,400 25% 32% City and Guilds of London Institute 31,500 8% -14% The Learning Machine 18,700 5% 31% City and Guilds of London Institute 159,900 26% -16% Chartered Institute of Environmental Health 150,100 24% -11% Pearson Education Ltd 85,700 14% -25% Highfield Awarding Body for Compliance 57,100 9% 3% BIIAB 52,100 8% 0% SAR 2015 Page 43 of 147

53 Sector subject area Awarding organisation Achievements (2013/14) % of achievements % change (2013/ /15) 08 - Leisure, travel and tourism 09 - Arts, media and publishing 10 - History, philosophy and theology Pearson Education Ltd 145,400 35% -15% 1st4sport Qualifications 57,500 14% 3% Sports Leaders UK 53,500 13% -34% Active IQ 41,900 10% 30% Institute of Qualified Lifeguards 32,200 7% 7% Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music 255,100 31% -5% Pearson Education Ltd 148,800 18% -21% Trinity College London 102,300 12% 5% Imperial Society of Teachers of Dancing 69,200 8% 17% LAMDA 44,200 5% -32% NOCN 10,500 34% -41% Cambridge International Examinations 7,500 24% 53% Pearson Education Ltd 4,800 15% 52% OCR 4,300 14% 44% AQA Education 2,800 9% 3% 11 - Social sciences Cambridge International Examinations 4,100 43% 25% AQA Education 3,400 35% 40% WJEC-CBAC 1,000 10% 1000% Pearson Education Ltd 700 8% 98% OCR 200 2% 14% 12 - Languages, literature and culture 13 - Education and training 14 - Preparation for life and work 15 - Business, administration, finance and law Cambridge International Examinations 251,900 42% 79% Cambridge English Language Assessment 146,500 24% -8% AQA Education 93,500 15% 110% Pearson Education Ltd 58,300 10% 38% OCR 21,700 4% -26% City and Guilds of London Institute 26,500 29% -13% Council for Awards in Care, Health and Education 12,700 14% -7% Pearson Education Ltd 12,600 14% -28% OCR 8,900 10% -16% Cambridge English Language Assessment 5,200 6% 4% City and Guilds of London Institute 695,400 28% -1% Pearson Education Ltd 621,800 25% -15% OCR 193,900 8% -16% WJEC-CBAC 193,800 8% -21% Cambridge English Language Assessment 145,600 6% 397% Pearson Education Ltd 185,500 33% -28% City and Guilds of London Institute 62,700 11% -13% OCR 50,800 9% -25% Association of Accounting Technicians 41,400 7% 7% Institute of Leadership & Management 38,100 7% -4% Table A1.7 The 5 largest awarding organisations in terms of achievements in each sector (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) SAR 2015 Page 44 of 147

54 A1.2.4 Number of regulated qualifications by qualification type Qualifications are divided into different types. Table A1.8 shows the number of available qualifications to certificate for each type, and table A1.9 shows the number of achievements recorded for each type. The types of qualifications that we award are highlighted in both tables. The largest increase is seen in AS and A level qualifications (22% and 20% respectively) due to the development of new, reformed qualifications. An increase was also seen in the numbers of qualifications developed to meet the design requirements of the QCF (7%, to 20,771). A number of areas saw large decreases, namely diploma, occupational qualifications, principal learning, national vocational qualifications, basic skills, higher level, vocationally-related qualifications, key skills and entry level qualifications. These decreases are mainly due to the withdrawal or replacement of qualifications. Trends in the regulated qualifications of each type which were available to certificate by academic year ( ) Qualification type 2010/ / / / /15 % change (2013/ /15) Advanced Extension Award % Basic Skills % Diploma % English for Speakers of Other Languages % Entry Level % Free Standing Mathematics Qualification % Functional Skills % GCE A Level % GCE AS Level % GCSE % Higher Level % Key Skills % National Vocational Qualification 1,606 1,422 1, % Occupational Qualification % Other General Qualification % Principal Learning % Project % QCF 9,695 12,764 16,770 19,474 20,771 7% Vocationally-Related Qualification 2,395 2,105 1,654 1, % Total 18,095 20,500 23,642 24,965 24,520-2% Table A1.8 Number of available regulated qualifications by qualification type (Ofqual's RQAD and JCQ data) SAR 2015 Page 45 of 147

55 Achievements were recorded in more than 14,000 qualifications in 2014/15. This corresponds to 59% of available qualifications; 6% higher than in the previous year. Qualifications developed to meet the design requirements of the QCF accounted for 84% of qualifications with recorded achievements. Trends in the regulated qualifications of each type for which achievements were recorded by academic year ( ) Qualification type 2013/ /15 % Change (2013/ /15) Advanced Extension Award 1 1 0% Basic Skills % Diploma % English for Speakers of Other Languages % Entry Level % Free Standing Mathematics Qualification % Functional Skills % GCE A Level % GCE AS Level % GCSE % Higher Level % Key Skills % National Vocational Qualification % Occupational Qualification % Other General Qualification % Principal Learning % Project % QCF 10,604 12,097 14% Vocationally-Related Qualification % Total 13,323 14,413 8% Table A1.9 Qualification types with achievements, rounded to the nearest 50 (Ofqual's RQAD and JCQ data) SAR 2015 Page 46 of 147

56 A1.2.5 Awarding organisation operations by sector subject area Business, administration, finance and law had the largest number of awarding organisations with achievements (79). Preparation for life and work, which is the largest sector subject area by achievements, had 54 awarding organisations with achievements. The sector subject areas 1st4sport operate in are highlighted in the table below. Trends of awarding organisations operations in each sector subject area in other qualifications (2014/2015) Sector Subject Area Number of achievements Number of AOs Number of AOs with achievements 01 - Health, public services and care 1,188, Science and mathematics 302, Agriculture, horticulture and animal care 116, Engineering and manufacturing technologies 400, Construction, planning and the built environment 275, Information and communication technology 414, Retail and commercial enterprise 621, Leisure, travel and tourism 416, Arts, media and publishing 829, History, philosophy and theology 31, Social sciences 9, Languages, literature and culture 604, Education and training 90, Preparation for life and work 2,506, Business, administration, finance and law 563, Table A1.10 Awarding organisations trends in operations in each sector subject area (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) SAR 2015 Page 47 of 147

57 Learner achievements A1.2.6 Achievements in the QCF by level of qualification Trends in the number of achievements for QCF qualifications in 2014/2015 show a decrease in qualifications at level 1 and level 2 (8% and 16% respectively). Achievements for qualifications at entry level show a 21% increase. 3,500,000 3,000,000 2,500,000 2,000,000 1,500,000 1,000, ,000 0 Chart A1.6 Number of achievements in the QCF by qualification level and academic year (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) Learner achievements for 1st4sport qualifications in 2015 accounted for 0.1% at entry level, 60% at level 1, 33% at level 2, 6.9% at level 3 and 0.03% at level 4 qualifications. A1.2.7 Achievements in the QCF by size of qualification Trends in QCF achievements by qualification level ( ) Entry Level Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4-8 Qualifications that implement the QCF design specifications are made up of units. Each unit has a credit value which indicates how many credits are awarded when a unit is completed. Units contribute to the structure of each qualification. There are three different types of qualification in the QCF: award, certificate and diploma. An award can be achieved with 1 to 12 credits; a certificate with 13 to 36 credits and a diploma at least 37 credits. Achievements in qualifications by QCF size (2014/15) Certificate 26% Diploma 20% Chart A1.7 Percentage of qualification achievements in the QCF by qualification size (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) 2009/ / / / / /15 1st4sport trends are not too dissimilar to the market trends in terms of the distribution of learner achievements across the qualification sizes. Our learner achievements accounted for 68% award, 30% certificate and 2% diploma. Award 54% Award Certificate Diploma SAR 2015 Page 48 of 147

58 A1.2.8 High volume qualifications in the QCF in terms of achievements 1st4sport Level 1 Award in Coaching Football (QCF) is listed in the top 20 qualifications in the QCF with the most achievements (18th position); all except two of these 20 qualifications are at either Level 1 or 2. The top 20 QCF qualifications with the most achievements in England, Wales & Northern Ireland (2014/2015) Qualification Title Qualification Type Number of achievements CIEH Level 2 Award in Food Safety in Catering (QCF) QCF 136,535 QA Level 2 Award in Emergency First Aid at Work (QCF) QCF 79,650 ABRSM Level 1 Award in Graded Examination in Music Performance (Grade 1) (QCF) QCF 61,135 HABC Level 2 Award in Emergency First Aid at Work (QCF) QCF 57,380 FAA Level 2 Award in Emergency First Aid at Work (QCF) QCF 56,120 BCS Level 2 ECDL Certificate in IT Application Skills QCF 55,130 ABRSM Level 1 Award in Graded Examination in Music Performance (Grade 2) (QCF) QCF 42,735 HABC Level 2 Award in Food Safety in Catering (QCF) QCF 35,520 ABRSM Level 1 Award in Graded Examination in Music Performance (Grade 3) (QCF) QCF 35,490 BIIAB Level 2 Award for Personal Licence Holders (QCF) QCF 34,760 CIEH Level 2 Award in Health and Safety in the Workplace (QCF) QCF 34,310 QA Level 3 Award in First Aid at Work (QCF) QCF 32,920 Sports Leaders UK Level 1 Award in Sports Leadership (QCF) QCF 31,675 CIEH Level 2 Award in Emergency First Aid at Work (QCF) QCF 29,585 ABRSM Level 2 Certificate in Graded Examination in Music Performance (Grade 4) (QCF) QCF 26,750 IQL Level 2 Award in Pool Lifeguarding, Intervention, Supervision and Rescue (QCF) QCF 24,285 ABRSM Level 2 Certificate in Graded Examination in Music Performance (Grade 5) (QCF) QCF 23,785 1st4sport Level 1 Award in Coaching Football (QCF) QCF 23,155 QA Level 3 Award in Paediatric First Aid (QCF) QCF 20,615 TQUK Level 2 Award in Emergency First Aid at Work (QCF) QCF 20,200 Table A1.11 Highest volume QCF qualifications in England, Wales & Northern Ireland (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) SAR 2015 Page 49 of 147

59 Learner achievements A1.2.9 Awarding organisations market share - functional skills qualifications Functional skills qualifications assess the practical skills that allow people to use English, mathematics, and information and communication technology (ICT) in real-life contexts, and are currently mandatory components in apprenticeship frameworks. There are 17 awarding organisations (decreased from 22 last year), including 1st4sport, which recorded achievements in functional skills in 2014/15. Pearson and City & Guilds awarded 84% of all functional skills achievements. The top 10 largest functional skills awarding organisations in terms of achievements (2014/15) 500, , , , , , , , , , ,000 50,000 69,105 34,410 19,105 13,375 11,335 9,880 4,915 4,350 8,185 0 City and Guilds of London Institute Pearson Education Ltd OCR AQA Education NCFE Skillsfirst Awards Ltd EAL NOCN Scottish Industry Qualifications Qualifications Authority trading as SQA Others Chart A1.8 Achievements in functional skills qualifications across the 7 largest AOs (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) SAR 2015 Page 50 of 147

60 A High volume functional skills qualifications in terms of achievements 1st4sport qualifications only recorded a small number of achievements for functional skills qualifications (70 achievements across all four qualifications that we award), hence we do not appear on the list with the top 20 highest volume qualifications. All except four of these 20 qualifications are at either Level 1 or 2. The top 20 functional skills qualifications with the most achievements in England, Wales & Northern Ireland (2014/2015) Qualification Title Qualification Type Number of achievements City & Guilds Functional Skills qualification in English at Level 2 Functional Skills 78,375 City & Guilds Functional Skills qualification in English at Level 1 Functional Skills 75,175 City & Guilds Functional Skills qualification in Mathematics at Level 1 Functional Skills 73,765 Pearson Edexcel Functional Skills qualification in Mathematics at Level 1 Functional Skills 73,345 City & Guilds Level 2 Award in Functional Skills Mathematics Functional Skills 64,355 Pearson Edexcel Functional Skills qualification in English at Level 1 Functional Skills 57,945 Pearson Edexcel Functional Skills qualification in English at Level 2 Functional Skills 50,930 Pearson Edexcel Functional Skills qualification in Mathematics at Level 2 Functional Skills 49,905 City & Guilds Functional Skills qualification in mathematics at Entry 3 Functional Skills 35,990 City & Guilds Functional Skills qualification in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) at Level 2 Functional Skills 29,770 Pearson Edexcel Functional Skills qualification in Mathematics at Entry 3 Functional Skills 28,495 Pearson Edexcel Functional Skills qualification in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) at Level 2 Functional Skills 25,465 City & Guilds Functional Skills qualification in English at Entry 3 Functional Skills 25,390 City & Guilds Functional Skills qualification in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) at Level 1 Functional Skills 22,500 Pearson Edexcel Functional Skills qualification in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) at Level 1 Functional Skills 16,780 Pearson Edexcel Functional Skills Qualification in English at Entry 3 Functional Skills 16,375 Pearson EDI Functional Skills qualification in English at Level 1 Functional Skills 15,625 Pearson EDI Functional Skills qualification in mathematics at level 1 Functional Skills 13,360 Pearson EDI Functional Skills qualification in English at Level 2 Functional Skills 11,955 OCR Functional Skills qualification in English at level 1 Functional Skills 11,165 Table A1.12 Highest volume functional skills qualifications in England, Wales & Northern Ireland (Ofqual's Regulated Qualifications Activity Database) SAR 2015 Page 51 of 147

