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1 losure Authorized Public Disclosure Authorized Public Disclosure Authorized Public Disclosure Authorized CD0) LO E~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ UJ o~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ >~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~ A~~~\ El

2 Untitled Document Page l of 2 `Protected'-areas maps [Maps index I Key in separate frame] Click on the protected areas to view the site cards in pdf format. Existing and proposed protected areas in Dac Lac province Cac khu bao v& hi&n c6 v& de xuat 6 dnh ESc Llc ang~ ~~FrngIa T -- 6nPla Thf2i6t - ' (&,-e * ikr6ng Ca H ' -!~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~M Vegetation type 1 Kie~u riong Legend I Chu giai * Evergreen forest!f Rifng lhutdng xanh, Pro1ecled area f Khu bbo ve * Coniferous forest! f lng ia kim - Provincial border!f Ranh giai linh, Deciduous foresi ( Ritng rying IA (khop) Osirici border!b Ranh giai huyen * Semi-deciduous forest/fring riia rung IA * P'{v"Qr * Limestone forest!{ Ring ni)i da a ~Q * Bamboo/fRingl1re nta * Plantalion forest ( Rirng lrongn K Grassland and scrub!f Oal lrong Agricullural land! f~ ndinng * Water bodies f Ma1 nujdc * Mangrove! RiSng ngap man * Metbaleuca ( Rirng tram 0eS.CI/t d a nghiep 4 3gP [ Maps index I Key in separate frame ] 14/11/03

3 Untitled Document Page 1 of 2 t Pr6tectedzareas maps % [Maps index I Key in separate frame ] Click on the protected areas to view the site cards in pdf format. Existing and proposed protected areas in Kon Tum province Cac khu bao vi hien c6 va de xuat a tinh Kon Tum NE ninr ic' 11 thij - :-< i 7 P a~~~"h i'ssea--t - ~~~~~~~~, S. 2 ]-1~~~~~~~~~~~~4 -g 7,v -Uit lap~gra!i;hxonllt ' < '3 "'L * Evrgren foeel{f hudn r an SahPoece NgKufbolv I 4110 * ki * *im/chtq t * Waler {*MallnhWa bodies lapjrra p ~~~ ~~~Y~ang, TXRib g Vegetation type)i Kie*u ru(ng inde~x Legend I Ch(j guii * Evergreen foresit! Ring fhufdng [ xanh Maps e n ea frame Protected area I Kh u bao ve 4] * Coniferous forest I Fing IA kim Provincial border!i Ranh gi6i1 tinth,~ Daciduous forest/rifwng rkyng I6 (khop - -- ljstihct border!i Ranh gial huytn Semi-deciduous foreslt / Rng n/ita rugng li Limestone forest! RIng nui d.1 Afrf *Bamboo'tRingtire ncfa *Plantation forest I Ring tr6ngn Grassland and scrub I Ekil trong Agricullural land I E61 n6ng nghigp 4 * WValer bodies I Mal nlfdc W * MAangrove! RIFng nghp mrn n * Melaleuca / Rng irbm- [ Maps index IKey in separate frame] /03

4 Untitled Document Page l of 2 - " Protected areas maps [ Maps index I Key in separate frame] Click on the protected areas to view the site cards in pdf format. Existing and proposed protected areas in Gia La! province Cac khu bao ve hien c6 v3 de xuat 8 tinh Gia Lai * Evergreen bn3bl! Fring fhuang xanhi ProleCsed area t Khu bso ve. * Coniferous foresl! ring la kim Provincial border!f Ranh gidi linh * Deciduous foresi r Ring rung la (khop) Dslricl border!{ Ranh gi6i huye n * Semi.deciduous foresil I Frin nita rung la n A * Limeslone foresl1 R Fing nui da CiC /9Q * Bamboo!{ Ring4,re ncta * Plan1a1ion fores1j Rltng lrongn U Grassland and scrub! ia1 1rongh AgriculluralI1and!Ea1 nong nghibp W * Waler bodies t- Ma. i nuadc l * Mangrov,e! RI ng ngap man S * Melaleuca I Fdtngra [Maps index I Key in separate frame ] 14/11/03

5 Untitled Document Page I of 2 ¾ P5rodtected areas maps [Maps index I Key in separate frame Click on the protected areas to view the site cards in pdf format. Existing and proposed protected areas in Quang Ngai province Cac khu lbao vi hien c6 va de xuaft 8 tinh Quang Ngai FS _, lincrn r. ) > Ck <....ri*s.4.. Fh SnTinlh H Da'-.b 23h~~~~~~~~~~ w <,_-,--% Ng.hI.\ TYflXhn Ng8i *tssza\e s& rr * o hhng( (a~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~i /~~~~~~ LS w t -i: a- 'a 4 4c 3 rae. ifv ihcw i _ i v s j. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Hn:iFhSn Vegetation type I Kieu rufng Legend I Chu gii * Evergreen forest / RFng lhudng raanh Prolecled area I Khu bho ve * Coniferous foresl I Ring lb kim Provincial border I Ranh gili tinh Deciduous forest R ing rung la (kh6p) sirici border I Ranh gidi huy6n Semi-deciduous forest r Ring nura rung ia * Limestone forest I Ring nui da / 4 (JCf ' etrc4? * ire nura Plantaiion forestz RIng tr 6 ng Grassland and scrub F 61 lr6ng Agricultural land f061 n6ng nghiip Bamboo I Ring * Waler bodies / Mal nldcc * Mangrove I (Rng ngap man * Melaleuca I Rng tram [ Maps index Key in separate frame] 14/11/03

6 Untitled Document Page I of 2 Protected areas maps [ Maps index I Key in separate frame] Click on the protected areas to view the site cards in pdf format. Existing and proposed protected areas in Quang Nam province Cac khu bao vi hien c6 va de xuat 8 tnh Quang Nam i a gu Ha nh Son 4 u F'l u Lao CAn(marine) s 2 ;l d <'~ c(ksy,sohn9 in, Al.~ ~~~~~V, - 3?d.a,.y -* X L TX.Tain,* >;_ Tinh i 3 g - t ',:R~~~~~wra'rT X ~~y FX '~~~~ S i d h H~h v~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~owha, Nght ~~~- ~ -N ~ ~ Vegetation typoe Kieu rutng Legend I Chu gli * Evergreen foresi ( Rung lhlfdng xanh Prolected area IK hu bao ve * Coniferous forest i Ring la kim Provincial border I Ranh gidi i nh Deciduous foresl I Rung ryng la (kh6p) - - Ci Dsiric border f Ranh gidi huy6n * Semi-deciduous foresi IRung nuta rung lia * Limeslone foreel / Rung nui da i * Bamboo Rung Ire nua * Planlalion fores I Rung lr6ng N Grassland and scrub I W1 irong Agriculiural land t Eal nong nghiip * Waler bodies Mal nlic * Mangrove I Wng ngap man 8 * Ielaleuca I Rung lram B [ Maps index I Kev in separate frame] 14/11/03

7 Untitled Document Page 1 of 2 'Protected areas maps [Maps index I Key in separate frame] Click on the protected areas to view the site cards in pdf format. r <1 Existing and proposed protected areas in Quang Tri province Cac khu bao vi hien c6 v de xuat 8 tinh Qu3ng Tri i'! at'i" L, DaoSernCo ':1 7' > t1 -, * V Linh - C,'~~~~ 'S. r G~~~~~io Unh i c~~~ai 4., Alh ohd.et+.~~~~~~--, 46u w.- w -'- a- v 4 \ -. 7 t >g><-* V6lQSnsH4> -m CamLO 4,jP[jfl,Qflg H )';-f 'aa- T ung. {: -_ ^ ;. # # ~~~~~~~~~~~~Phorfg idien Vegetation typeb I Ki&u ruing Legend /Ch(i gial1 *Evergreen forest / Rifng lhu6dng xanh Protected area I Khu bho v6!coniferous foreasi I Rijng ab kim Provi ncial border I Ra nth gi6i lin h D gcid uo us forest.' FRing rying IA (k h6p) -- Osirici border!t Ranh gi6i huy~n Semi-deciduous forest RIng nca ryng I Limestione forest I F ing n6i d n * 1 ChQia * EBamboolingtre nita N * Planilaion foresi f Ritng irfng * Grassland and scrub Is l r6ng 4l Aguicullural land I E al nong nghiep * Waler bodies I Ml nuac! Mangrove I Ring rgap rn~n [Maps index Key in separate frame] 14/11/03

8 Untitled Document Page 1 of 2 ; Protected ar^eas maps [Maps index I Key in separate frame I Click on the protected areas to view the site cards in pdf format. Existing and proposed protected areas in Quang Binh province Cic khu bao vi hien c6 va de xuat 8 tinh Qu3ng Binh _ Wo 4ll e &GojlSlt - o; j qui Qjngi Jr W h I La_4 Mnhel -o-. y'$v~:* ^+ i- - - h N S 1 4 B5Trach A. w~~~~~~~~~~ i. t.jr t.jag-unh Vegetation type I Kieu ritng Legend I Chu giai * Evergreen bresf RI ng Ihudng xanh Prolecled area I Khu bho ve * Coniferous foresi I wng la kim Provincial border! Ranh giai linh Deciduous fored! f ring rung la (kh6p) Osiricl border f Ranh giai huyen * Semi-deciduous foresl I ffng ntia ryng 1a * Limeslone foresi ( Rng nui da P PkvjcctrQP * Bamboo f RWnglre nuta * Plantation forest! RIng lr6ng N GraEsland and scrub I (al 1r6ng + Agricullural land I ii nong nghiep W 3 *Walor bodioc I Ma1 nudcjcw *Mangrove I Ring nghp man * Melaleuca f wrng Iram [Maps index I Key in separate frame ] 14/11/03

9 ELECTRICITY OF VIETNAM POWER COMPANY NO. 3 Feasibility Study Central Region Rural Energy Project PHASE 11 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT Volume 3 Prepared by: POWER COMPANY NO. 3 Danang, September 2003

10 Rural Enefgy I - Phase II Table of Contents Executive Summary..... i 1 Introduction Project Description Name of Project: Executing Agencies: Socio econornic Target of Project Main Features of the Project Project Schedule Project Cost.3 3 Policy, Legal, and Administrative Framework World Bank Policy on Environmental Asscssment Vietnamese Policy and Administrative Framework on Environmental Assessment Vietnamese Policy Framework Vietnamese Administrative Framework Baseline Conditions Project-Level Baseline Conditions The Socio-economic Environment The Natural Environment Provincial-Level Baseline Conditions QuangBinh QuangTri QuangNan QuangNgai GiaLai KonTum : DacLac.10 5 Analysis of Alternatives Alternatives to the Project Alternatives within the Project "No-Project" Alternative Analysis of Impacts Impact Assessment Methodology Summary of Impacts Pre-Construction Phase Impacts Project Affected Households - MITIGAEBLE IMACT Lands Acquisition - MITIGABLE IMPACT Impacts Caused by Clearing the ROW - MINOR NEGATIVE IMPACT Cultural Property - NO IMPACT Health Risks Related to Explosives, and Toxic Substances - MITIGABLE IMPACT Construction Phase Impacts Soil Erosion - MINOR NEGATIVE IMPACT Petroleum and Hazardous Waste Spills - MINOR IMPACT Temporary Loss of Productive Land - MINOR IM PACT Impacts of Temporary Access Roads - MITIGAEBLE IMACT Impacts on Noise and Dust - MITIGABLE IMPACT Environmental Impacts Caused Construction Workers - MITIGATED IMPACT Social Impacts Caused by Construction Workers - MINOR IMPACT Health and Safety- MITIGATED IMPACT Operations Phase Impacts Social Development and Poverty Alleviation - SIGNIFICANT POSITIVE Habitat Fragmentation -MINOR NEGATIVE Page i September 2003

11 Rural Energy I - Phase n Increased Access to Wildlands - MINOR IMPACT Health and Safetv - MITIGABLE Impact Avian and Aircraft Hazards - NOT SIGNIFICANT IMPACT Induced Effects from Electromagnetic Fields - NOT SIGNIFICANT Noise and Dust - NOT SIGNIFICANT Petroleum and Hazardous Waste Contamination - NOT SIGNIFICANT IMPACT Mitigation Measures for Negative Impacts Pre-Construction Phase Mitigation Measures Project Affected Households Land Acquisition Impacts Caused by Clearing the ROW Health Risks Related to Explosives and Toxic Substances Construction Phase Mitigation Measures Soil Erosion Petroleum and Hazardous Wastes Spills Temporary Loss of Productive Land Impact of Temporary Access Roads Noise and Dust Impacts Caused By Clearing the Right of Way Environmental Impacts Caused By Construction Workers Social Impacts Caused By Construction Workers Health and Safety Operation Phase Mitigation M easures Health and Safety Public Consultation and Disclosure The Need and Benefits of Public Consultation and Disclosure Public Consultation and Disclosure Activities during Pre-Construction Activity 1: Information & Discussion with Local Authonties on the Line Route Activity 2: Impact Sunrey and Statistics Activity 3: Meetings with PAHs Activity 4: Receiving Further Feedback from PAHs Activity 5: Approval and Clearance of the RAP Activity 6: Consultation and Clearance on EIA Public Consultation and Disclosure Activities during Construction and Operation Activity 1: Information Dissemination/Consultation for Local Authorities Activity 2: Information Dissemination/Consultation to PAHs.33 9 Environmental Management Plan Mitigation Plan Monitoring Plan Institutional Framework for Environmental Management Project Implementation Framework Project Monitoring of EMP Other EMP Stakeholders Environmental Reporting Procedures Capacity Building Cost of Implementing the EMP Annex 1: List of EA Report Preparers Al. I Central Region Rural Energy Project Management Board A1.2 Consultant Agencies Al.2.1 Power Engineering Consulting Company No.4 (PECC4) A1.2.2 Electrical Design Centre under Power Company No.3 (EDC-PC3) Al.2.3 Power Engineering and Investigating Enterprise under Power Engineering Consulting Company No.1 (PECC1) A WB Consultant Page ii September 2003