61 B SQA Accreditation Annual Review (2015/2016) This section focuses on the qualification market trends in Scotland, as presented within the SQA Accreditation Annual Review, with a focus on demand and supply of qualifications. For the purpose of this report only areas related to 1st4sport operations as an approved awarding body in the Scottish market are presented. 1st4sport qualifications operate within Area 007: Providing Goods and Services and offered one qualification in 2015 on the SCQF; the SVQ 3 in Leisure Management at SCQF Level 7. In 2015 there was an increase (from 2 to 4) in the number of events authorised for this qualification to be delivered by three 1st4sport recognised centres in Scotland. However, a slight decrease in both learner registrations (from 65 to 63) and certifications (from 68 to 57) was seen for the same qualification. B1.1 Demand for SQA accredited qualifications Data presented on the performance of SQA accredited qualifications (table B1.1) is collected from approved awarding bodies on a quarterly basis and covers the financial year 2015/16 for SVQ qualifications, regulatory and licensing qualifications and other qualifications. In 2015/16, registrations for SVQ qualifications increased marginally by 2%, while certifications decreased by 4%, which is the first decrease in annual registrations since 2011/12. The level of registrations for SVQs remain in line with the high levels seen in 2009/10 and 2010/11, which is a positive sign that business confidence remains and also that, although alternative competence-based qualifications are available, the SVQ is still the preferred qualification type for some sectors. Registrations for regulatory and licensing qualifications decreased significantly by 38% and certifications by 40%. However, this is a result of the compulsory Scottish Certificate for Personal Licence Holders (Refresher) at SCQF Level 6. Due to changes in legislation, all holders of the Personal Licence Holder qualifications who held the licence for five years were required to undertake the refresher qualification or latest accredited Scottish Certificate for Personal Licence Holders at SCQF level 6 in 2014/15. During 2015/16 the demand was more stable and returned the levels seen in 2013/14, with an increase of 3% in registrations and 4% in certifications. Registrations for other qualifications decreased by 1% and certifications by 3%. An increasing volume of other qualifications are being accredited year on year and, as a result, demand of these qualifications is also increasing. While SVQs remain as the Scottish Government s qualification of choice for inclusion in MA Frameworks, other accredited qualifications may be approved for inclusion where there is not an appropriate SVQ. As a result, an increasing number of Other qualifications are now included in MA Frameworks, which could go some way to explaining the growing annual uptake of these qualifications. SAR 2015 Page 52 of 147

62 Certificated learners Registered learners 160, , , ,000 80,000 60,000 40,000 20,000 0 Trends in learner registrations for SQA accredited qualifications ( ) 135, , ,672 81,089 92,243 66, Year Chart B1.1 Trends in the demand for SQA accredited qualifications number of learner registrations Trends in learner achievements for SQA accredited qualifications ( ) 120, ,000 80,000 60,000 40,000 20, ,812 86,665 86,559 71,097 61,506 54, Year Chart B1.2 Trends in the demand for SQA accredited qualifications number of learner achievements A slight decrease in both learner registrations (from 65 to 63) and certifications (from 68 to 57) was seen for the 1st4sport SVQ 3 in Leisure Management at SCQF Level 7. SAR 2015 Page 53 of 147

63 Certificated learners (in thousand) Registered learners (in thousand) Trends in learner registrations by type of qualifications ( ) SVQ qualifications Regulatory and licensing qualifications Other qualifications Chart B1.3 Learner registrations for SQA accredited qualifications by type of qualification Trends in learner achievements by type of qualification ( ) SVQ qualifications Regulatory and licensing qualifications Other qualifications Chart B1.4 Learner certifications for SQA accredited qualifications by type of qualification SAR 2015 Page 54 of 147

64 Approved awarding bodies B2.1 Supply of SQA accredited qualifications At the end of the operational year , there were 38 SQA Accreditation approved awarding bodies. One organisation (British Institute of Facilities Management - BIFM) gained SQA-approved awarding body status and 16 organisations contacted SQA Accreditation to explore the possibility of becoming an approved awarding body. Eight submitted formal requests through the enquiry process and two of those progressed to the approval stage. Two awarding bodies (Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development-CIPD and Education and Media Services Limited - ITEC) had their approved status withdrawn at their own request. The Institute of Revenues Rating and Valuation (IRRV), had its approval withdrawn by SQA Accreditation s Accreditation Coordination Group (ACG) as a result of the Zero Uptake Policy Trends in the number of awarding bodies approved by SQA Accreditation ( ) / / / / /16 Operational Year Chart B1.5 Trends in the number of approved awarding bodies approved by SQA Accreditation 1st4sport offered one qualification in 2015 on the SCQF; the SVQ 3 in Leisure Management at SCQF Level 7 and is ranked on the 30th position amongst 38 approved awarding organisations who recorded achievements in 2015/2016 for all qualifications in Scotland. The 38 approved awarding bodies by SQA Accreditation by market share ( ) Awarding body Number of achievements Market share Competitive position Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA) % 1 National Examination Board in Occupational Safety and Health (NEBOSH) % 2 British Institute of Innkeepers Awarding Body (BIIAB) % 3 Highfield Awarding Body for Compliance (HABC) % 4 City & Guilds % 5 ITC First % 6 First Aid Awards Ltd (FAA) % 7 Royal Academy of Dance (RAD) % 8 Excellence, Achievement & Learning Ltd (EAL) % 9 SAR 2015 Page 55 of 147

65 Awarding body Number of achievements Market share Competitive position IMI Awards Ltd % 10 Safety Training Awards (STA) % 11 Pearson Education Ltd % 12 Rockschool Ltd 796 1% 13 Safe Cert Awards Ltd 633 1% 14 Association of Chartered Certfied Accountants (ACCA) 509 1% 15 Chartered Management Institute (CMI) % 16 Vocational Training Charitable Trust (VTCT) % 17 Scottish Bakers % 18 Association of Accounting Technicians (AAT) % 19 Associated Sports Qualifications (ASQ) % 20 Engineering Construction Industry Training Board (ECITB) % 21 GQA Qualifications Ltd (GQA) % 22 Mineral Products Qualifications Council (MPQC) % 23 English Speaking Board (International) Ltd (ESB) % 24 The Prince's Trust % 25 Institute of Leadership and Management (ILM) % 26 PAA\VQ-SET % 27 Chartered Institute of Housing (CIH) % 28 Equestrian Qualifications GB Ltd (EQL) % 29 1st4sport Qualifications % 30 Industry Qualifications Ltd (IQ) % 31 Packaging Industry Awarding Body Company (PIABC) % 32 Worshipful Company of Spectacle Makers % 33 Alcohol Focus Scotland (AFS) % 34 Future (Awards and Qualifications) Ltd (FAQ) % 35 SFEDI Awards % 36 Lantra Awards % 37 British Institute of Facilites Management (BIFM) % 38 Table B1.1 List of the 38 awarding bodies approved by SQA accreditation by market share SAR 2015 Page 56 of 147

66 SQA accredited qualifications At the end of 2015/16, SQA Accreditation had a total of 993 accredited qualifications, with 84 qualifications being withdrawn. The common rationale for awarding bodies withdrawing SVQs was low or zero uptake and was a result of SQA Accreditation invoking the Zero Uptake Policy. In some instances, SVQs were replaced with alternative accredited competence-based qualifications. This has been driven in part by Modern Apprenticeship Frameworks where the SVQ has not been successful. In addition, a number of EDI qualifications were withdrawn as a result of EDI being subsumed within Pearson Education Ltd and duplicate qualifications having their accreditation removed. SQA Accreditation will continue to monitor these movements and identify, where possible, the reasons behind these changes. Trends in the number of SQA accredited qualifications by type ( ) SVQ qualifications Regulatory and Licensing qualifications Other qualifications 2012/ / / /16 Chart B1.6 Types of accredited qualifications in the Scottish market Types and distribution of accredited qualifications in Scotland (Qualifications that have lapsed are not included) ( ) Qualification Types Number of qualifications (2015/16) Percentage change (%) No. of ABs offering these qualifications Proportion (%) of all accredited qualifications Scottish Vocational Qualifications (SVQs) 657-8% 15 66% Regulatory and Licensing qualifications (R&L) 52 0% 13 5% Other qualifications 284 9% 28 29% Total 993-3% % Table B1.2 Distribution of accredited qualifications in the Scottish market SAR 2015 Page 57 of 147

67 SVQ accredited qualifications As in previous years, more SVQ levels 2 and 3 were accredited. This is a result of them being a mandatory qualification in Modern Apprenticeships. Of level 2 and 3 SVQs, 77% and 86% respectively are present in Modern Apprenticeships. Currently, 22 SVQ 4 qualifications and five SVQ 5 qualifications are part of Apprenticeship frameworks. These numbers may increase as more Technical and Professional Apprenticeships are approved. Trends in available SVQ accredited qualifications by qualification level ( ) Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level / / / /16 Table B1.6 Accredited SVQ qualifications by qualification level SAR 2015 Page 58 of 147

68 Accredited qualifcations Number of approved applications Appendix 2 1st4sport key performance statistics Key trends in 2015 show an increase in the demand of 1st4sport qualifications. A more detailed representation of figures and rationale is provided in the following charts Chart A2.1 Trends in the demand for qualifications number of new recognised centre and qualification approvals statuses granted Trends in the numbers of centre and qualification applications appear to be positive. The vast increases in qualification approval applications shown in were due to the shift to the QCF, and in 2014 due to the transfer of the BHEST centres to 1st4sport following the launch of the new suite of horseracing and farriery qualifications Trends in the number of new recognised centres and qualification approvals ( ) Chart A2.2 Trends in the supply of qualifications number of 1st4sport accredited qualifications Year Trends in the number of accredited qualifications ( ) 257 During 2015 a total of 18 new qualifications were developed and accredited, however this is not reflected in the overall increase as the life of some qualifications ended. In addition to this, development for 15 new qualifications has commenced in 2015 but not yet completed and accredited. It must be noted that in the total of 256 qualifications, pathways, disciplines and add-on modules are counted as separate qualifications to ensure consistency with our IT systems functionality and the associated audit trail maintained Applications granted Centre Recognition Applications granted Qualification Approval Year 256 SAR 2015 Page 59 of 147

69 Of the 256 available regulated 1st4sport qualifications 212 qualifications recorded learner achievements. Some of these qualifications with no achievements have become available towards the end of 2015 or were due to expire, and for others the length of course for completion may take 2 or 3 years. The following charts illustrate the supply of our qualifications and respective demand/learner take up. Distribution of 1st4sport accredited qualifications by qualification level (2015) Distribution of learner achievements across 1st4sport qualifications by level (2015) Level 3 36% Level 4 1% Entry Level 2% Level 1 19% Level 2 32% Entry Level Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Chart A2.3 1st4sport qualifications offered and qualifications achieved by learners across levels Trends in the qualifications market show that the largest number of achievements for qualifications on the QCF were at level 2 (45%). Achievements at both level 1 and level 3 account for 22%, followed by entry level (10%) and level 4-8 (2%). Level 2 33% Level 3 6.9% Level % Entry Level 0.1% Level 1 60% Entry Level Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Distribution of 1st4sport accredited qualifications by QCF size (2015) Distribution of learner achievements across 1st4sport qualifications by QCF size (2015) Diploma 12% Award Diploma 2% Award Certificate 48% Award 40% Certificate Diploma Certificate 30% Award 68% Certificate Diploma Chart A2.4 1st4sport qualifications offered and qualifications achieved by learners in terms of QCF size There are five 1st4sport qualifications (functional skills, SVQ) which account for 2% of qualifications of no size in terms of QCF size. The largest number of achievements in the qualifications market was recorded against awards (54%), followed by certificates (26%) and diplomas (20%). SAR 2015 Page 60 of 147

70 Registered Learners Events authorised The slight decrease in the number of available regulated 1st4sport qualifications is not in line with the trends of the respective demand saw the largest increase in the demand since many years, contrary to the market trends (as presented in the Ofqual and SQA Accreditation qualification market reports). This data should be treated with care as the life of some qualifications ended during ,000 6,000 5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0 Trends in the number of event authorisations ( ) 5,124 5,089 5,252 5,333 5,300 5,948 4,269 4,583 4,799 3, Year Chart A2.5 Trends in the demand for qualifications number of event authorisations 2015 saw the largest number of events (5,948) ever being authorised to be delivered by 1st4sport recognised centres, an increase of 0.12%. After many years 2015 saw a large increase in both the number of learner registrations (6%) and learner certifications (5%), contrary to the market trends. 100,000 90,000 80,000 70,000 60,000 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 0 Trends in learner registrations for 1st4sport qualifications ( ) 76,193 74,330 73,122 73,158 73,438 57,417 58,980 58,339 65,866 69, Year Chart A2.6 Trends in the demand for 1st4sport qualifications number of registered learners SAR 2015 Page 61 of 147

71 Registered learmers Learners certificated 80,000 70,000 60,000 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 0 Trends in learner certifications for 1st4sport qualifications ( ) 63,798 62,856 64,754 64,069 53,501 61,510 57,198 59,789 44,540 44, Year Chart A2.7 Trends in the demand for 1st4sport qualifications number of learner achievements/certifications The increase in our learner achievements in 2015 is not in line with the decreased trends in the qualifications market. When reviewing learner certification figures several factors should be taken into consideration that may affect the accuracy of data, such as the time at which the data is exported from the system and also the length of some qualifications, which might be spread over two or three years. Trends in participation by gender (1st4sport registered learners ) 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 87% 85% 83% 82% 83% 83% 82% 79% 13% 15% 17% 18% 17% 17% 18% 21% Registered male learners Registered female learners Year Chart A2.8 Trends in learner participation by gender SAR 2015 Page 62 of 147

72 Registered learners Registered learners 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% Participation by age (1st4sport registered learners ) 40% 33% 20% 6% 1% Age Age Age Age Age 50 or over Age group Chart A2.9 Trends in learner participation by age 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 86% Participation by ethnicity (1st4sport registered learners ) 5% 2% 2% 2% 1% 1% 1% White British White Black Mixed Background Asian Asian British Black British Other Ethnicity Chart A2.10 Trends in learner participation by ethnicity SAR 2015 Page 63 of 147

73 Number of requests Registered learners 50% 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% 45% 13% 11% Disability types in participation (1st4sport registered learners ) 6% 6% 4% 4% 3% 3% 3% 1% 1% 0.2% 0.1% Chart A2.11 Disability types of learners There were 968 cases of disability confirmed at the stage of learner registration across 69,894 registered learners in This accounts for less than 1% of the total registered learners Trends in the number of requests for reasonable adjustments ( ) Year Chart A2.12 Trends in reasonable adjustment requests The reasonable adjustment requests were related to 27 qualifications. Of the 113 requests only 5 have been declined (4%); this was mainly due to learners inability and/or lack of evidence to meet the eligibility criteria. It is interesting to note that out of 968 reported disabilities only 113 requests for reasonable adjustments were submitted. SAR 2015 Page 64 of 147

74 Number of incidents Number of requests Chart A2.13 Trends in special consideration requests Trends in the number of requests for special consideration ( ) The special consideration requests were related to 28 qualifications. However, 31 of 135 special consideration requests (23%) were not granted. This was mostly due to invalid rationale provided and/or lack of associated evidence to support learner s eligibility for special consideration. Year Trends in the number of incidents ( ) Year Chart A2.14 Trends in the number of incidents managed Incident types may include a sanction against a centre reported by an EV, learner appeal against the outcomes of their assessment by their centre, learner complaint against their centre, suspected learner misconduct, suspected non- by a centre, suspected child or vulnerable adult safeguarding issue by a centre, customer service complaint to 1st4sport from a centre, customer service complaint to 1st4sport from a learner, suspected non- by 1st4sport, suspected child or vulnerable adult safeguarding issue by 1st4sport, centre appeal against a 1st4sport procedural decision or learner appeal against a 1st4sport procedural decision. SAR 2015 Page 65 of 147