12 Categorv B EIA EVN and PC 3 Rural Enef,,y I - Phase 11 Annex 2: References A2. 1 Written Materials Both Published and Unpublished Used in Study Preparation.51 A2.2 Other Materials Annex 3: Record of Consultation Meetings.52 Annex 4: Relevant Data.53 A4.1 ScopeofProject Annex 5: Associated Project Reports and Project Implementation Schedule.56 A5. 1 List of Associated Reports..., 56 A5.2 Projcct Implementation Schedule.56 Annex 6: Resettlement Action Plan.57 A6. 1 Entitlement Mtrix.57 A6.2 Total Impacted Households..., 59 A6.3 Total Statistics on Land Acquisition of Project..., 63 Page iii September 2003

13 Rural Energy I - Phase H List of Tables Table El: Summary of impacts... vii Table 2.1: Main features of the Project Table 2.2: Summary of estimated project costs... I Table 6.1: Summary of Impacts Table 6.2: Impacts on Project Affected Households Table 6.3: Land Acquired for the Project Table 6.4: Magnetic field measurements of 1I 5, 230, and 500 KV transmission lines Table 6.5: TCVN 5949 (1998) Acoustics - Noise in public and residential areas: maximum permitted noise levels.22 Table 9.1: Pre-construction - potential negative impacts and mutigation measures Table 9.2: Construction - potential negative impacts and mitgation measures Table 9.3: Operation - potential negative impacts and mitigation measures Table 9.4: Summary of Project Mitigation Measures Table 9.5: Guide for Developing Monitoring During Pre-Construction, Construction, and Operation - 42 Table 9.6: Costs of Implementing the EMIP.49 List of Figures Figure 5.1: Simplified example of alignment options presented by Consultant to PC Page iv September 2003

14 Rural Energy I - Phase [I CPC Abbreviations Commune People Committee DoNRE Provincial Departments of Natural Resources and Environment DoSTE Department of Science, Technology, and Environment DPC District People Committee EIA Environmental Impact Assessment EMD Environmental Management Division EVN Electricity of Vietnam GOV Government of Vietnam IMC Independent Monitoring Consultant Km Kilometre KVA Kilovolt Ampere M/LV Medium/Low Voltage MoNRE Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment MoSTE Ministry of Science, Technology, and Environment PAH Project Affect Household PC3 Power Company No 3 PMU Project Management Unit POP Persistent Organic Pollutants PPC Provincial People's Committee PPS Provincial Power Services RAP Resettlement Action Plan REP Rural Energy Project ROW Right of wav T/L Transmission line WB World Bank Page v September 2003

15 Category B ELA EVN and PC 3 Rural Enefgy I - Phase II Background Executive Summary The objective of Rural Energy Project (REP) is to assist the Government of Vietnam to increase the electrification ratio in rural areas to achieve the electrification targets. These targets envisage provision of energy to 100% of the districts, 80% of the communes and 60% of the households by the year The goal of REP's Central Region activities is improve access to reliable electricity for 108,042 households. Bv improving access to electncitv, local people will, inter alia, experience improved livelihoods at home and in the workplace. The REP is subdivided into two phases: Phase I will support electrification of 64,725 households, and Phase II will support electrification of 43,317 households. Phase I began construction in 1999 Phase II (the "Project") is the focus of this EIA report. Implementation Schedule and Budget Project implementation for second Phase will occur between January 2003 to June The total investment for the project is estimated at about VND 350,000 million (equivalent US$ 22.7 million). Project Scope The Project will connect 86 communes and commune groups in seven provinces in the Central Region of Vietnam. These communes are located in four coastal provinces and three mountainous provinces of Central Vietnam (Quang Binh, Quang Tnr, Quang Nam, QuangNgai, GiaLai, KonTum and DakLak). There are 1,075 km of MV lines (35 kv and 22 kv), 860 km of LV lines (0.4 kv), 572 substations with total capacity of 21,705 KVA and 43,317 meters that will be constructed. Project implementation will occur between January 2003 and June The total investment for the project is estimated at about VND 350,000 million (equivalent US$ 22.7 million). Alternatives Alternatives to the Project: In order to have the best solution to supply the electricity to the project areas, some different alternatives such as small hydropower, wind energy, solar, energy, and diesel were considered. Based on this comparison, the construction of the electricity network and substations was considered most advantageous for the following reasons: * The national network-grid was already available; therefore it was most cost effective to add to the grid rather than to develop new energy sources; * A network is the most reliable method to serve communes across the region; and Alternatives such as solar, diesel or small hydro could service a much smaller group of beneficiaries, and the total cost of those small-scale initiatives is much greater than that of improving the existing grid system. Alternatives within the Project: For within the project, the following alternatives were considered: choice of optimal voltage of network, alignment of transmission and distribution lines, access routes for construction and operation, capacity of transformers, and location of substation. The choices for each consideration are presented within the main text of the EIA report, Page vi September 2003

16 Rural Encegy I - Phase II The "No Project"Alternative: If the "No Project" alternative was implemented, 43,317 households could not access the network for use of the electricitv. Some of Vietnam's poorest people in the country most remote areas will not likely have access to electricitv of any kind in the near future This will affect their chances of economic development and povertv alleviation, two pillars of Vietnamese development policv. Impacts An assessment of the Project's potential environmental impacts was conducted for pre-construction, construction and operation phases. The assessment evaluated a range of potential impacts that could occur as a result of the project. The selection of potential impacts for evaluation was based on site visits, discussions with Phase I staff, Department of Natural Resources and Environment, project affected people, reviewing relevant documents (e.g. World Bank's Environmental Assessment Sourcebook, World Bank's Safeguard Polices, Phase I Environmental Assessment Report, Feasibilitv Study). Table El provides a summary impacts evaluation of potential impacts that could be crcatcd by the Project's activities in the Central Region. Table El: Summary of impacts. Impact Title Impact Valuation Pre-Construction Phase Impacts Project Affected Households Mitigable Impact Land Acquisition Mitigable Impact Impacts Caused By Clearing the ROW Minor Negative Impact Cultural Property No Impact Health Risks Related to Explosives, and Toxic Substances Mitigable Impact Constr9uewion Phase Impacts Soil Erosion Minor Negative Impact Petroleum and Hazardous Waste Spills Minor Negative Impact Temporary Loss of Productive Land Minor Negative Impact Impacts of Temporary Access Roads Mitigable Impact Impacts on Noise and Dust Mitigable Impact Environmental Impacts Caused Construction Workers Mitigable Impact Social Impacts Caused by Construction Workers Mitigable Impact Health and Safety Mitigable Impact Operationas Phase Impacts Social Development and Poverty Alleviation Significant Positive Impact Habitat Fragmentation Minor Negative Impact Increased Access to Wildlands Minor Negative Impact Health and Safety Mitigable Impact Avian and Aircraft Hazards Not Significant Impact Induced Effects from Electromagnetic Fields Not Significant Impact Impacts on Noise and Dust Not Significant Impact Petroleum and Hazardous Waste Contamination Not Significant Impact Page vii September 2003