75 Appendix 3 Strategic direction achievement rates A3.1 Strategic direction achievement results The overall strategic direction achievement rate for 2015 appears to be positive (82%). Supporting evidence (SDPL) is provided on specific targets to provide the rationale for the associated performance levels. Strategic Direction (2015) Critical Success Factors Strategic aim Strategic objective Strategic target Outcome Performance level Sustainability of the Awarding Organisation Adopt a culture of excellence via TQM Principles and lean leadership; ensuring organisational development and increased profitability Commit to the journey to excellence; successfully deploying the EFQM Quality Standards and Core Values Deploy the Strategic Direction via the organisational structure to support growth, profitability and stakeholder satisfaction Deliver a streamlined Common Process Framework which supports business needs; ensuring with regulator expectation [Ofqual, Qualifications Wales, SQA Accreditation] Manage risks to the awarding function to ensure business continuity Manage projects and change to support organisational agility Achieve minimum score of 550 (out of 1000) against the EFQM model Achieve an increase in net profit Increase the demand for provision Increase the supply of provision Increase the demand for services Increase the supply of services Maintain stakeholder satisfaction Continuously self-evaluate against Conditions and Principles; taking corrective and driving improvement to increase levels Prevent risk profile from exceeding a Risk Tolerance Level 4 Manage change and projects and within the target timescales Achieved 690 Not achieved Achieved Achieved Achieved Achieved Achieved 95% Achieved Achieved Work in progress % (financial year 2014/15) 6% increase in learner registrations (5% increase in learner certifications) 18 new qualifications developed and accredited Target achieved Target achieved 100% of levels maintained Target achieved Target set for 2016 SAR 2015 Page 66 of 147

76 Critical Success Factors Strategic aim Strategic objective Strategic target Outcome Performance level Fit for purpose provision and services Supply new provision and services to meet the demand of our key stakeholders (National Governing Achieved 11 new qualifications for NGBS (of the 18 new qualifications) 2 new services for NGBs Proactively respond to industry demand, stakeholder needs, national and funding initiatives; supplying valid provision and services Explore and exploit opportunities for business development through valid research; entering aggressively to dilute lucrative markets and support organisational growth Monitor the delivery of current provision and services taking action to ensure validity Continuously monitor endorsements, tariffs and funding initiatives; proactively responding to industry and stakeholder needs Bodies) Acquire business from other Awarding Organisations Regulate technical level qualifications to meet demand Supply leadership qualifications to secure learner registrations; increasing our overall market share Supply qualifications to the fitness industry to secure learner registrations; increasing our competitive advantage Supply overseas provision to meet demand and increase brand awareness Supply unregulated provision; meeting industry demand and supporting growth Deliver 100% of the plan of provision, prioritising the needs of National Governing Bodies Not achieved Achieved Not achieved Achieved Work in progress Work in progress Achieved 93% Not achieved 4 x technical qualifications regulated Not achieved 58 learner registrations (instructing Weightlifting) Target set for Target set for Achieve 80% of the predicted Not achieved 57% qualification provision take up Deliver 100% of the plan of services Achieved 100% service plan achieved Support or secure endorsements, tariff points and/or funding for relevant provision and services Secure funding for relevant provision, prioritising strategic partners Work in progress Work in progress Target set for Target set for SAR 2015 Page 67 of 147

77 Critical Success Factors Valuable industry relationships Talented and empowered employees Strategic aim Strategic objective Strategic target Outcome Performance level Collaborate with established organisations and technical consultants for mutual benefit; ensuring expertise, resources and knowledge Motivate and involve employees to achieve performance improvement, innovation and creativity Build sustainable relationships with established industry experts (NGBs, membership organisations and technical consultants) to meet national and international demand Engage in partnerships with colleges, training providers and employers across the home nations to meet both national and local demand Maximise partner satisfaction; deploying bespoke or rationalised solutions based upon partner segmentation Align employee development plans with business needs for mutual added benefit Encourage and motivate employees through involvement in improvement activities Responsive and Deploy an innovative Implement a technology portfolio innovative technology portfolio to which is fit for purpose and meets technology support the awarding stakeholder needs portfolio function and deliver a high standard of service to maintain competitive advantage Table A3.1 Strategic direction achievement and performance levels Maintain the number of partnerships with industry experts considered to be sustainable [ensure relationships with NGBs are maintained] Increase number of partnerships with colleges, training providers or employers Achieved Work in progress Satisfy partners Achieved 87% Support employee participation in training and development activities designed for mutual benefit Ensure a high standard of LEQA and EQA performance in the quality assurance of the delivery of qualifications Involve employees in PPS projects to achieve innovation and creativity Rationalise and redesign the technology portfolio to ensure, process agility and stakeholder satisfaction Achieved 100% Achieved Achieved 100% maintained 3 new partnerships established Target set for % (achieved and exceeded expectations) Target achieved Achieved Target set for SAR 2015 Page 68 of 147

78 Strategic and operational target achievement rate (2015) Not achieved 14% Achieved Achieved 86% Not achieved Chart A3.1 Overview of strategic and operational target achievement (2015) A3.2 Strategic direction performance levels (supporting evidence) Achievement of the plan of provision (2015) Qualification development outcomes (2015) Operational Review 8% Operational Withdraw 4% Expired/Withdrawn Monitor to Cert End Date 4% Development cancelled 5% Operational Monitor 70% Develop/Accredit and implement 14% Development in progress 42% Qualification accredited 53% Chart A3.2 Qualifications plan of provision (2015) Chart A3.3 Development outcomes following review of proposals (2015) SAR 2015 Page 69 of 147

79 Appendix 4 Self-evaluation - Statutory Compliance Outcomes Self-evaluation and monitoring of our with regulations is fundamental to ensure we maintain our awarding status and continue to operate within particular areas and award specific types of qualifications. Therefore, a continuous self-evaluation of our with the following statutory regulations was undertaken: General Conditions of Recognition - Ofqual (September, 2015) General Conditions of Recognition Qualifications Wales (September, 2015) SQA Accreditation s Regulatory Principles (December, 2014) The self-evaluation was conducted using the principles and scale of the RADAR tool for the established approaches, their deployment and assessment and subsequent refinement activities, which enabled a comparison of the results across regulations. RADAR Scale (Assessment of the EFQM Quality Standards) Recognised as a global role model Fully able to Limited ability to Unable to RADAR Scale (manipulated for the assessment of regulations) Recognised as a global role model Fully able to 1 Limited ability to Unable to Evaluation of Approaches Evaluation of Deployment Evaluation of Assessment & Refinement RADAR scale RADAR scale RADAR scale RADAR scale 1: Unable to 2: Limited ability to 3: 4: Fully able to 5: Recognised as global role model RADAR scale 1: Unable to 2: Limited ability to 3: 4: Fully able to 5: Recognised as global role model Table A4.1 Principles of RADAR used to conduct the self-evaluation outcomes RADAR scale 1: Unable to 2: Limited ability to 3: 4: Fully able to 5: Recognised as global role model 1 Any Condition which is identified lower than this point on the scale is classed as non-compliant for the purpose of reporting to the regulators SAR 2015 Page 70 of 147

80 Outcomes of the self-evaluation are summarised in the table below and further analysed in the following pages. Summary of self-evaluation outcomes against regulations (2015) RADAR Scale (Manipulated for Assessment of the Regulations) Ofqual General Conditions of Recognition (September, 2015) Qualifications Wales General Conditions of Recognition (September, 2015) Recognised as a global role model 0% (0 areas) 0% (0 areas) 0% (0 areas) Fully able to 37% (22 areas) 41% (22 areas) 13% (2 areas) 60% (36 areas) 57% (31 areas) 87% (13 areas) Limited ability to 0% (0 areas) 0% (0 areas) 0% (0 areas) Unable to 0% (0 areas) 0% (0 areas) 0% (0 areas) Not applicable 3% (2 areas) 2% (1 area) 0% (0 areas) Table A4.2 Summary of self-evaluation outcomes SQA Accreditation s Regulatory Principles (December, 2014) It must be noted that although at the current time our levels against the Ofqual General Conditions of Recognition is 100%, throughout 2015 there have been four instances of fluctuation on our levels with regards to conditions G5, G8, H2 and I4. Compliance improvement activities have therefore been undertaken to reinstate our levels. A more detailed progress report as part of the self-evaluation summary is provided in table A4.3. Our levels against the Qualification Wales General Conditions of Recognition in 2015 is 100%, with no fluctuations being identified. Our levels against the SQA Accreditation Principles is 100%, however throughout 2015 there has been a fluctuation on our levels with regards to principles P01 and P02. Compliance improvement activities have therefore been undertaken to reinstate our levels. A more detailed progress report as part of the self-evaluation summary is provided in table A4.5. SAR 2015 Page 71 of 147

81 Self-evaluation outcomes against Ofqual General Conditions of Recognition (September 2015) Condition Number A1 A2 A3 Condition Title Suitability for continuing recognition Establishment in the EU or the EFTA Safeguards on change of control Controls and Informal A4 Conflicts of interest A5 A6 A7 A8 B1 Availability of adequate resources and arrangements Identification and management of risks Management of incidents Mal and maladministration The role of the responsible officer and Informal Compliance Status Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Compliance Summary Good Good Good Good Good Good Compliance Progress Report No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. SAR 2015 Page 72 of 147

82 Condition Number B2 B3 B4 B5 B6 B7 B8 C1 C2 Condition Title The annual statement to Ofqual Notification to Ofqual of certain events Notice to provide information to Ofqual Representations regarding qualifications Cooperation with Ofqual Compliance with Regulatory Documents Compliance with undertakings given to Ofqual Arrangements with third parties Arrangements with publishers Controls Compliance Status Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Compliance Summary Good Good Good Good Good Compliance Progress Report No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. SAR 2015 Page 73 of 147

83 Condition Number C3 D1 D2 Condition Title Arrangements with centres Fitness for purpose of qualifications Accessibility of qualifications Controls Not applicable D3 Reviewing approach and Informal D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 Responding to enquiries and complaints procedures Compliance of qualifications with Regulatory Documents Compliance of units developed by others with Regulatory Documents Management of the withdrawal of qualifications Making available information to help meet Teachers needs Compliance Compliance Compliance Progress Report Status Summary Not applicable Not applicable N/A Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Good Good Good Good Good No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. SAR 2015 Page 74 of 147

84 Condition Number E1 E2 Condition Title Qualifications having an objective and support Requirements on qualification titling Controls Compliance Status Fully able to Compliance Summary Good Compliance Progress Report No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. E3 Publication of a qualification specification No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. E4 E5 Ensuring an assessment is fit for purpose and can be delivered Assurance that qualifications comply with the conditions and Informal Fully able to Good No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. E6 Submitting qualifications to the register and Informal No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. E7 Total Qualification Time and Informal No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. E8 Credit No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. E9 E10 Qualification and Component levels Recognition of Prior Learning No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. SAR 2015 Page 75 of 147

85 Condition Number F1 F2 Condition Title Information on fees and features of a qualification Packaging qualifications with other products or services Controls and Informal Not applicable F3 Invoicing G1 Setting the assessment G2 G3 G4 Language of the assessment Use of language and Stimulus Materials Maintaining confidentiality of assessment materials, including the conduct of specified training events G5 Registration of Learners Compliance Status Not applicable Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Compliance Summary Not applicable Good Good Good Good Compliance Progress Report No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. N/A No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. Compliance levels related to the approach has decreased slightly after an incident detected that learners are not all aware of their registration period. This information is currently available to them via the learner pack. However a improvement activity has been instigated to ensure that this is made more prominent in the revised learner pack template being devised in preparation for the launch of the FRQ. On the basis that this information is currently available to learners, the overall score has been maintained. SAR 2015 Page 76 of 147

86 Condition Number G6 G7 G8 G9 H1 H2 H3 Condition Title Arrangements for Reasonable Adjustments Arrangements for Special Consideration Completion of the assessment under the required conditions Delivering the assessment Marking the assessment Moderation where an assessment is marked by a Centre Monitoring the specified levels of attainment for a qualification Controls Compliance Status Compliance Summary Compliance Progress Report No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non- detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non- detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. Compliance levels decreased after it was identified that two learners had supplied identical answers to some questions, which included the same mistakes. Adverse effects were mitigated by having the learners resit the exam to ensure their marks are genuine and that the answers are all their own work. Additionally, the center was tasked with changing the layout of the room for written assessments. The 1st4sport invigilation guidance was reviewed and updated as a improvement activity to prevent occurrence. There is no evidence to suggest that this has happened before in this center or others and therefore risks were mitigated and levels reinstated. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non- detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non- detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. Compliance levels fluctuated slightly after an external verifier failed to conduct DCS in accordance with the standard procedure and a centre attempted to certificate a learner without records of appropriate evidence. Risk and adverse effects were mitigated by ensuring that the learner was not certificated and the centre subject to verification activity. Compliance improvement activities are currently in progress; the EVA is being conducted to enable improvement in the EQA arrangements. Despite fluctuation of levels as set via the intrinsic RADAR review mechanism; an assessment of the situation deemed that overall status for this Condition should be maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non- detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. SAR 2015 Page 77 of 147

87 Condition Number H4 H5 Condition Title Adjudication by Ofqual of specified levels of attainment for a qualification Results for a qualification must be based on sufficient Controls evidence H6 Issuing results I1 Appeals process I2 I3 I4 Compliance with Ofqual s appeals and complaints process The design and content of certificates Issuing certificates and replacement certificates Compliance Status Compliance Summary Compliance Progress Report J1 Interpretation and definitions and Informal Table A4.3 Self-evaluation outcomes against Ofqual Conditions of Recognition (2015) No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non- detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non- detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non- detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non- detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non- detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non- detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. Compliance levels fluctuated slightly after it was identified that a learner has been certificated for a 1st4sport qualification without having achieved the qualification pre-requisites. An investigation was initiated and action taken to mitigate any risks. A improvement activity was also initiated to ensure that the initial assessment of learners within the delivery centre is reinforced. Despite fluctuation of levels as set via the intrinsic RADAR review mechanism; an assessment of the situation deemed that overall status for this Condition should be maintained due to the risk mitigation and also the improvement activities. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non- detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. SAR 2015 Page 78 of 147