17 Category B ETA EVN and PC 3 Rural Encrgy I - Phase II Public Consultation and Disclosure As the project is the second phase of the on-going project, the consultation with the related people already conducted at the provincial and district levels from the beginning of the project in For the second phase for the new communes, the meetings for public consultation were organised in every commune with the local people during the period of the preparation of Feasibility Study in At these meetings, the major technical, resettlement and compensation entitlement, land acquisition, environmental issues and proposed mitigation measures were discussed. The local authority and people will give their comments on: appropriate designed line routes, anv other potential risk to environment. all questions of PAP should be addressed, all recommendations and concerns of PAP and PC should be recorded. The local commune/district authorities also signed the drawings. The original EIA was sent to the concerned PPCs for clearance and to DOSTE for public display in December Environment Management Plan (EMP) The EMP consists of mitigation, monitoring measures to be taken during implementation and operation to eliminate adverse environmental and social impacts, offset them, or reduce them to acceptable levels. Environmental management during construction period is implemented by the Project Management Unit (PMU). PMU is responsible for guiding and supervising Contractors during application of mitigation measures as well as environmental monitoring. During the operation phase, the environmental issue will under responsibility of the Provincial Power Services. Local authorities will be hired to measure the environmental quality along transmission lines and substations and report will be made and submitted to relevant responsible authorities. The EMP includes plan and cost for institutional strengthening such as training on environmental issues. Conclusion The Project will supply electricity to 86 remote and mountainous communes of Central Vietnam. By providing this service, the Project will help improve the livelihood of 43,317 households. The impact of this service is evaluated as significant positive and long term. In order to provide electrification services, the Project will create some negative impacts to the natural and social environment. Most of these impacts are minor negative and short term, or rnitigable. Page viii September 2003

18 Rural Energy I - Phase II 1 Introduction The objective of Rural Energy Project (REP) is to assist the Government of Vietnam to increase the electrification ratio in rural areas in order to achieve the electrification targets set by the Government of Vietnam (GOV). These targets envisage provision of energy to 100% of the districts, 80% of the communes and 60% of the households by the year The REP's contributions to achieve GOV electrification targets are twofold: 1) development of a national strategy for electrification and for provision of energy to the remote mountainous areas, and 2) connecting about 900 communcs throughout Vietnam to the national grid. The REP is a large project that is subdivided into tvo phases (Phase I, Phase II) and three regions (North, Central, South). This report reviews the environmental impacts of one component of the REP: Phase II activities in the Central Region. Phase II Central Region Project (the Project) aims to connect 86 communes in Central Vietnam to the national grid'. Because the GOV will receive a World Bank loan to conduct the Project, this report and its related activities follow both World Bank's safeguard policies and GOVs policies on enviromnental assessment and environmental protection. The content of this environmental assessment was prepared in accordance with the main subject areas identified World Bank's OP 4.01, Annex B: * Project Description * Policy, legal, and administrative frarnework * Baseline Data * Environmental Impacts * Analysis of Alternatives * Disclosure * Public Consultation * Environmental Management Plan Supporting information to the environmental assessment are supplied in accordance with annexure subjects identified in OP 4.01 Annex B: * List of EA report preparers * References-written materials both published and unpublished, used in study preparation * Record of interagency and consultation meetings * Tables presenting the-relevant data referred to or summarized in the main text * List of associated reports Phase I Central Region Subproject aims to connect 163 communncs to the national grid. Page 1 September 2003

19 Rural Energy I - Phase II 2 Project Description 2.1 Name of Project: Rural Energy Project for Central Region of Vietnam, Phase Executing Agencies: Investor: Power Company 3 (PC3) * Project Management Unit: Central Region Rural Energy Project Management Board (CCREPMB-PC3) 2.3 Socio economic Target of Project The project Phase I and Phase II together will supply power to 249 communes and commune groups in 9 provinces in the central region of Vietnam. The project will give 108,042 households (64,725 in Phase I, and 43,317 in Phase II), or about 500,000 people the access to the reliable energy sources. The access to the cheap, reliable energy will give the condition for improving the economv, and improving the living conditions of the people in the project areas. 2.4 Main Features of the Project The Project aims at supplying electrifying 86 communes and commune groups of 7 provinces within The main features are summansed in Table 2 1. Table 2.1: Main features of the Project Parameter Specification Voltage medium voltage 22 (35)kV low voltage 220/380V Number of Circuits I or 2 Towers Centnfugal concrcte poles Line ROW MV lines 8m wide for 35 KV T/L line; 6m wide for 22 KV T/L lines; LV lines 2 m wide Ground Clearance > 6m Scope of Investment 7 Provinces 33 Districts 86 Communes Transmission Lines independent MV lines 831 km MV-LV combination lines 245 km LV lines 615 km Substations 572 Installedmeters 43,317 Total Capacity 21,705 kva Page 2 September 2003

20 Rural Energy I - Phase Project Schedule Project implementation will occur between January 2003 to June Proposed Schedule of the Project is given in Annex Project Cost The total investment for the project is estimated at VND 349,316, (equivalent US$ 22.7 million). A summary of estimated costs is provided in Table 2.2 Table 2.2: Summaiv of estimated project costs USS million VND million Equipment ,000 Construction ,000 Other cost ,000 Contingencies ,000 Total ,000 Page 3 September 2003

21 Rural Energy I - Phase II 3 Policy, Legal, and Administrative Framework 3.1 World Bank Policy on Environmental Assessment The Project is classified as a Categorv A project and therefore requires the completion of a full-scale EIA. The World Bank's policy on conducting a full-scale EIA is to follow Operational Directive 4.01 Environmental Assessment. This directive describes guidance on Bank's policies and procedurcs for conducting environmental assessments of proposed projects. Annex B of the Operational Directive specifies the requirements for an EIA report. Additional World Bank policies that were considered through the Project's EIA process include: * OPN Cultural Property * OP 4.04 Natural Habitats * OP 4.09 Pest Management * OP 4.12 Involuntary Resettlement, * OD 4.20 Indigenous Peoples, * OP 4.36 Forestry; and * BP Public Disclosure Detailed guidance on assessment methodologies and common impacts associated with transmission projects are found in: * World Bank, Environmental Assessment Sourcebook, Volume 3 * IFC, Environmental, Health, and Safety Guidelines on Electric Power Transmission and Distribution. 3.2 Vietnamese Policy and Administrative Framework on Environmental Assessment Vietnamese Policy Framework Vietnam's most relevant environmental policies for environmental assessment are: (i) (ii) Law on Protection of the Environment (LEP) was enacted in The LEP: identifies the responsibilities of the state centre, provinces, organizations and individuals to prevent and remedy environmental deterioration and pollution and carry out specified environmental protection functions; * provides for the development of environmental standards and submission of environmental impact assessment reports on new and existing facilities; * provides for responsible parties to pay compensation for environmental damage; * establishes the right of individuals and organizations to petition for enforcement of environmental regulations; * calls for civil and criminal penalties for violations; and * encourages international environmental co-operation. Decree 175/CP was promulgated in 1994 to guide implementation of the LEP and provides broad guidelines for division of responsibility among Ministries; environmental impact assessments; pollution prevention and disaster control; sources of finance; and environmental inspections and standards. Page 4 September 2003

22 Rural Energy I - Phase II (iii) Circular No. 490 was promulgated in 1998 to provide guidance on setting up and appraising environmental impact assessment reports for investment projects. The Circular identifies the legal requirements according to the stages of implementation of a project and its category; defines the content of project subject to the EIA procedures; and specifies management of the EIA report appraisal. To supplement the above key environmental assessment policies, there are a large range of laws, decisions, regulations, and standards may also be considered: (iv) Law on Forest Protection (1992) This law regulates forest management, protection, development, and exploitation, prevention of wood-cutting, and forest destruction. It also encourages individuals and organizations to protect and develop forests. (v) Decree 54/1999/ND-CP specifies guidance on the protection of high-voltage networks. (vi) (vii) (viii) (ix) Decree 70/1987-HDBT specifies safety casements of high-voltage transmission lines. Decree 24/2000/ND-CP specifies the implementation on the Law on Foreign Investment in Vietnam (Article 82) concerning environmental protection as follows: 1) enterprises with foreign investment capital and joint ventures are obligated to observe regulations, satisfy standards in environment protection, and comply with Vietnam legislation on environment protection; 2) if investors apply intemational advanced environmental standards these standards should be registered Nvith MoSTE. Decree 52/1999/ND-CP was appended to include environmental considerations for construction management as follows: 1) for PFS, Provision 3 of Article 23 stipulates that requirements for environment study relating to the "selection of construction sites, estimation of land use area needed, in ways which comply to the principle of minimizing land use and environmental and social impacts, and resettlement to the lowest possible level". 2) Provisions 4 and 7 of Article 24 stipulate that FS must propose "specific site options (or regions, routes) which much match with construction plans (including documents on site selection, together with proposed solutions for minimizing environmental and social impacts)", and "architectural altematives, construction solutions, preliminary designs suggested for selection, environment management and protection solutions". 3) For technical design: Section B, Provision 1, Article 37 and Section A, Provision 2, Article 38, contain regulations on appraisal and approval of "techniques for the protection of environment and ecology; for prevention and combating of explosion and fire and for occupational safety and industrial sanitation." Decree 26/1996/CP provides regulations on the punishment of administrative violation of Environmental Protection Law. Chapter 1 describes the general provisions for punishment under the Environment Protection Law. Chapter 2, Article 6 details recommended punishments for parties who violate environmental pollution and prevention act. These punishments include financial penalties for not submitting an EIA report. (x) Tieu ChAun Viet Nam (TCVN) are national standards established by MoSTE and applied to all government agencies. They include engineering, construction, scientific, and environmental standards. Most TCVN standards are direct translations of ISO standards. TCVN environmental standards include acceptable limits of many air, noise, and water quality parameters. In general, the list of bio-physical parameters are broad enough such that most monitoring programmes can employ TCVN standards as metrics of evaluation. There are some exceptions - for example, sediment, soil, and vibration standards do not yet exist. In these cases, it is common practice for ODA projects to use standards from other countries or international organisations. (xi) 18 TCN provides standards for safety clearances for 500 KV Electrical Equipment Installation Standards. Section I of this policy states numerous requirements. For example, trees outside of the ROW must have two meters clearance between conductors and trees, and the clearance between top of the trees and conductors in the ROW must not be less than six meters. Page 5 September 2003

23 Rural Energy I - Phase 11 (xii) 1I TCN-1984 sets the standard for minimum clearance between live parts of a line and trees. Trees outside of ROW must ensure two meters of clearance between conductors and tree parts. The clearance between top of the trees and conductors in the ROW must not be less than six meters. The ROW identified bv two parallel planes is seven meters from the outer conductors when they are vertical and not less than two meters when conductors are at maximum swing angle Vietnamese Administrative Framework The Government of Vietnam is in the process of creating a new administrative framework for environmental management. For the Additional Works Project, the framework's relevant institutes are as follows: (i) (ii) (iii) Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment (MoNRE). MoNRE was established by a Prime Ministerial Decision on November 11, This new ministry includes four vice-ministers, 16 departments, one newspaper, and one magazine. MoNRE merges numerous departments from several national agencies. These are outlined in Decree 91/2002/ND-CP: Providing for the functions, duties, powers and organisational structure of the Ministry of Natural Resources and the Environment. Environmental Impact Assessment and Appraisal Department. This Department is under MoNRE. According to Decree 91/20021ND-CP, the Department's function includes: To appraise environmental impact assessment reports of projects and of business and production establishments. Environmental Impact Assessment and Appraisal Department is guided by the Vietnam's established regulatory framework: i.e. LEP, Circular 490, CP 175, etc. Provincial Departments of Natural Resources and Environment (DoNRE). Each provincial DoNRE houses an Environmental Management Division (EMD). The EMD is responsible for ensuring environmental protection and management of provincial matters in accordance with LEP, Decree 175, and Circular 490. Hence, it is DoNRE - and in particular, its EMD - that will likely play a key regulatorv role during project construction and operation. Page 6 September 2003