88 Self-evaluation outcomes against Qualifications Wales General Conditions of Recognition (September 2015) Condition Number A1 A2 A3 Condition Title Controls Compliance status Suitability for continuing and recognition Informal Establishment in the EU or the EFTA Safeguards on change of control A4 Conflicts of interest A5 A6 A7 A8 B1 B2 B3 B4 Availability of adequate resources and arrangements Identification and management of risks Management of incidents Mal and maladministration The role of the responsible officer The annual statement to Welsh Government Notification to Welsh Government of certain events Notice to provide information to Welsh Government and Informal Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Compliance summary Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Compliance progress report No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. SAR 2015 Page 79 of 147

89 Condition Number B5 B6 B7 B8 C1 C2 D1 D2 Condition Title Representations regarding qualifications Cooperation with Welsh Government Compliance with Regulatory Documents Compliance with undertakings given to Welsh Government Arrangements with third parties Arrangements with centres Fitness for purpose of qualifications Accessibility of qualifications Controls D3 Reviewing approach and Informal D4 D5 D6 Responding to enquiries and complaints procedures Compliance of qualifications with Regulatory Documents Compliance of units developed by others with Regulatory Documents Compliance Status Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Fully able to Compliance Summary Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Good Compliance Progress Report No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. SAR 2015 Page 80 of 147

90 Condition Number D7 D8 E1 E2 E3 E4 E5 F1 F2 Condition Title Management of the change in the status of qualifications or withdrawal of qualifications Making available information to help teachers' needs Qualifications having an objective and support Requirements on qualification titling Publication of a qualification specification Ensuring an assessment is fit for purpose and can be delivered Assurance that qualifications comply with the conditions Information on fees and features of a qualification Packaging qualifications with other products or services Controls and Informal and Informal Not applicable F3 Invoicing G1 Setting the assessment Compliance Status Fully able to Fully able to Not applicable Fully able to Fully able to Compliance Summary Good Good Not applicable Good Good Compliance Progress Report No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. N/A No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. SAR 2015 Page 81 of 147

91 Condition Number G2 G3 G4 Condition Title Language of the assessment Use of language and Stimulus Materials Maintaining confidentiality of assessment materials, including the conduct of specified training events Controls G5 Registration of Learners G6 G7 G8 G9 Arrangements for Reasonable Adjustments Arrangements for Special Consideration Completion of the assessment under the required conditions Delivering the assessment H1 Marking the assessment H2 H3 Moderation where an assessment is marked by a Centre Monitoring the specified levels of attainment for a qualification Compliance Status Fully able to Fully able to Compliance Summary Good Good Compliance Progress Report No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. A improvement activity has however been instigated to make registration details more accessible to learners by making this more prominent in the learner pack template being designed for the RQF. Compliance has therefore been maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. SAR 2015 Page 82 of 147

92 Condition Number H4 H5 Condition Title Adjudication by Qualifications Wales of specified levels of attainment for a qualification Results for a qualification must be based on sufficient Controls evidence H6 Issuing results I1 Appeals process I2 I3 I4 Compliance with Ofqual s appeals and complaints process The design and content of certificates Issuing certificates and replacement certificates Compliance Status Compliance Summary Compliance Progress Report J1 Interpretation and definitions and Informal Table A4.4 Self-evaluation outcomes against Welsh Government Conditions of Recognition (2015) No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. SAR 2015 Page 83 of 147

93 Self-evaluation Summary SQA Accreditation s Regulatory Principles (December 2014) Principle SQA Principles 2014 Controls Compliance status Compliance Summary Compliance Progress Report P01 P02 P03 The awarding body shall have clearly defined and effective governance arrangements. The awarding body shall ensure it has the necessary resources to effectively carry out its operational functions to meet regulatory requirements. The awarding body shall have clearly defined business planning processes which show evidence of management commitment, decision making and ongoing review. Fully able to Good Compliance levels have fluctuated on the basis that 1st4sport Leadership and Management Approach is under review resultant of an AO restructure. SQA Accreditation were made aware of the new Accountable Officer. However the review of the all Approaches are not due to be completed and uploaded into Quickr until 01 December The Launch of the restructure was presented to all internal staff in May The website has been updated to ensure all stakeholders are aware of the revised teams and External Verifiers communicated to via and via the Coordinating EVs. This presentation has been uploaded into Quickr to ensure that the overall level is maintained whilst the review of documentation is completed and communicated to SQA Accreditation. Compliance levels have fluctuated on the basis that 1st4sport Leadership and Management Approach is under review resultant of an AO restructure. SQA Accreditation were made aware of the new Accountable Officer. However, the review of the all Approaches are not due to be completed and uploaded into Quickr until 01 December The Launch of the restructure was presented to all internal staff in May The website has been updated to ensure all stakeholders are aware of the revised teams and External Verifiers communicated to via and via the Coordinating EVs. This presentation has been uploaded into Quickr to ensure that the overall level is maintained whilst the review of documentation is completed and communicated to SQA Accreditation. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. SAR 2015 Page 84 of 147

94 Principle SQA Principles 2014 Controls Compliance status Compliance Summary Compliance Progress Report P04 The awarding body shall continually review the effectiveness of its business services, systems, policies and processes. Fully able to Good No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. P05 The awarding body shall provide clear information on its procedures, products and services and ensure that they are accurate and appropriate to SQA accredited qualifications. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. 06 The awarding body and its providers shall maintain accurate documents, records and data. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. P07 The awarding body shall have effective arrangements for communicating with its staff, stakeholders and SQA Accreditation. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. P08 The awarding body shall ensure that SQA Accreditation is granted access to all information pertaining to SQA accredited qualifications. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. P09 The awarding body shall ensure that it has robust systems and processes for the identification, design, development, implementation and review of qualifications, which meet the needs of users. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. SAR 2015 Page 85 of 147

95 Principle SQA Principles 2014 Controls P10 P11 P12 P13 P14 The awarding body shall ensure that it has the necessary arrangements and resources for the effective delivery, assessment and quality assurance of SQA accredited qualifications. The awarding body shall ensure that its qualifications and their assessment are inclusive and accessible to learners. The awarding body and its providers shall have open and transparent systems to manage complaints. The awarding body and its providers shall have clear, fair and equitable procedures to manage appeals. The awarding body and its providers shall ensure that it has safeguards to prevent and manage cases of mal and maladministration. Compliance status Compliance Summary Compliance Progress Report No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. P15 The awarding body and its providers shall ensure that it has safeguards to prevent and manage cases of mal and maladministration. No fluctuation of levels with no risk, incidents or non detected. No improvement activities deemed necessary against this particular condition in this annual cycle. Compliance was maintained. Table A4.5 Self-evaluation outcomes against SQA Accreditation s Regulatory Principles (2015) SAR 2015 Page 86 of 147

96 Percentage Percentage Appendix 5 Stakeholder satisfaction levels Outcomes of the stakeholder survey, which identify satisfaction levels based on our performance and services are presented in four parts: the awarding organisation, quality management, qualification provision, awarding services and awarding systems. A5.1 Stakeholder satisfaction levels - The Awarding Organisation 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport is managed effectively with clear lines of accountability operating within a culture of excellence 60% 48% 40% 32% 33% 27% 29% 28% 27% 21% 18% 10% 11% 8% 3% 0% 3% 3% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known Responses Chart A5.1 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport is managed effectively with clear lines of accountability operating within a culture of excellence 1st4sport's reputation and image within the education industry is very positive 60% 55% 53% 48% 50% 40% 31% 36% 32% 33% 33% 30% 18% 20% 12% 11% 13% 7% 8% 10% 2% 4% 5% 0% 0% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses Chart A5.2 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport s reputation and image within the education industry is very positive To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known SAR 2015 Page 87 of 147

97 Percentage Percentage 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 28% 1st4sport ensure the development and maintenance of effective business relationships with stakeholders resulting in business loyalty 47% 53% 36% 29% 30% 25% 15% 13% 7% 7% 8% 8% 7% 3% 4% 3% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses Chart A5.3 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure the development and maintenance of effective business relationships with its stakeholders, resulting in business loyalty 33% 47% To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known 1st4sport embrace ethical, environmental, legal and regulatory responsibility throughout its activities 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 63% 46% 47% 40% 42% 33% 25% 21% 23% 11% 13% 8% 7% 10% 5% 7% 0% 0% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known Responses Chart A5.4 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport embrace ethical, environmental, legal and regulatory responsibility throughout its activities SAR 2015 Page 88 of 147

98 Percentage Percentage 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport provides qualifications that are of value to each learner's career/role and therefore contribute to society 47% 38% 54% 29% 11% 11% 1% 3% 4% 4% Chart A5.5 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport s provide qualifications that are of value in learner s career/role and therefore contribute to the society 70% 25% 5% 27% 60% 13% 0% 0% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport provide the industries within which we operate with a quality-assured and cost-effective qualification awarding service 41% 43% 29% 50% 11% 11% 11% 4% 1% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff 65% Responses Chart A5.6 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport provide the industries within which we operate with a quality-assured and cost-effective qualification awarding service 25% 3% 5% 3% 27% 60% 13% 0% 0% To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known SAR 2015 Page 89 of 147

99 Percentage Percentage 1st4sport operate in a fair and equitable manner 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 75% 51% 50% 53% 40% 36% 33% 15% 11% 13% 3% 2% 5% 4% 5% 0% 3% 3% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known Responses Chart A5.7 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport operate in a fair and equitable manner 1st4sport deliver professional services 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 50% 39% 39% 39% 9% 21% Chart A5.8 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport deliver professional services 70% 7% 1% 1% 0% 0% 3% 3% 0% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses 25% 33% 60% To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known SAR 2015 Page 90 of 147

100 Percentage Percentage 1st4sport promote teamwork 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 65% 53% 34% 35% 36% 36% 33% 23% 15% 13% 14% 13% 3% 7% 7% 5% 5% 3% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known Responses Chart A5.9 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport promote teamwork 1st4sport are open to learn 70% 60% 58% To The Full Extent 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 40% 34% 29% 32% 33% 29% 30% 27% 21% 18% 15% 11% 7% 4% 3% 5% 5% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known Responses Chart A5.10 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport are open to learn SAR 2015 Page 91 of 147

101 Percentage Percentage 1st4sport preserve a personal touch 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 60% 53% 38% 39% 40% 30% 32% 25% 30% 19% 6% 8% 7% 4% 0% 3% 5% 3% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known Responses Chart A5.11 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport preserve a personal touch 1st4sport try to maintain a sense of humour and have fun 70% 60% 63% To The Full Extent 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 40% 40% 33% 32% 32% 28% 22% 21% 23% 20% 11% 6% 7% 7% 5% 5% 5% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known Responses Chart A5.12 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport try to maintain a sense of humour and have fun SAR 2015 Page 92 of 147

102 Percentage Percentage A5.2 Stakeholder satisfaction levels - Quality Management 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport has improved over the last year in meeting stakeholder needs/expectations and providing value added service 53% To The Full Extent 40% 37% 35% 29% 25% 22% 18% 19% 18% 18% 18% 11% 5% 3% 5% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses Chart A5.13 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport has improved over the last year in meeting stakeholder needs/expectations and providing value added service 7% 27% 0% 13% To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport quality assure the delivery of our qualifications through effective internal and external verification 80% 46% 33% 32% 36% 30% 21% 16% 11% 13% 7% 1% 4% 0% 3% 3% 0% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff 65% Responses To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known Chart A5.14 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport quality assure the delivery of our qualifications through effective internal and external verification SAR 2015 Page 93 of 147

103 Percentage Percentage 1st4sport manage risk via the implementation and monitoring of effective action plans for centres 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 42% 29% 32% 21% 25% 14% 13% 14% 7% 1% Chart A5.15 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport manage risk via the implementation and monitoring of effective action plans 65% 23% 73% 20% 8% 5% 7% 0% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known A5.3 Stakeholder satisfaction levels Qualification Provision 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport develop, deliver and award qualifications that meet the needs of end users (learners, centres, employers) 48% 34% 36% 36% 25% 65% 14% 5% 7% 1% 3% 4% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Chart A5.16 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport develop, deliver and award qualifications that meet the needs of end users (learners, centres, employers) 30% Responses 27% 67% To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known SAR 2015 Page 94 of 147

104 Percentage Percentage 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport ensure that the title, size, structure and content of qualifications are clear, use appropriate language and are fit for purpose 67% 58% To The Full Extent 45% 39% 35% 27% 29% 29% 22% 20% 13% 5% 2% 4% 4% 0% 3% 0% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known Chart A5.17 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure that the title, size, structure and content of qualifications are clear, use appropriate language and are fit for purpose 70% 67% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport ensure qualification resources are clear and effective for the use of centre staff and learners 45% 48% 43% 27% 29% 29% 25% 21% 20% 11% 7% 8% 3% 4% 3% To A Large Extent To Some Extent 13% Not At All 0% 0% 0% Not Known Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff To The Full Extent Responses Chart A5.18 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure qualification resources are clear and effective for the use of centre staff and learners SAR 2015 Page 95 of 147

105 Percentage Percentage 1st4sport clearly define the assessment, the level of difficulty and the way in which it should be carried out 70% 67% To The Full Extent 60% 50% 50% 43% 46% To A Large Extent 40% 40% 28% 29% To Some Extent 30% 22% 20% 20% 14% 13% Not At All 10% 6% 7% 10% 1% 4% 0% 0% 0% 0% Not Known 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses Chart A5.19 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport clearly define the assessment, level of difficulty and the way in which it should be carried out 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport ensure assessment guidance clearly confirms the standards of knowledge and performance required by learners 67% To The Full Extent 50% 50% 39% 43% To A Large Extent 31% 32% 24% 27% To Some Extent Not At All 11% 8% 7% 2% 5% 7% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% Not Known Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses Chart A5.20 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure assessment guidance clearly confirms the standards of knowledge and performance required by learners SAR 2015 Page 96 of 147

106 Percentage Percentage 1st4sport assessment methods and tools do not create barriers to access or learner achievement 70% 60% 58% To The Full Extent 50% 43% 47% To A Large Extent 40% 33% 36% 35% 33% To Some Extent 30% 25% 25% 22% 20% 20% Not At All 10% 6% 4% 4% 4% 5% 0% 3% 0% 0% 0% Not Known Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses Chart A5.21 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport assessment methods and tools do not create barriers to access or learner achievement 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport promote equality ensuring barriers to access are identified and mitigated through needs based access arrangements 42% 43% 35% 32% 68% 20% 16% 11% 11% 13% 13% 6% 2% 4% 0% 0% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses 33% 53% To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known Chart A5.22 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport promote equality ensuring barriers to access are identified and mitigated through needs based access arrangements SAR 2015 Page 97 of 147

107 Percentage Percentage A5.4 Stakeholder satisfaction levels Awarding Services 50% 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% 1st4sport ensure that information on awarding services, qualification, features and fees are easily accessible with clear pricing structures 48% 41% 29% 29% 18% 4% 8% 36% 35% 14% 7% 14% Chart A5.23 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure that information on awarding services, qualification, features and fees are easily accessible with clear pricing structures 3% 10% 5% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses 33% 27% 40% 0% 0% To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known 50% 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% 1st4sport ensure that any increase in fees is communicated a reasonable timeframe in advance to enable centres to plan accordingly 47% 40% To The Full Extent 37% 35% 33% 27% 29% To A Large Extent 28% 24% 25% 25% To Some Extent 14% 13% 10% Not At All 7% 2% 3% 3% 0% 0% Not Known Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses Chart A5.24 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure that any increase in fees is communicated a reasonable timeframe in advance to enable centres to plan accordingly SAR 2015 Page 98 of 147

108 Percentage Percentage 1st4sport ensure effective communication across stakeholders via regular newsletters 70% 60% 60% 60% To The Full Extent 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 41% 27% 25% 29% 25% 28% 27% 12% 15% 14% 5% 7% 3% 10% 7% 7% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known Responses Chart A5.25 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure effective communication across stakeholders via regular newsletters 1st4sport ensure a response to enquiries within 5 working days 70% 60% 60% 49% 50% 39% 40% 33% 32% 35% 30% 25% 25% 21% 18% 18% 20% 20% 13% 8% 10% 5% 7% 2% 4% 3% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses Chart A5.26 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure a response to enquiries within 5 working days To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known SAR 2015 Page 99 of 147

109 Percentage Percentage 50% 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% 1st4sport ensure requests for course/programme authorisation are processed and confirmed within 5 working days of receipt 40% 32% 28% 29% 23% 21% 8% 11% 7% 1% Chart A5.27 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure requests for course/programme authorisation are processed and confirmed within 5 working days of receipt 45% 33% 20% 20% 3% 33% 33% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses 13% To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport ensure learner/workforce resources are dispatched at a minimum of 10 working days prior to the start date of the course/programme 67% 40% 34% 32% 25% 11% 14% 11% 7% 1% 25% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Chart A5.28 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure learner/workforce resources are dispatched at a minimum of 10 working days prior to the start date of the course/programme 45% Responses 18% 5% 3% 30% 27% 0% 0% 7% To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known SAR 2015 Page 100 of 147

110 Percentage Percentage 1st4sport ensure learner registrations are processed within 20 working days of receipt 60% 50% 50% 47% 40% 40% 37% 36% 33% 33% 29% 30% 20% 21% 20% 11% 13% 13% 10% 4% 5% 7% 4% 0% 0% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses Chart A5.29 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure learner registrations are processed within 20 working days of receipt To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport ensure claims for certification are validated, processed and dispatched within 20 working days of receipt 53% To The Full Extent 39% 31% 8% 22% 29% 25% 18% 0% 0% 29% 40% Chart A5.30 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure claims for certification are validated, processed and dispatched within 20 working days of receipt 38% 27% 13% 13% 5% 5% 7% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known SAR 2015 Page 101 of 147

111 Percentage Percentage 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport ensure request for replacement certificates are validated, processed and dispatched within 10 working days of receipt 31% 29% 7% 33% 25% 25% 11% 0% 0% 39% 38% Chart A5.31 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure request for replacement certificates are validated, processed and dispatched within 10 working days of receipt 45% 27% 60% 13% 10% 3% 5% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% 1st4sport ensure written assessment papers are dispatched at a minimum of 5 working days prior to the specified date on the request 43% 39% 40% 40% 38% To The Full Extent 35% 31% 28% To A Large Extent 25% 25% 6% 7% 0% 4% 10% 10% Chart A5.32 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure written assessment papers are dispatched at a minimum of 5 working days prior to the specified date on the request 7% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses 13% To Some Extent Not At All Not Known SAR 2015 Page 102 of 147

112 Percentage Percentage 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport ensure cancellation/postponement/termination requests are processed within 10 working days prior to the specified date 53% 48% To The Full Extent 34% 27% 35% 29% 25% 39% 38% 13% 7% 8% 8% 7% 4% 0% 0% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses 27% To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known Chart A5.33 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure cancellation/postponement/termination requests are processed within 10 working days prior to the specified date 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport ensure learner transferral/withdrawal requests are processed within 10 working days prior to the specified date 53% 48% To The Full Extent 37% 32% 26% 29% 25% 39% Chart A5.34 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure learner transferral/withdrawal requests are processed within 10 working days 38% 13% 10% 5% 7% 5% 7% 0% 0% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses 27% To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known SAR 2015 Page 103 of 147

113 Percentage Percentage A5.5 Stakeholder satisfaction levels Awarding Systems 1st4sport ensure current and relevant information for centres and learner is provided via the website 70% 61% 58% To The Full Extent 60% 50% 43% To A Large Extent 39% 40% 32% 28% 29% To Some Extent 30% 25% 18% 20% 13% 13% Not At All 11% 11% 10% 8% 10% 2% 0% 0% 0% 0% Not Known 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses Chart A5.35 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport ensure current and relevant information for centres and learners is provided via the website 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport have effectively designed and implemented online course authorisation, learner registration and certification services 38% 35% 36% 29% 18% 18% 11% 8% 7% 2% 38% 33% Chart A5.36 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport have effectively designed and implemented online course authorisation, learner registration and certification services 10% 20% 20% 53% 27% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses 0% To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known SAR 2015 Page 104 of 147

114 Percentage 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 1st4sport have effectively designed and implemented a web based quality assurance system (Athena/Creatio) 34% 30% 25% 25% 19% 21% 18% 13% 11% 4% 48% 40% Chart A5.37 Perceptions on whether 1st4sport have effectively designed and implemented a web based quality assurance system (Athena/Creatio) 61% 39% 8% 5% 0% 0% 0% 0% Recognised Centres Qualification Partners 1st4sport EVs 1st4sport Staff Responses To The Full Extent To A Large Extent To Some Extent Not At All Not Known SAR 2015 Page 105 of 147

115 Appendix 6 Learner Satisfaction Levels Information from learner evaluation forms, which are completed by learners following completion of their course are analysed to identify learner satisfaction rate, value of the 1st4sports qualifications and improvement activities, where required. Trends in learner responses ( ) Trends in learner responsiveness rate ( ) 25,000 40% 20,000 15,000 10,000 5, ,540 19,904 19,190 17,000 14,377 10,616 5, % 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% 30% 32% 31% 27% 27% 16% 8% Year Year Chart A6.1 Responses received via the learner evaluation form Chart A6.2 Response rate of certificated learners Overall value of 1st4sport qualifications as identified by learners (2015) Good 18% Average 2% Poor 1% Very Good Good Very Good 79% Average Poor Chart A6.3 Value of 1st4sport qualifications as identified by learners SAR 2015 Page 106 of 147

116 Number of learners Number of learners Number of learners In order to identify the levels of customer/end user loyalty to our services and the value of our products a statistical analysis was undertaken to establish the number of learners (69,949) that obtained more than one of our qualifications in The largest number of 1st4sport Qualifications obtained by two learners is ,000 70,000 60,000 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10, ,949 Number of learners that have obtained multiple 1st4sport qualifications (2015) 14,620 Chart A6.4 Learners with multiple 1st4sport qualifications (2015) 4,040 1, Number of qualifications obtained by learners Number of learners that have obtained multiple 1st4sport qualifications (2014) Number of learners that have obtained multiple 1st4sport qualifications (2013) 70,000 60,000 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10, ,239 12,220 3,110 1, ,000 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10, ,601 10,662 2, Number of qualifications obtained by learners Number of qualifications obtained by learners Chart A6.5 Learners with multiple 1st4sport qualifications (2014) Chart A6.6 Learners with multiple 1st4sport qualifications (2013) SAR 2015 Page 107 of 147

117 Appendix 7 1st4sport Employee Satisfaction Levels Table A7.1 shows responses provided by 1st4sport employees and the Executive Management Team (EMT), in order to present the different perceptions and levels of satisfaction. Charts A7.1 A7.4 show the results from both respondent types grouped together. Employee satisfaction levels (2015) Statements Respondent To the full extent To a large extent To some extent Not at all Line management is effective, increases employees motivation and helps them fulfil their role There are sufficient opportunities for employees further learning, development and career growth Employees are involved in the relevant areas and empowered to implement improvements/take initiatives Employees are provided with sufficient training to undertake their role effectively Employees receive recognition and genuine appreciation for their contributions Employees are respected, valued and treated equally There are appropriate and sufficient resources to help employees undertake their daily activities The current building/facilities are of high-quality The organisational culture and working environment conditions are very fulfilling Communication is effective and employees are aware of overall objectives and/or changes made Ethics, code of conduct and processes are appropriate Overall employees are very satisfied/fulfilled with their job Table A7.1 Employee satisfaction levels Employees 17% 28% 44% 6% EMT 29% 43% 0% 0% Employees 6% 6% 61% 22% EMT 14% 43% 14% 0% Employees 6% 17% 72% 0% EMT 14% 57% 0% 0% Employees 6% 56% 28% 6% EMT 29% 43% 0% 0% Employees 0% 22% 61% 11% EMT 14% 57% 0% 0% Employees 22% 28% 44% 0% EMT 57% 14% 0% 0% Employees 6% 50% 22% 17% EMT 29% 43% 0% 0% Employees 6% 17% 61% 11% EMT 29% 43% 0% 0% Employees 0% 33% 56% 6% EMT 43% 29% 0% 0% Employees 0% 28% 61% 6% EMT 14% 57% 0% 0% Employees 6% 61% 28% 0% EMT 57% 14% 0% 0% Employees 6% 33% 44% 11% EMT 29% 43% 0% 0% SAR 2015 Page 108 of 147

118 Percentage The greatest dissatisfaction expressed by employees is in relation to: the opportunities for further learning, development and career growth (83% dissatisfaction rate) the employees involvement in relevant areas and empowerment to implement improvements/take initiatives (72% dissatisfaction rate) the company s recognition and genuine appreciation for the employees contributions (72% dissatisfaction rate) the quality of the current building/facilities (72% dissatisfaction rate) the organisational culture and working environment conditions (62% dissatisfaction rate) the communication and employees awareness of overall objectives and/or changes made (67% dissatisfaction rate). 1st4sport employee satisfaction levels (part one) 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 23% 36% 36% 5% Line management is effective, increases employees motivation and helps them fulfil their role 55% 18% 18% 9% 9% There are sufficient opportunities for employees further learning, development and career growth 32% 59% 0% Employees are involved in the relevant areas and empowered to implement improvements/take initiatives To the full extent To a large extent To some extent Not at all Responses Chart A7.1 Employees and EMT responses on satisfaction with line management, personal development and involvement/empowerment SAR 2015 Page 109 of 147

119 Percentage Percentage 1st4sport employee satisfaction levels (part two) 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 14% 59% 23% 5% Employees are provided with sufficient training to undertake their role effectively 5% 36% 50% 9% Employees receive recognition and genuine appreciation for their contributions 36% 27% 36% 0% Employees are respected, valued and treated equally 14% 55% 18% 14% There are appropriate and sufficient resources to help employees undertake their daily activities To the full extent To a large extent To some extent Not at all Responses Chart A7.2 Employees and EMT responses on satisfaction with training, recognition and respect, and available resources 1st4sport employee satisfaction levels (part three) 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 27% 50% 14% 14% 9% The current building/facilities are of high-quality 36% 45% The organisational culture and working environment conditions are very fulfilling 41% 50% 5% 5% 5% Communication is effective and employees are aware of overall objectives and/or changes made 23% 55% 23% 0% Ethics, code of conduct and processes are appropriate To the full extent To a large extent To some extent Not at all Responses Chart A7.3 Employees and EMT responses on satisfaction with facilities, organisational culture, communication and ethics/code of conduct SAR 2015 Page 110 of 147

120 Percentage 1st4sport employee and EMT perceptions as to overall, whether employees are very satisfied/fulfilled with their job (2015) To some extent 36% Not at all 5% To the full extent 23% To the full extent To a large extent To some extent To a large extent 36% Chart A7.4 Employees and EMT responses on overall satisfaction/fulfilment working for 1st4sport Not at all Overall employee satisfaction levels showed a change in comparison to past years. Based on the employees responses the overall satisfaction levels appear to have decreased. 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 7% 79% 1st4sport employee responses to: 'Overall I am very satisfied/fulfilled with my job' ( ) 14% 0% 68% 66% 23% 22% 37% 53% 56% 5% 6% 6% 5% 5% 0% Chart A7.5 Trends in the levels of employee satisfaction across years (employee responses only EMT responses not included) 22% 22% 0% 6% 44% 33% 36% 36% Responses 11% 23% 5% To the full extent To a large extent To some extent Not at all SAR 2015 Page 111 of 147

121 Outcomes from the analysis of the qualitative feedback resultant of the employee satisfaction survey are presented in the following table. General Deductive Analysis - Qualitative Data (Employee satisfaction survey 2015) Category Deductive Themes Frequency of raw statistics Strengths Good benefits package. 1 Ensure employees are empowered, valued, rewarded and supported more. 6 Increase the opportunities for career, personal development/training and growth. 4 Areas for development Revise and improve the organisational and team structure to support business needs, innovation and productivity, based on realigned roles. Recruit more staff to resolve the critical issue currently faced with insufficiency of resources and heavy workload, to ensure the organisation remains sustainable. Create initiatives for employees to work harder based on a reward scheme and provide the opportunity to get involved in additional areas in order to use their full potential. Ensure salaries are at the appropriate industry level and pay structure/rises are proportionate to the workload and hard work of the employees. Review and improve the external verification approach to ensure it is still relevant and remains in line with the strategic direction. Revise the strategic direction and ensure it is communicated to all employees who will be working towards the achievement of the targets as a collective Rationalise processes and systems to improve efficiency, and service levels. 2 Improve the organisational culture and integrate the three teams to ensure they work towards the same clear direction, which is defined and communicated by the top and middle management. 2 Ensure the top management listen to what the employees have to say and have faith in them. 2 Improve communication across levels of management and teams. 2 Work with employees to target problematic areas and establish solutions. 2 Revise and improve the appraisal process. 1 Table A7.2 Analysis of the qualitative data resulted from the employee satisfaction survey SAR 2015 Page 112 of 147