24 Rural Energy I - Phase II 4 Baseline Conditions 4.1 Project-Level Baseline Conditions The Socio-economic Environment The Project is located in seven provinces of Central Vietnam: Quang Binh, Quang Tri, Quang Nam, Quang Ngai, Gia Lai, Kon Tum and Dak Lak. The total natural area of the Project provinces is 73,050 ki 2, representing 22.3% of Vietnam's land mass. The total of population of the Project area is 7,290,400 people, about 9% of Vietnam's total population. The population density of this region is 111 heads/km 2. This is the lowest population density of the country (the average density of the whole country is 223 individuals/knm 2 ). The rural population is 80% and the growth rate of population is about 2.1 %. Although the North and South regions of Vietnam have benefited greatly from Doi Mot 2 the Central region of Vietnam lags behind in its development rate. For the period of 5 years ( ), the living standard of people in the Central region is increasing, but it is still in an unstable situation. This is especially true in rural areas, where the living-standard are often below the poverty line The Natural Environment Topographic Conditions The topographic condition of this region is complex. The altitude varies from the high area in the west (highland) to the low area in the East (coastal area). The west side belongs to Mekong river basin. In the west, there are very high mountains and deep valleys. The east side topography is rather flat in the estuaries of rivers. In the river catchment area some plains were formed and are now cultivated with different crops and paddy. The proposed routes will pass through all of these different topographic areas. Meteorological Conditions The Project lays in a tropical and monsoon climate. The maximum temperature in Quang Binh and Quang Tri is observed to 40 C in summer and the minimum temperature in the winter season is observed to 10 C. The rainy season is from May to November in the highland and from September to December in the coastal area. The rainfall concentrates most from August to October (in highlands) and October to November (in coastal areas). The rainfall during these periods are estimated about 80% from the total annual rainfall. Heavy storms happen very often in the East regions because this region extends along the sea and there are high mountainous ranges along and very closed to the seashores. The rivers are short and very steep in the middle region. Especially in the coastal area, the river beds are very steep. Because of that verv high peak flood and volume of flood come can occur after a few hours of heavy rains. In the past, some storms entered these regions with very high speed of wind (118 km/h) caused very heavy rain. The maximum daily rainfall in the coastal area were measured over 600 mm and the maximum peak flood unit estimated over 15 m 3 /s. In highlands, -these values are much lower, nowhere the maximum daily rainfall over 300 mm and maximum peak flood also not more than 3.5 m 3 /s. There are about ten prevailing major soil types in the project area.-these include: * plinthic acrisols on clay shale, metamorphic stone, and sandstone (most common types); 2 Doi Moi is a gcneral policy of economic reform that has been in implementation throughout Vietnam since 1986 Page 7 September 2003

25 Rural Energy I - Phase II * plinthic acrisols on stone of magma acid-riolit-daxite; * limestone, rhodic ferralsols, haplic alisols, humic acrisols; * cabonate black soil, dystric fluvisols, furic fluvisols. 4.2 Provincial-Level Baseline Conditions QuangBinh Natural Features * QuangBinh province locates at centre of the central region, adjoins Ha Tinh province to the North, QuangTri to the South, PDR Lao to the west and the East Sea to the east. * The total natural area of QuangBinh is 8,052 km 2 comprising of 15 percent of plain areas and 85 percent of mountainous and forest areas. QuangBinh is situated on a rather complex topography sloping in west-east direction. The plains is narrow and mainly along the rivers. * There are five main rivers in QuangBinh, such as Ron, Giang, Lyhoa, Dinh and Nhatle rivers. Most of them are short and have many branches. Population and Employment Lands * According to an investigation in 1999, the population of QuangBinh province is 794 thousand people that comprise of 393 thousand male and 401 thousand female people. There are 86 thousand people in urban and 708 thousand in rural areas. * Following the statistic report in 1999, the total land is 805 thousand hectares, in which there are 63.5 thousand hectares of agricultural land, 491 thousand hectares of forest land and 4.2 thousand hectares of resident land; and 20 thousand hectares for other QuangTri Natural Features * QuangTri province is also located in the centre of the central region. It adjoins QiuangBinh province to the North, Thua Thien-Hue to the South, People's Democratic Republic of Lao to the West and the sea to the East. The total natural area of QuangTri is 4,746 km 2. Population and Employment Lands * According to investigation in 1999, the population of QuangTri province is 7,573 thousand people that comprise of 49 percent of male and 51 percent of female people. There are thousand people in urban and thousand in rural areas. * Following the statistic report in 1999, the total land is thousand hectares, in which there are 68.6 thousand hectares of agricultural land, 491 thousand hcctares of forest land and 3.6 thousand hectares of resident land, and 18.3 thousand hectares for other. Page 8 September 200'

26 Rural Energy I - Phase QuangNam Natural Features * QuangNam province is one of the coastal central provinces. It adjoins Danang citv and Thua Thien-Hue province to the North, KonTum and QuangNgai to the South, People's Democratic Republic of Lao to the West and the sea to the East. * The total natural area of QuangNam is km 2. QuangNam has multi-topography such as plains, mountainous, high-land and coastal areas. Population and Employment Lands * According to investigation in 1999, the population of QuangNam province is 1,372.4 thousand people. 18 percent of population is in urban and 82 percent in rural areas. There are 734 thousand people of labour age. The rate of labour is contributed in economic sectors as following: o Forestry and agricultural sector: 72% o Industrv sector: 7.5% o Construction sector: 3 6% o Service: 16.6% * Following the statistic report in 2000, the total land is 1,040.8 thousand hectares, in which there are thousand hectares of agricultural land, 430 thousand hectares of forest land and 7 thousand hectares of resident land, and 26 thousand hectares for other QuangNgai Natural Features * QuangNgai is the coastal province of the central region. It adjoins QuangNam province to the North, BinhDinh to the South, KonTum to the West and the sea to the East. * The total natural area of QuangNgai is 5,168.3 km 2 of which 75 percent of the total area is mountainous and forest areas. QuangNgai is situated on a rather complex topography sloping in a West-East direction and divided into four areas: plain, mountainous, highland and island. Population and Employment * According to investigation in 1999, the population of QuangNgai province is 1,190 thousand people which is comprised of 580 thousand male and 610 thousand female people percent of population are of labour age GiaLai Natural Features * GiaLai is one of three high land provinces It adjoins KonTum province to the North, DacLac to the South, the Republic of Cambodia to the West and QuangNgai, BinhDinh and Phuyen provinces to the East. * The total natural area of GiaLai is 16,212 km 2. GiaLai is situated on a rather complex topography sloping in a West-East direction. GiaLai has a lot of rivers such as Ba, Dacbla, Sesan, lalop, Ia Hleo, and IaKrel. Page 9 September 2003

27 Rural Energy I - Phase II Population and Employment Lands According to an investigation in 1999, the population of GiaLai province has 972 thousand people that comprise of 491 thousand male and 481 thousand female people. There arc 403 thousand people of labour age * Following the statistic report in 2000, the total land is comprised of thousand hectares of agricultural land thousand hectares of forest land and 9.9 thousanld hectares of resident land, and 51.7 thousand hectares for other KonTum Natural Features * KonTum province is located in a high-land region. It adjoins QuangNam province to the North, GiaLai province to the South, People's Democratic Republic of Lao and the Republic of Cambodia to the West and the QuangNgai to the East. * The total natural area of KonTum is 10,558 km 2. KonTum has the highest mountain of the southern area of Vietnam, Ngoclinh, with height of 2,596 meters. Population and Employment Lands * According to an investigation in 1999, the population of KonTum province is 314 thousand people that comprise of 158 thousand male and 156 thousand female people. 51 percent of population is ethnic minorities There are 131 thousand people of labour age. Following the statistic report in 1999, the total land is comprised of 52 thousand hectares of agricultural land, 641 thousand hectares of forest land DacLac Natural Features * DacLac province is one of three high land provinces. It adjoins GiaLai province to the North, LamDong and BinhPhuoc provinces to the South, The Republic of Cambodia to the West and Phu Yen and Khanh Hoa provinces to the East. The total natural area of DacLac is 19,800 km 2. It is the largest province of Vietnam. There are three main rivers: Ba, Serepok, Dongnai. Population and Employment Lands * According to an investigation in 1999, the population of DacLac province is 1,776.3 thousand people that is comprised of 902 thousand male and 874 thousand female people. * Following the statistic report in 1999, the total land is 1980 thousand hectares, in which there are 208 thousand hectares of agricultural land, 1250 thousand hectares of forest land Page 10 September 2003