122 Appendix 8 External Quality Assurers (EQAs) - Satisfaction Levels on Training Provision Feedback from external quality assurers and coordinating external quality assurers is collated via the Event Evaluation/Forum Feedback Form upon completion of training events. The following table and charts reflect the EQA satisfaction levels on 1st4sport provision of training. Evaluation of 1st4sport training and standardisation events Evaluation areas Very Good Good Fair Poor The pre-event planning (agenda, documents, directions, structure, timetable and content) 83% 13% 4% 0% The overall organisation and management of the event/forum 83% 13% 4% 0% The use of materials-equipment provided for the needs of the event 58% 38% 4% 0% The time allocated to cover the agenda issues or any additional subjects 54% 42% 4% 0% The presentations by 1st4sport 71% 29% 0% 0% The extent to which the event met EQA s requirements/personal objectives 63% 33% 4% 0% The opportunities to get involved in the event, raise concerns and provide feedback 79% 21% 0% 0% The opportunities (for EQAs) to interact with 1st4sport staff 79% 21% 0% 0% Relevance of information provided and related implementation to the EQA s area of work 92% 8% 0% 0% Table A8.1 Quantitative feedback on 1st4sport training events provided to EQAs EQA's evaluation outcomes on training events (2015) Good 17% Fair 4% Very Good Good Very Good 79% Fair Chart A8.1 Evaluation outcomes of 1st4sport training events provided to EQAs SAR 2015 Page 113 of 147

123 Appendix 9 Qualification Specific Performance Statistics The following statistics indicate the demand for our qualifications (registrations, certifications, enquiries, recognition and qualification approval applications) and qualification specific information (actions imposed on centres, access arrangements and incidents). Qualifications with the largest registration and certification variance are highlighted in tables 9.1 and 9.2. Data must be treated with caution as in some cases figures refer to qualifications which were due their expiry date and qualifications that have been launched in st4sport trends in learner registrations per qualification ( ) Qualification title Number of registered learners Change ( ) Count % Entry Level Award in Assisting with Basic Care of Horses (Entry 2) (QCF) N/A Entry Level Award in Basic Knowledge of the Horseracing Industry (Entry 3) (QCF) N/A Entry Level Award In Catching and Leading, Grooming and Rugging up a Horse (Entry 3) (QCF) N/A Entry Level Award In Recognising, Putting on and Cleaning Saddle and Bridle (Entry 3) (QCF) N/A Functional Skills Qualification in English at Level % Functional Skills Qualification in English at Level % Functional Skills Qualification in Mathematics at Level % Functional Skills Qualification in Maths at Level % Level 1 Award in an Introduction to the Horseracing Industry (QCF) % Level 1 Award In Coaching Angling (QCF) % Level 1 Award In Coaching Archery (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Badminton (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Basketball (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Boccia (QCF) % Level 1 Award In Coaching Bowls (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Cricket (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Cycling (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Fives (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Football (QCF) 24,821 24, % Level 1 Award in Coaching Gymnastics (Acrobatic Gym) (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Gymnastics (Aerobic Gym) (QCF) % SAR 2015 Page 114 of 147

124 Qualification title Number of registered learners Change ( ) Count % Level 1 Award in Coaching Gymnastics (General) (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Gymnastics (Men's Artistic) (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Gymnastics (Men's Artistic) (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Gymnastics (Pre-School) (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Gymnastics (Rhythmic) (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Gymnastics (Team Gym) (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Gymnastics (Trampolining) (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Gymnastics (Tumbling) (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Gymnastics (Women's Artistic) (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Gymnastics (Women's Artistic) (QCF) N/A Level 1 Award in Coaching Hockey (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Judo (QCF) N/A Level 1 Award In Coaching Lacrosse (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Netball (QCF) 914 1, % Level 1 Award in Coaching Orienteering (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Parkour/ Freerunning (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Rounders (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Rugby League (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Rugby Union (QCF) 2,716 2, % Level 1 Award In Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Table Tennis (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Tennis (QCF) 2,238 1, % Level 1 Award in Coaching Triathlon (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Volleyball (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Weight Lifting (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Wrestling (QCF) % Level 1 Award in the Principles of Coaching Sport (QCF) % Level 1 Award In Using Sport to Tackle Youth Crime (QCF) % SAR 2015 Page 115 of 147

125 Qualification title Number of registered learners Change ( ) Count % Level 1 Certificate in Coaching Football (Overseas Delivery) N/A Level 1 Certificate in Preparation for Event Volunteering (QCF) % Level 1 Diploma in Work Based Horse Care (QCF) N/A Level 1 Diploma in Work Based Racehorse Care and Riding (QCF) N/A Level 1 NVQ Award in Sport and Active Leisure (QCF) % Level 2 Award in Emergency First Aid at Work (QCF) N/A Level 2 Award in Employment Awareness in Active Leisure and Learning (QCF) % Level 2 Award in Employment Awareness in the Outdoors (QCF) % Level 2 Award in First Aid for Sport (QCF) % Level 2 Award in Instructing Weight Lifting (QCF) N/A Level 2 Award In Introductory Work in the Outdoors (QCF) % Level 2 Award in Leadership through Football (QCF) % Level 2 Award In Leadership through Gymnastics (QCF) N/A Level 2 Award in Leadership through Rugby Union (QCF) % Level 2 Award In Multi-Skills Development in Sport (QCF) 955 1, % Level 2 Award In Refereeing Rugby League (QCF) N/A Level 2 Award in Sessional Hockey Coaching (QCF) N/A Level 2 Award in the Principles of Coaching Sport (QCF) % Level 2 Award in the Treatment and Management of Injury in Sport (QCF) % Level 2 Award in Understanding Stewarding at Spectator Events (QCF) % Level 2 Award in Understanding the Active Leisure and Learning Sector (QCF) % Level 2 Award In Using Sport to Tackle Youth Crime (QCF) N/A Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Angling (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Badminton (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Basketball (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Boccia (QCF) N/A Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Bowls (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Cable Wakeboarding (QCF) % SAR 2015 Page 116 of 147

126 Qualification title Number of registered learners Change ( ) Count % Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Children s Cricket (QCF) 1,003 1, % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Cricket (Overseas Delivery) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Cricket (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Cycling (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Fives (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Football (QCF) 5,701 5, % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (Acrobatic Gym) (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (Aerobic Gym) (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (General) (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (Men's Artistic) (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (Pre-School) (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (Rhythmic) (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (Team Gym) (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (Trampolining) (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (Tumbling) (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (Women's Artistic) (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Handball (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Hockey (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Hockey (QCF) N/A Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Judo (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Lacrosse (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Netball (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Orienteering (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Parkour/Freerunning (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Performance Motor Sport (QCF) N/A Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Rounders (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Rowing (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Rugby League (QCF) % SAR 2015 Page 117 of 147

127 Qualification title Number of registered learners Change ( ) Count % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Rugby Union (QCF) 2,694 2, % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Squash and Racketball (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Table Tennis (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Tennis (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Triathlon (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Volleyball (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Water Skiing/Wakeboarding (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Weight Lifting (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Wrestling (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Young People and Adults Cricket (QCF) 1,082 1, % Level 2 Certificate In Introductory Work in the Outdoors (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Leisure Operations (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Supporting Learning in Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in the Principles and Preparations for Coaching Sport (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate In the Principles of Horse Care (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate In the Structure of the Horseracing Industry (QCF) N/A Level 2 Diploma in Coaching Tennis (QCF) N/A Level 2 Diploma in Work Based Racehorse Care (QCF) Breeding N/A Level 2 Diploma in Work Based Racehorse Care (QCF) Riding N/A Level 2 Diploma in Work Based Racehorse Care (QCF) Specialist Racehorse Care N/A Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Active Leisure, Learning and Well-being Operational Services (QCF) % Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Activity Leadership (QCF) % Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Spectator Safety (QCF) % Level 3 Award In Assessing Competence in the Work Environment (QCF) % Level 3 Award In Assessing Vocationally Related Achievement (QCF) % Level 3 Award in Delivering Learning (QCF) % Level 3 Award in Education and Training (QCF) % SAR 2015 Page 118 of 147

128 Qualification title Number of registered learners Change ( ) Count % Level 3 Award in Employment Awareness in Active Leisure and Learning (QCF) % Level 3 Award in the Principles of Coaching Sport (QCF) % Level 3 Award in the Principles of Transporting Horses by Road on Short Journeys (QCF) N/A Level 3 Award in the Principles of Transporting Horses on Long Journeys (Attendant) (QCF) N/A Level 3 Award in the Principles of Transporting Horses on Long Journeys (Attendant/Driver) (QCF) N/A Level 3 Award in Workforce Mentoring (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (Basketball) (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (Handball) (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (QCF) N/A Level 3 Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (Rowing) (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Assessing Vocational Achievement (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Assessing Vocational Achievement (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Badminton (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Basketball (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Cricket (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (Acrobatic Gym) (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (Trampolining) (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (Tumbling) (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (Women's Artistic) (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Hockey (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Judo (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Mountain Biking (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Netball (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Road and Time Trial Cycling (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Rowing (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Rugby League (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Rugby Union (QCF) % SAR 2015 Page 119 of 147

129 Qualification title Number of registered learners Change ( ) Count % Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Squash (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Table Tennis (QCF) N/A Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Tennis (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Track Cycling (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Triathlon (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Wakeboarding (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Water Skiing (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Employment Awareness in the Outdoors (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Leisure Management (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Managing Sports Volunteers (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Supporting the Delivery of Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Talented Athlete Lifestyle Support (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in the Principles of Horse Care and Management (QCF) N/A Level 3 Certificate in the Treatment and Management of Injury in Sport (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Thoroughbred Stud Practice (QCF) N/A Level 3 Certificate in Understanding Sports Performance (Basketball) (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Understanding Sports Performance (Handball) (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Understanding Sports Performance (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Understanding Sports Performance (Rowing) (QCF) % Level 3 Diploma in Coaching Tennis (QCF) % Level 3 Diploma in Farriery - Work Based (QCF) N/A Level 3 Diploma in Work Based Racehorse Care and Management (QCF) Breeding N/A Level 3 Diploma in Work Based Racehorse Care and Management (QCF) Exercise Riding N/A Level 3 Diploma in Work Based Racehorse Care and Management (QCF) Race Riding N/A Level 3 Diploma in Work Based Racehorse Care and Management (QCF) Specialist Racehorse Care % Level 3 Diploma in Work Based Racehorse Care and Management (QCF) Training the Young Horse N/A Level 3 NVQ Certificate in Spectator Safety (QCF) % SAR 2015 Page 120 of 147

130 Qualification title Number of registered learners Change ( ) Count % Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (QCF) % Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Leisure Management (QCF) % Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Outdoor Programmes (QCF) (via the Outdoor Education Pathway) % Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Outdoor Programmes (QCF) (via the Outdoor Recreation Pathway) % Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Sports Development (QCF) % Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Supporting the Delivery of Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) % Level 3 NVQ in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (Handball) % Level 4 Award In the Internal Quality Assurance of Assessment Processes and Practice (QCF) % Level 4 NVQ Diploma in Spectator Safety Management (QCF) % SVQ 3 in Leisure Management at SCQF Level % 65,866 69,894 4,028 6% Table A9.1 1st4sport trends in learner registrations per qualification ( ) SAR 2015 Page 121 of 147

131 1st4sport trends in learner certifications per qualification ( ) Qualification Number of certificated learners Change ( ) Count % Entry Level Award in Assisting with Basic Care of Horses (Entry 2) (QCF) N/A Entry Level Award in Basic Knowledge of the Horseracing Industry (Entry 3) (QCF) N/A Functional Skills Qualification in English at Level % Functional Skills Qualification in English at Level N/A Functional Skills Qualification in Mathematics at Level % Functional Skills Qualification in Maths at Level N/A Level 1 Award in an Introduction to the Horseracing Industry (QCF) N/A Level 1 Award In Coaching Angling (QCF) % Level 1 Award In Coaching Archery (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Badminton (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Basketball (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Boccia (QCF) % Level 1 Award In Coaching Bowls (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Cricket (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Cycling (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Fives (QCF) N/A Level 1 Award in Coaching Football (QCF) 23,816 22, % Level 1 Award in Coaching Gymnastics (Acrobatic Gym) (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Gymnastics (Aerobic Gym) (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Gymnastics (General) (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Gymnastics (Men's Artistic) (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Gymnastics (Pre-School) (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Gymnastics (Rhythmic) (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Gymnastics (Team Gym) (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Gymnastics (Trampolining) (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Gymnastics (Tumbling) (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Gymnastics (Women's Artistic) (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Hockey (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Judo (QCF) N/A SAR 2015 Page 122 of 147

132 Qualification Number of certificated learners Change ( ) Count % Level 1 Award In Coaching Lacrosse (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Netball (QCF) 795 1, % Level 1 Award in Coaching Orienteering (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Parkour/ Freerunning (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Rounders (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Rugby League (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Rugby Union (QCF) 2,387 2, % Level 1 Award in Coaching Squash (QCF) % Level 1 Award In Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Table Tennis (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Tennis (QCF) 2,034 2, % Level 1 Award in Coaching Triathlon (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Volleyball (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Weight Lifting (QCF) % Level 1 Award in Coaching Wrestling (QCF) % Level 1 Award in the Principles of Coaching Sport (QCF) % Level 1 Award In Using Sport to Tackle Youth Crime (QCF) % Level 1 Certificate in Preparation for Event Volunteering (QCF) % Level 1 Diploma in Work Based Horse Care (QCF) N/A Level 1 Diploma in Work Based Racehorse Care and Riding (QCF) N/A Level 1 NVQ Award in Sport and Active Leisure (QCF) % Level 2 Award in Employment Awareness in Active Leisure and Learning (QCF) % Level 2 Award in Employment Awareness in the Outdoors (QCF) % Level 2 Award in First Aid for Sport (QCF) % Level 2 Award in Instructing Weight Lifting (QCF) N/A Level 2 Award In Introductory Work in the Outdoors (QCF) % Level 2 Award in Leadership through Football (QCF) % Level 2 Award In Leadership through Gymnastics (QCF) N/A Level 2 Award in Leadership through Rugby Union (QCF) % Level 2 Award In Multi-Skills Development in Sport (QCF) 911 1, % SAR 2015 Page 123 of 147

133 Qualification Number of certificated learners Change ( ) Count % Level 2 Award in Sessional Hockey Coaching (QCF) N/A Level 2 Award in the Principles of Coaching Sport (QCF) % Level 2 Award in the Treatment and Management of Injury in Sport (QCF) % Level 2 Award in Understanding Stewarding at Spectator Events (QCF) % Level 2 Award in Understanding the Active Leisure and Learning Sector (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Angling (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Badminton (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Basketball (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Bowls (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Cable Wakeboarding (QCF) N/A Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Children s Cricket (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Cricket (Overseas Delivery) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Cricket (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Cycling % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Cycling (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Fives (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Football (QCF) 4,287 4, % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (Acrobatic Gym) (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (Aerobic Gym) (QCF) N/A Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (General) (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (Men's Artistic) (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (Pre-School) (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (Rhythmic) (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (Team Gym) (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (Trampolining) (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (Tumbling) (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (Women's Artistic) (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Handball (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Hockey (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Hockey (QCF) N/A SAR 2015 Page 124 of 147

134 Qualification Number of certificated learners Change ( ) Count % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Judo (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Lacrosse (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Netball (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Orienteering (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Parkour/Freerunning (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Performance Motor Sport (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Rounders (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Rowing (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Rugby League (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Rugby Union (QCF) 2,225 2, % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Squash (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Squash and Racketball (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Table Tennis (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Tennis (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Triathlon (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Volleyball (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Water Skiing/Wakeboarding (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Weight Lifting (QCF) N/A Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Wrestling (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Young People and Adults Cricket (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate In Introductory Work in the Outdoors (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Leisure Operations (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate In Leisure Operations (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in Supporting Learning in Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate in the Principles and Preparations for Coaching Sport (QCF) % Level 2 Certificate In the Principles of Horse Care (QCF) N/A Level 2 Certificate In the Structure of the Horseracing Industry (QCF) N/A Level 2 Diploma In Coaching Learn to Swim (QCF) % Level 2 Diploma In Coaching Learn to Swim (QCF) % SAR 2015 Page 125 of 147

135 Qualification Number of certificated learners Change ( ) Count % Level 2 Diploma in Coaching Tennis (QCF) % Level 2 Diploma in Work Based Racehorse Care (QCF) Breeding N/A Level 2 Diploma in Work Based Racehorse Care (QCF) Riding N/A Level 2 Diploma in Work Based Racehorse Care (QCF) Specialist Racehorse Care N/A Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Active Leisure, Learning and Well-being Operational Services (QCF) % Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Activity Leadership (QCF) % Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Spectator Safety (QCF) % Level 3 Award In Assessing Competence in the Work Environment (QCF) % Level 3 Award In Assessing Vocationally Related Achievement (QCF) % Level 3 Award In Delivering Learning (QCF) % Level 3 Award in Delivering Learning (QCF) % Level 3 Award in Education and Training (QCF) % Level 3 Award in Employment Awareness in Active Leisure and Learning (QCF) % Level 3 Award In Preparing to Teach in the Lifelong Learning Sector (QCF) % Level 3 Award in the Principles of Coaching Sport (QCF) % Level 3 Award in the Principles of Transporting Horses by Road on Short Journeys (QCF) N/A Level 3 Award in the Principles of Transporting Horses on Long Journeys (Attendant) (QCF) N/A Level 3 Award in the Principles of Transporting Horses on Long Journeys (Attendant/Driver) (QCF) N/A Level 3 Award in Workforce Mentoring (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (Rowing) (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (QCF) N/A Level 3 Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (Handball) (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (Basketball) (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Assessing Vocational Achievement (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Assessing Vocational Achievement (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Badminton (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Basketball (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Cricket (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (Acrobatic Gym) (QCF) % SAR 2015 Page 126 of 147

136 Qualification Number of certificated learners Change ( ) Count % Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (Trampolining) (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (Tumbling) (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (Women's Artistic) (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Hockey (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Judo (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Mountain Biking (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Netball (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Road and Time Trial Cycling (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Rowing (QCF) N/A Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Rugby League (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Rugby Union (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Squash (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Table Tennis (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Tennis (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Track Cycling (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Triathlon (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Coaching Wakeboarding (QCF) N/A Level 3 Certificate in Employment Awareness in the Outdoors (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Leisure Management (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate In Managing Sports Volunteers (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Supporting the Delivery of Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Talented Athlete Lifestyle Support (QCF) N/A Level 3 Certificate in the Principles of Horse Care and Management (QCF) N/A Level 3 Certificate in the Treatment and Management of Injury in Sport (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in the Treatment and Management of Injury in Sport (QCF) N/A Level 3 Certificate In Thoroughbred Stud Practice (QCF) N/A Level 3 Certificate in Understanding Sports Performance (Basketball) (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Understanding Sports Performance (Handball) (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Understanding Sports Performance (QCF) N/A SAR 2015 Page 127 of 147

137 Qualification Number of certificated learners Change ( ) Count % Level 3 Certificate in Understanding Sports Performance (QCF) % Level 3 Certificate in Understanding Sports Performance (Rowing) (QCF) % Level 3 Diploma in Coaching Tennis (QCF) N/A Level 3 Diploma in Farriery-Work Based (QCF) N/A Level 3 Diploma in Work Based Racehorse Care and Management (QCF) Race Riding N/A Level 3 Diploma in Work Based Racehorse Care and Management (QCF) Breeding N/A Level 3 Diploma in Work Based Racehorse Care and Management (QCF) Training the Young Horse N/A Level 3 Diploma in Work Based Racehorse Care and Management (QCF) Specialist Racehorse Care N/A Level 3 Diploma in Work Based Racehorse Care and Management (QCF) Exercise Riding N/A Level 3 NVQ Certificate in Spectator Safety (QCF) % Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (Basketball) (QCF) % Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (QCF) % Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Leisure Management (QCF) % Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Outdoor Programmes (QCF) (via the Outdoor Education Pathway) % Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Outdoor Programmes (QCF) (via the Outdoor Recreation Pathway) % Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Sports Development (QCF) % Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Supporting the Delivery of Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) % Level 3 NVQ in Achieving Excellence in Sports Performance (Handball) % Level 4 Award In the Internal Quality Assurance of Assessment Processes and Practice (QCF) % Level 4 NVQ Diploma in Spectator Safety Management (QCF) N/A SVQ 3 in Leisure Management at SCQF Level % Total 57,198 59,789 2,591 5% Table A9.2 1st4sport trends in learner certifications per qualification ( ) SAR 2015 Page 128 of 147

138 Results from the enquiries analysis show an indication of how people hear about 1stsport, our qualifications and the effectiveness of our marketing tools to increase our brand awareness in the industry. Responses of enquirers as to how they heard about 1st4sport (2015) County Sports Partnership 4% Other 7% Governing body of sport 14% External Verifier 3% Colleague 19% 1st4sport Qualifications Mailing/Flyer 2% Search engine (e.g. Google) 2% 1st4sport Qualifications 1% Website 28% Word of mouth 20% Chart A9.1 Analysis of effectiveness of marketing tools contributing towards 1st4sport s brand awareness. Website Word of mouth Colleague Governing body of sport Other County Sports Partnership External Verifier 1st4sport Qualifications Mailing/Flyer Search engine (e.g. Google) 1st4sport Qualifications Governing body of sport 8% External Verifier 10% Responses of enquirers as to how they heard about about specific 1st4sport qualifications (2015) 1st4sport Qualifications 6% Other 6% Colleague 10% 1st4sport Qualifications Mailing/Flyer 5% Word of mouth 12% County Sports Partnership 1% Search engine (e.g. Google) 1% Chart A9.2 Analysis of effectiveness of tools for the marketing of 1st4sport qualifications. An overview of the volume of recognition and approval applications received and outcomes is provided in table A9.3. A further analysis of the qualifications that organisations applied for as part of centre recognition and also existing recognised centres that applied as part of the qualification approval is provided in tables A9.4 and A9.5 respectively. Website 41% Conference 0.1% Website Word of mouth Colleague External Verifier Governing body of sport Other 1st4sport Qualifications 1st4sport Qualifications Mailing/Flyer County Sports Partnership Search engine (e.g. Google) Conference SAR 2015 Page 129 of 147

139 Overview of centre recognition and qualification approval applications received and related outcomes ( ) Centre Recognition Applications Number (2015) Number (2014) Qualification Approval Applications Number (2015) Number (2014) Successful applications Successful applications Pending applications Pending applications Declined applications 3 2 Declined applications 3 5 Total applications received Total applications received Total recognised* Total approved* Table A9.3 Overview of centre recognition and qualification approval applications received and related outcomes (2015) *This includes new recognised centres and qualification approval statuses granted automatically due to centre s eligibility. Declined applications were due to centre s/organisation s decision not to progress with their application and/or failure of being able meet workforce criteria. Number of approval applications received per qualification as part of centre recognition applications (2015) Qualification Number Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Supporting the Delivery of Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) (L3NVQPESS) 12 Level 1 Award in Coaching Weight Lifting (QCF) (L1ACWLQ) 5 Level 3 Certificate in Supporting the Delivery of Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) (L3CPESS) 5 Level 1 Award in Coaching Football (QCF) (L1ACFQ) 4 Level 1 Award in Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) (L1ACSCQ) 2 Level 1 Award in Coaching Tennis (QCF) (L1ACTENQ) 2 Level 2 Certificate in the Principles and Preparations for Coaching Sport (QCF) (L2PPCS) 2 Level 3 Award in Education and Training (QCF) (L3AE&TQ) 2 Level 4 NVQ Diploma in Spectator Safety Management (QCF) (L4NDSS) 2 Entry Level Award in Assisting with Basic Care of Horses (Entry 2) (QCF) (E2ABCHQ) 1 Level 1 Award in the Principles for Coaching Sport (QCF) (L1POCS) 1 Level 2 Award in Multi-Skills Development in Sport (QCF) (L2AMDSQ) 1 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Motor Sport (QCF) (L2CCMSQ) 1 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) (L2CCSCQ) 1 Level 2 Certificate in Supporting Learning in Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) (L2CSLPESSQ) 1 Level 2 Certificate in the Principles of Horse Care (QCF) (L2CPHQ) 1 Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Activity Leadership (QCF) (L2NVQALQ) 1 Level 3 Certificate in Talented Athlete Lifestyle Support (QCF) (L3CTALSQ) 1 Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Activity Leadership (QCF) (L2NVQALQ) 1 Total 45 Table A9.4 Applications for qualification approval submitted by organisations that wish to obtain centre recognition SAR 2015 Page 130 of 147

140 Applications were related 18 qualifications for centre recognition 57 qualifications for qualification approval. However, these figures do not include data which has not resulted from a submitted form in Athena. Number of approval applications received per qualification (2015) Qualification Number Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Supporting the Delivery of Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) (L3NVQPESS) 22 Functional Skills Qualification in English at Level 1 (L1ENG) 18 Level 3 Award in Employment Awareness in Active Leisure and Learning (QCF) (L3EAALL) 14 Level 2 Certificate in Supporting Learning in Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) (L2CSLPESSQ) 13 Level 2 Award in Employment Awareness in Active Leisure and Learning (QCF) (L2EAALL) 12 Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Activity Leadership (QCF) (L2NVQALQ) 12 Level 3 Certificate in Supporting the Delivery of Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) (L3CPESS) 11 Functional Skills Qualification in Maths at Level 2 (L2MATH) 10 Functional Skills Qualification in Mathematics at Level 1 (L1MATH) 8 Level 3 Award in Education and Training (QCF) (L3AE&TQ) 8 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Football (QCF) (L2CCFQ) 7 Level 3 Certificate in Assessing Vocational Achievement (QCF) (L3CAVAQ) 7 Level 2 Award in Multi-Skills Development in Sport (QCF) (L2AMDSQ) 6 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) (L2CCSCQ) 6 Level 3 Award in Assessing Vocationally Related Achievement (QCF) (L3AAVRAQ) 6 Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Sports Development (QCF) (L3DSD) 6 Level 4 Award In the Internal Quality Assurance of Assessment Processes and Practice (QCF) (L4AIQAQ) 6 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Weight Lifting (QCF) (L2CCWLQ) 5 Level 2 Certificate in the Principles and Preparations for Coaching Sport (QCF) (L2PPCS) 5 Level 1 Award in Coaching Football (QCF) (L1ACFQ) 4 Level 1 Award in Coaching Football (QCF) (L1ACFQ) 4 Level 2 Award in Instructing Weight Lifting (QCF) (L2AIWLQ) 4 Level 2 Award in the Principles for Coaching Sport (QCF) (L2POC) 4 Level 3 Award in Workforce Mentoring (QCF) (L3AWMQ) 4 Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) (L3CCSCQ) 4 Level 1 Award in Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) (L1ACSCQ) 3 Level 1 Award in the Principles for Coaching Sport (QCF) (L1POCS) 3 Level 2 Award in Leadership through Football (QCF) (L2ALTF) 3 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Basketball (QCF) (L2CCBBQ) 3 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Tennis (QCF) (L2CCTENQ) 3 Level 3 Award in Assessing Competence in the Work Environment (QCF) (L3AACWEQ) 3 SAR 2015 Page 131 of 147

141 Qualification Number Level 3 Award in Delivering Learning (QCF) 2013 (L3ADLQ2) 3 Level 3 Certificate in Managing Sports Volunteers (QCF) (L3CMSVQ) 3 Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Leisure Management (QCF) (L3DLMQ) 3 Level 1 Award in Coaching Weight Lifting (QCF) (L1ACWLQ) 2 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Volleyball (QCF) (L2CCVBQ) 2 Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Tennis (QCF) (L3CCTENQ) 2 Level 3 Certificate in Leisure Management (QCF) (L3CLMQ) 2 Level 3 Certificate in the Principles of Horse Care and Management (QCF) (L3CPHMQ) 2 Level 3 NVQ Certificate in Spectator Safety (QCF) (L3NCSS) 2 Level 1 Award in Coaching Basketball (QCF) (L1ACBBQ) 1 Level 1 Award in Coaching Rounders (QCF) (L1ACRONQ) 1 Level 2 Award in Employment Awareness in the Outdoors (QCF) (L2AEAOQ) 1 Level 2 Award in First Aid for Sport (QCF) (L2AFASQ) 1 Level 2 Award in Leadership through Gymnastics (QCF) (L2ALTGQ) 1 Level 2 Award in Leadership through Rugby Union (QCF) (L2ALTRU) 1 Level 2 Award in Using Sport to Tackle Youth Crime (QCF) (L2ASTCQ) 1 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Boccia (QCF) (L2CCBOCQ) 1 Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Rounders (QCF) (L2CCRONQ) 1 Level 2 Certificate in Leisure Operations (QCF) (2013) (L2CLOQ2) 1 Level 2 Certificate in the Principles of Horse Care (QCF) (L2CPHQ) 1 Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Active Leisure, Learning and Well-being Operational Services (QCF) (L2OPS) 1 Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Spectator Safety (QCF) (L2NCSSQ) 1 Level 3 Award in the Principles for Coaching Sport (QCF) (L3POCS) 1 Level 3 Certificate in Thoroughbred Stud Practice (QCF) (L3CTSPQ) 1 Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Outdoor Programmes (QCF) (via the Outdoor Recreation Pathway) 1 Level (L3DOPOR) 4 NVQ Diploma in Spectator Safety Management (QCF) (L4NDSS) 1 SVQ 3 in Leisure Management at SCQF Level 7 (SVQ3LM) 1 Total 259 Table A9.5 Applications submitted by 1st4sport recognised centres for qualification approval SAR 2015 Page 132 of 147