28 Rural Energy I - Phase II 5 Analysis of Alternatives 5.1 Alternatives to the Project There are several alternatives available for supplving energy to the Project area, including: * small hydropower; * wind energy; * solar energy; * diesel generators; and * medium hydropower. These altematives were not as viable as the alternative to expand and rehabilitate the existing grid system for the following reasons: * The national network grid was already available; therefore it was most cost effective to add to the grid rather than to develop new energy sources. * If diesel, wind, solar, energy, or small hydro were selected, the beneficiaries would be much more limited than the proposed project. * If medium hydropower used, the proposed network would still need to be developed. * Solar energy and wind energy would require tremendous investment to support 86 communes. This region has high poverty rate, not suitable for large investment. Also, if solar or wind energy was used, EVN's support for investment, installation, and operation would not be considered cost efficient. A gnd network is more reliable - is most common way to utilize energy by grid. A grid network has added benefit of creating infrastructure for installing fibre-optic cables and other communications lines. 5.2 Alternatives within the Project The following altematives were considered within the Project: * Commune Selection for Project Participation: Early in the project cycle PC 3 issued a letter to each of the seven participating Provincial People's Committees. The letter invited each committee to nominate communes for inclusion in the Project. The committees were informed that eligibility will be based on the following criteria: o The commune is currently not electrified under national grid system; o At least 60% of households in the commune will agree to being connected to the grid system; o The commune must be in a location where it is physically possible to connect to the existing grid system; o Provincial/district/commune People's Committees agree to pay for and manage site clearance and compensation as specified in RAP. Based on these criteria, each Provincial People's Committee responded with a shortlist of eligible communes. This short list was verified by PC3, who sent consultants to the field to advise on the eligibility of each proposed commune From this process, 86 communes were selected for Project participation. Page 11 September 2003

29 Rural Energy I - Phase II * Transmission Line Options: There are twvo options for transmission lines: high voltage (above 33 KV) and medium voltage (6-35 KV). The option of medium voltage (MV) lines was selected because: o MV lines are more cost effective o MV lines take less skill and effort construct, maintain, and operate o MV lines have more simple material requirements a MV lines require a shorter construction period * Alignment and Substation Options: A number of alignment and substation options were considered in each commune. These options were presented by the Consultant to PC3 using detailed scale maps. A simplified example of alignment options for a commune is presented in Figure 5. 1: Figure 5.1: Simplified example of alignment options presented by Consultant to PC3 - Existing 15 KV line f> Option Proposed MV line / * Substation / <- ProposedLVLines, ;/g >~~~~} Commune 3_ XOption '. 2, ' The relative socialuenvironmental impacts, capital/operating costs, and technical feasibility of each option were discussed between the Consultant and PC3. Based on the available information and further consultation with relevant parties (Consultant, People's Committees, etc) alignments were selected for each commune. * Access routes for construction and operation: Due to the high level of effort required to build access roads and their high potential for environmental impact, access routes for construction and operation will be primarily limited to existing roads. If roads to not exist, then consideration will be given to hand-carrying equipment to the appropriate site. If this option is not feasible, then the commune was likely to become ineligible for participation in the Project. * Conductor cross-section and capacity of transformers: Conductor cross-section and capacity of transformer were calculated from forecast of load demand at each commune. Load demand is directly forecasted based on investigation data on existing situation, scale of production, population allocation, load figured, expected socio-economic growth, and the master plan of each commune. In addition, the calculation of conductor cross-section and capacity of transformer must be considered their economic aspects. If not, the project cost is higher and as well as energy loss from them. * Selection of substation type: There are many voltages (15/0.04 kv; 10/0.4 kv; 22/0.4 kv) and capacities (15 kva, 20 kva, 25 kva, 30 kva, 50 kva) that could be selected for each substation. The choice(s) for each commune, and their relative capital/operating costs, and technical feasibilitv were considered by PC 3, PMU and other stakeholders. Page 12 September2003

30 Rural Energy I - Phase "No-Project" Alternative If the "No Project" alternative was implemented, 43,317 houscholds could not access the network for use of the electncity. Some of Vietnam's poorest people in the country most remote areas will not likely have access to electricitv of any kind in the near future. This will affect their chances of economic development and povertv alleviation, two pillars of Vietnamese development policy The remaining sections of this report address the environmental impacts, mitigation, and monitoring activities required for the most favoured alternatives of the Projcct. Page 13 September2003

31 Rural Energy I - Phase 11 6 Analysis of Impacts 6.1 Impact Assessment Methodology The Environmental Impact Assessment focuses on the major environmental issues of the Project's Most Favoured Alternative. The potential impacts of the Project's pre-construction. construction, and operation phases were assessed as being in one of five categories: i. NO IMPACT. The potential impact of the Project activity is assessed as NO IMPACT if the project activity is physically removed in space or time from the environmental component. ii. MAJOR IMPACT. An impact is said to be MAJOR if the project activity has potential to affect an environmental component. Major impacts could be "Major Negative" or "Major Positive." The following criteria were used to determine whether a given impact is MAJOR. a) spatial scale of the impact (site, local, regional, or national! international); b) time horizon of the impact (short, medium, or long term); c) magnitude of the change in the environmental component brought about bv the Project activities (small, moderate, large); d) importance to local human populations; e) compliance with national, provincial, or district environmental protection laws, standards, and regulations3; f) compliance with Vietnam's international commitments. These include the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance especially as Waterfowl Habitat (RAMSAR), the Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage (World Heritage Convention), and the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES); and g) compliance with World Bank guidelines, policies, and regulations 4 iii. iv. MINOR IMPACT. If an impact occurs but does not meet the criteria for a Major Impact it is assigned the category MINOR. Minor impacts could be "Minor negative" or "Minor Positive. " UNKNOWN IMPACT. The potential impact of a project activity will be assessed as being UNKNOWN if the magnitude of the effect can not be predicted for any of the following reasons: a) the nature and location of the project activity is uncertain; b) the occurrence of the environmental component within the study area is uncertain; c) the time scaleof the effect is unknown; or d) the spatial scale over which the effect may occur is unknown. v. MITIGABLE IMPACT. The potential impact of a project activity on an environmental component is said to be MITIGABLE if there is potential for a major negative impact and the proposed mitigation measure will prevent the impact or reduce the impact to acceptable levels. 3 See Section 3 of this report for more details 4 See Section 3 of this report for more details Page 14 September2003