142 An analysis across the spread and type of incidents showed that 67 incidents were successfully managed, in relation to 111 qualifications. Number of incidents per qualification (2015) Qualification Count Percentage Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Football (QCF) (L2CCFQ) 15 14% Level 3 Award in Employment Awareness in Active Leisure and Learning (QCF) (L3EAALL) 8 7% Level 1 Award in Coaching Football (QCF) (L1ACFQ) 7 6% Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Supporting the Delivery of Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) (L3NVQPESS) 6 5% Level 2 Certificate in Supporting Learning in Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) (L2CSLPESSQ) 5 5% Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Strength and Conditioning for Sport (QCF) (L2CCSCQ) 4 4% Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Activity Leadership (QCF) (L2NVQALQ) 4 4% Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Tennis (QCF) (L3CCTENQ) 4 4% Level 3 NVQ Diploma in Sports Development (QCF) (L3DSD) 4 4% Level 1 Award in Coaching Tennis (QCF) (L1ACTENQ) 3 3% Level 2 Award in Employment Awareness in Active Leisure and Learning (QCF) (L2EAALL) 3 3% Level 2 Award in Multi-Skills Development in Sport (QCF) (L2AMDSQ) 3 3% Level 2 Certificate in the Principles and Preparations for Coaching Sport (QCF) (L2PPCS) 3 3% Level 3 Certificate in Managing Sports Volunteers (QCF) (L3CMSVQ) 3 3% Functional Skills Qualification in English at Level 2 (L2ENG) 2 2% Functional Skills Qualification in Mathematics at Level 1 (L1MATH) 2 2% Functional Skills Qualification in Maths at Level 2 (L2MATH) 2 2% Level 1 Award in Fire Safety Awareness (QCF) (L1AFSAQ) 2 2% Level 1 Certificate in Preparation for Event Volunteering (QCF) (L1CPEVQ) 2 2% Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Basketball (QCF) (L2CCBBQ) 2 2% Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Tennis (QCF) (L2CCTENQ) 2 2% Level 2 NVQ Certificate in Spectator Safety (QCF) (L2NCSSQ) 2 2% Level 3 Award in the Principles for Coaching Sport (QCF) (L3POCS) 2 2% Level 3 NVQ Certificate in Spectator Safety (QCF) (L3NCSS) 2 2% Level 4 NVQ Diploma in Spectator Safety Management (QCF) (L4NDSS) 2 2% Functional Skills Qualification in English at Level 1 (L1ENG) 1 1% Level 1 Award in Coaching Basketball (QCF) (L1ACBBQ) 1 1% SAR 2015 Page 133 of 147

143 Qualification Count Percentage Level 1 Award in Coaching Gymnastics (General) (QCF) (L1ACGGQ) 1 1% Level 1 Award in Coaching Netball (QCF) (L1ACNBQ) 1 1% Level 1 Award in Coaching Weight Lifting (QCF) (L1ACWLQ) 1 1% Level 1 Award in the Principles for Coaching Sport (QCF) (L1POCS) 1 1% Level 2 Award in Leadership through Football (QCF) (L2ALTF) 1 1% Level 2 Award in Leadership through Rugby Union (QCF) (L2ALTRU) 1 1% Level 2 Award in the Principles for Coaching Sport (QCF) (L2POC) 1 1% Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Badminton (QCF) (L2CCBADQ) 1 1% Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Football (L2CCF07) 1 1% Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Gymnastics (Women's Artistic) (QCF) (L2CCGWAQ) 1 1% Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Hockey (QCF) (L2CCHQ) 1 1% Level 2 Certificate in Coaching Rowing (QCF) (Sliding) (L2CCROWQ) 1 1% Level 2 Certificate In Coaching Table Tennis (QCF) (L2CCTTQ) 1 1% Level 3 Certificate in Coaching Table Tennis (QCF) (L3CCTTQ) 1 1% Level 3 Certificate in Supporting the Delivery of Physical Education and School Sport (QCF) (L3CPESS) 1 1% Total % Table A9.6 Analysis of incidents per qualification An analysis of the type of incidents showed that the majority of incidents which fall into the other category (20%) was primarily related to recognised centre ceasing to trade and also due to individuals committing forgery and using fraudulent certificates to seek employment. Type of incidents (2015) Learner appeal against their centre 9% Learner complaint against their centre 11% Other 20% Chart A9.3 Analysis of incident types Customer service complaint to 1st4sport from a centre 4% Suspected learner misconduct 3% EV reported sanction against a centre 27% Suspected non- by a centre 26% EV reported sanction against a centre Suspected non- by a centre Other Learner complaint against their centre Learner appeal against their centre Customer service complaint to 1st4sport from a centre Suspected learner misconduct SAR 2015 Page 134 of 147

144 Actions and Recognised Centre Risk Profile The table below show an analysis of the actions imposed on centres related to the delivery of specific qualifications. This is as a result of the identification of areas of non- through the different types of our monitoring activity in line with our risk management process. Number of actions across qualifications (2015) Qualification Count Qualification Count Qualification Count Qualification Count Qualification Count Qualification Count L3NVQPESS 180 L3POCS 12 L2CCCCRQ 6 L2AFASQ 3 L3TMIQ 2 L2CCWQ 1 L2NVQALQ 163 L2CCBADQ 11 L2CCCQ 6 L2CCBOWLS 3 L1AACB 1 L2CFCB 1 L1ACFQ 133 L2OPS 11 L2CCHBQ 6 L2CCPAMSQ 3 L1ACGACGQ 1 L2CPHQ 1 L2EAALL 104 L2TMIQ 11 L2CCTENQ 6 L2CCPEMSQ 3 L1ACGAGQ 1 L2DWBRBQ 1 L2CSLPESSQ 98 L3CAVAQ 11 L3AAVRAQ 6 L2ENG 3 L1ACGGQ 1 L2DWBRQ 1 L2PPCS 80 L1ACRLQ 10 L3CCSCQ 6 L2NCSSQ 3 L1ACGMAQ 1 L2DWBRSQ 1 L2CCFQ 75 L2ALTRU 10 L3DFQ 6 L3AACWEQ 3 L1ACGTGQ 1 L2YPACRQ 1 L3EAALL 62 L2CCBBQ 10 L4AIQAQ 6 L3CCRTTQ 3 L1ACGTQ 1 L3ATHSQ 1 L3CPESS 43 L3ADLQ2 10 L1ACBBQ 5 L3CCTENQ 3 L1ACPKQ 1 L3CAXHBQ 1 L2AMDSQ 39 SVQ3LM 10 L1ACVBQ 5 L3DCTENQ14 3 L1ACRONQ 1 L3CAXQ14 1 L3DSD 38 L2ALTF 9 L2ASHCQ 5 L3DWRCEQ 3 L1ACWQ 1 L3CAXROWQ 1 L2CCSCQ 36 L2CCGWAQ 9 L2CCSQRBQ 5 L3DWRCQ 3 L2AUSSE 1 L3CCBBQ 1 L2POCS 32 L2CCRLQ 9 L2CCTTQ 5 L1ACARCQ 2 L2CCAQ 1 L3CCSQQ 1 L2CLOQ2 24 L1ACBADQ 8 L3DOPOE 5 L1ACGPQ 2 L2CCGACGQ 1 L3CPHMQ 1 L1ACRUQ 19 L1ACWLQ 8 L1ACGTRQ 4 L1ACHQ 2 L2CCGAGQ 1 L3CTALSQ 1 L2CCRUQ 19 L2CCTRIQ 8 L1ACTRIQ 4 L1ACWL 2 L2CCGGQ 1 L3CTSPQ 1 L1POCS 18 L3CMSVQ 8 L1ACTTQ 4 L2AOWL 2 L2CCGMAQ 1 L3CUSPHBQ 1 L2AEAOQ 16 L1ACTENQ 7 L3CCROWQ 4 L2CCGTRQ 2 L2CCGPQ 1 L3CUSPQ14 1 L1ACSCQ 15 L2CCMSQ 7 L3CEAOQ 4 L2CCNBQ 2 L2CCGRQ 1 L3CUSPROWQ 1 L3CLMQ 15 L3CCRUQ 7 L1ACAQ 3 L2CCPKQ 2 L2CCGTGQ 1 L3DWRCBQ 1 L2CCHQ2 14 L3DOPOR 7 L1ACGWAQ 3 L2MATH 2 L2CCGTQ 1 L3DWRCRQ 1 L3DLMQ 13 L1ASAL 6 L1ASTCQ 3 L3AWMQ 2 L2CCRONQ 1 L3DWRCSQ 1 L3AE&TQ 12 L2AIWOQ 6 L1ENG 3 L3NCSS 2 L2CCWLQ 1 L3DWRCTQ 1 Total 1685 Table A9.7 Number of actions imposed on centres per qualification SAR 2015 Page 135 of 147

145 The total number of actions imposed on centres in 2015 is 1685 (895 actions in 2014, 683 actions in 2013, 479 actions in 2012 and 331 actions in 2011) related to 139 qualifications. The reason for the increase is partly due to a process change to enable a more robust monitoring and proactive approach to prevent any serious non- and/or potential adverse effects at an early stage (such as when reviewing applications for centre recognition and qualification approval). Minor discrepancies in the data, possible duplication of actions created in Athena and timescales of data collection may have had a slight impact on the validity of the data related to actions. Actions imposed on centres based upon the type of monitoring (2015) Visit to verify a cohort of learners 3% Recognition and approval 4% Visit to verify centre systems 3% Desk review of DCS after sanctions 2% Visit to verify DCS after sanctions 2% Desk review of a cohort of learners 1% Qualification approval 4% Desk review of first course (formative pre DCS) 1% Desk review of a course 6% Visit to verify first course (formative pre DCS) 7% Visit to verify a course 35% Desk review of first course (summative DCS review) 7% Visit to provide training and/or advice 8% Visit to verify first course (summative DCS review) 17% Chart A9.4 Analysis of actions imposed on centres in line with our risk management process on centre activity SAR 2015 Page 136 of 147

146 Level of actions imposed on centres (2015) Level 2: Medium risk 18% Level 3: High risk 2% Level 4: Very high risk 0.1% Level 1: Low risk Level 2: Medium risk Chart A9.5 Analysis of level of actions imposed on centres Level 1: Low risk 80% Level 3: High risk Level 4: Very high risk Implementation status of actions imposed on centres (2015) Open actions 29% Closed actions Closed actions 71% Open actions Chart A9.6 Analysis of action s implementation status by centres Despite the increase in the number of actions imposed on centres over the past years timescales in the implementation of these actions by centres has shown a significant improvement (incomplete actions in 2011 was 82%, 71% in 2012, 35% in 2013 and 37% in 2014). This is primarily due to improved process efficiency, the systematic monitoring by our EQAs and CEQAs, as well as centres effort to report the completion of an action via the creation of the Action Response Form on Athena (121 forms - largest number of forms submitted so far). SAR 2015 Page 137 of 147

147 Percentage Reasonable adjustment requests across qualifications (2015) 25% 20% 15% 10% 20% 15% 10% 10% 5% 0% 6% 6% 4% 4% 3% 3% 2% 2% 2% 2% 2% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% Chart A9.7 Analysis of requests for reasonable adjustments across qualifications Reasonable adjustment requests were related to 27 qualifications. Of the 113 requests only 5 were declined (4%); this was mainly due to learners inability and/or lack of evidence to meet the eligibility criteria. It is interesting to note that out of 968 reported disabilities only 113 requests for reasonable adjustments were submitted. Reasonable adjustments granted based on learner's needs (2015) Communication and interaction 6% Behavioural, emotional and social 4% Other 3% Cognition and learning Sensory and physical Communication and interaction Sensory and physical 31% Cognition and learning 56% Behavioural, emotional and social Other Chart A9.8 Analysis of requests for reasonable adjustments granted based on learner s needs SAR 2015 Page 138 of 147

148 Percentage Special consideration requests across qualifications (2015) 30% 25% 24% 23% 20% 15% 10% 5% 10% 5% 4% 3% 3% 3% 2% 2% 2% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 0% Chart A9.9 Analysis of requests for special considerations across qualifications Special consideration requests were related to 28 qualifications. However, 31 of 135 special consideration requests (23%) were not granted. This was primarily due to invalid rationale provided and/or lack of associated evidence to support learner s eligibility for special consideration. Special considerations granted based on learner's circumstances (2015) SC Alternative assessment arrangements, agreed in advance of the assessment, proved inappropriate or inadequate 16% SC Performance in an assessment is affected by circumstances beyond the control of the learner 14% Other 13% SC Part of an assessment has been missed due to circumstances beyond the control of the learner 57% SC Part of an assessment has been missed due to circumstances beyond the control of the learner SC Alternative assessment arrangements, agreed in advance of the assessment, proved inappropriate or inadequate SC Performance in an assessment is affected by circumstances beyond the control of the learner Other Chart A9.10 Analysis of requests for special considerations across qualifications SAR 2015 Page 139 of 147

149 Count The comparison of the external quality assurance (EQA) activity illustrated in chart A3.5 provides an overview of the verification trends; a proportion of EQA activity against the events delivered. It must be noted that the verification target of courses/cohorts was changed in 2010 from 1:4 to 1:6 and from 1:50 to 1:75. In 2015 the decision was made to have qualification specific EQA targets to ensure robust monitoring. Based on the data from Athena 1,076 EQA activities took place in Trends in the total number of events delivered and verified (2015) 7,000 6,000 5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 1, ,948 5,007 5,054 5,231 5,320 5,285 4,760 4, ,143 1,174 1,140 1, Total number of events delivered Total number of events verified Year Chart A9.11 Trends in the volumes of external quality assurance activity Types of external quality assurance activity undertaken (2015) Visit to verify a cohort of learners 3% Desk review of first course 5% Desk review of a course 10% Visit to verify first course 20% Visit to verify centre systems 2% Desk review of DCS after sanctions 1% Desk review of a cohort of learners 1% Visit to provide training and/or advice 1% Visit to verify a course 56% Visit to verify DCS after sanctions 1% Chart A9.12 External quality assurance activity undertaken by type SAR 2015 Page 140 of 147

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