32 Rural Energy I - Phase II 6.2 Summary of Impacts Table 6.1 summarises the Project's impacts during pre-construction, construction, and operation. The details of each impact are discussed in remaining sections of this section. Table 6.1: Summarv of Impacts Impact Title Pre-CQnstruction Phase Impacis Project Affected Households Land Acquisition Impacts Caused Bv Clearing the ROW Cultural Property Health Risks Related to Explosives, and Toxic Substances Impact Valuation Mitigable Impact Mitigable Impact Minor Negative Impact No Impact Mitigable Impact Construetion Phase Impacts Soil Erosion Minor Negative Impact Petroleum and Hazardous Waste Spills Minor Negative Impact Temporary Loss of Productive Land Minor Negative Impact Impacts of Temporary Access Roads Mitigable Impact Impacts on Noise and Dust Mitigable Impact Environmental Impacts Caused Construction Workers Mitigable Impact Social Impacts Caused by Construction Workers Mitigable Impact Health and Safetv Mitigable Impact Operations Phase Impacts Social Development and Poverty Alleviation Habitat Fragmentation Increased Access to Wildlands Health and Safetv Avian and Aircraft Hazards Induced Effects from Electromagnetic Fields Noise and Dust Petroleum and Hazardous Waste Contamination 6.3 Pre-Construction Phase Impacts Project Affected Households - MITIGABLE IMPACT Significant Positive Impact Minor Negative Impact Minor Negative Impact Mitigable Impact Not Significant Impact Not Significant Impact Not Significant Impact Not Significant Impact A total of 3,668 households (about 19,000 persons) will be affected by the Project. Most of these households will be affected by: 1) having some of their trees cut down; 2) relocating their house or other structures within their existing property; 3) land acquisition of part of their land (usually less than 3m 2 ; 4) if their house or agricultural land is in the ROW, they will be restricted to growing trees less than 4m in height (in no cases will houses will the height of houses need to be reduced), and 5) during construction, some PAHs will temporarily lose use of their productive land. A summary of PAH impacts is found in Table 6.2. Page 15 September 2003

33 Rural Energy I - Phase II Annex 3: Record of Consultation Meetings Record of interagency and consultation meetings, including consultations for obtaining the informed views of the affected people and local nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Please contact PC 3 for more information on Consultation Meeting Records Page 52 September 2003

34 Category.B EIA EVN and PC 3 Rural Energy I - Phase II Table 6.2: Impacts on Project Affected Households No. Province Total Number of Temporary Permanent PAHls PAHs PAHs I Quang Binh Quang Tri QuangNam Quang Ngai Gia La Kon Tum Dak Lak 1, TOTAL 3,668 3, The proposed mitigation measure is compensation. The detailed compensation scheme is presented in the Project's Resettlement Action Plan. The Plan has been prepared according to World Bank guidelines and Vietnamese legislation. The total cost for RAP implementation is VND billion VND (approximately 400,529 USD). The budget for compensation and resettlement will be arranged by the Provincial People's Committees of each province Lands Acquisition - MITIGABLE IMPACT The proposed routes will pass through the different environmental regions. Almost the routes will pass along a mix of forest, bare land, crops area, and residential area. However, because the ROW for the transmission line is required is only 6m for medium voltage and 2m for low voltage, the total area of land acquired bv the Project is relativelv little. In total, the Project will acquire about 457 hectares of land. A summary of land acquisition is found in Table 6 3 Table 6.3: Land Acquired for the Project Temporary Impacted Land Permanent Impacted Land No. Province Total (m 2 ) (n 2 ) (n 2 ) Residential Productive Residential Productive Land Land Land Land I Quang Binh 244, ,906 80,076 2, Quang Tri 118,120 29,201 81,030 3,905 3,984 3 Quang Nan 113,630 11, , Quang Ngai 519,377 83, ,981 2,331 4,754 5 Gia Lai 1,736, ,933 1,093,257 13,959 19,127 6 Kon Tum 315,978 53, , Dak Lak 1,521, ,124 1,213,742 3,795 16,636 TOTAL 4,569,580 1,234,391 3,261,462 26,740 46, Impacts Caused by Clearing the ROW - MINOR NEGATIVE IMPACT The clearing of the ROW will occur during Pre-Construction shortly after the land acquisition activities. ROW clearing activities include: 1) permanent tree cutting and vegetation control; and 2) temporary clearing of agriculture area land. Pa'ge 16 September 2003

35 Rural Energy I - Phase II Based on the RAP, the following comments can be made on land acquisition: * More than 50% of the proposed ROW is agriculture land, which usually cultivated by the food crops, rice and some industrial trees. The height of these crops are normally less than I m, therefore all the agricultural activity will remain unchanged. Therefore, there will be no impact on agricultural areas. * Data from the field surveys confirmed that there are no primary forests, no protected forests or reserved forests are in the ROW. These impacts could be recovered by the proper compensation to the PAH, so that they can usc the compensation for re-cultivating the lost trees. The measures of the compensation are discussed in details in RAP of the project. * Residential and fallow land are already reasonably well developed, and hold very little ecological or biodiversity value. For this reason, project construction in these areas would have no impact on ecological integrity or biodiversity. The main impacts of clearing the ROW include: 1) some people mav try to burn waste vegetation on site - this can increase the risk of uncontrolled fires, 2) some people mav be injured by felling trees, and 3) soil erosion may occur. The significant of these impacts is considered to be minor negative Cultural Property - NO IMPACT According to the RAP, the Project will not impact any cultural property, as defined by WB OP This is for three reasons: 1) flexible nature of aligning transmission and distribution lines; 2) rather sparse population of people in the Project area, 3) the participatory nature of designing alignments means that each commune is involved in selected alignment, and the final alignment in each commune must be approved by the commune's People's Committee Health Risks Related to Explosives, and Toxic Substances - MITIGABLE IMPACT Some of the northem communes in the Project have identified landmines remaining in the ground. This is consistent with the general observation that there are landmines have been found near Vietnam's international borders, mortar shells from previous wars are found at shallow depths in some provinces, and in general, unexploded aerial bombs of 100 kg or more probably lay within the first 10 m of soil in the Project area. Many agriculture areas have been de-mined at shallow depths. However, there has not been comprehensive de-mining, (i) in non-productive land, especially near international borders, and (ii) at depths greater than 2 meters in some of the Project area. This means that some construction activities (building access roads, excavation to install transmission towers) may be at risk of coming in contact with unexploded ordnance and/or toxic substances 6.4 Construction Phase Impacts Soil Erosion - MINOR NEGATIVE IMPACT The project is located in a mountainous region that is subject to monsoon periods of heavy rain (see Section 4 for more details). Erosion is most common during the rainy season, when about 80% of rainfall occurs. The construction of MV lines on steep slopes could exacerbate erosion rates 5 However, the overall Project impact on erosion during construction will likely be minor for the following reasons: * Construction of medium voltage lines will only occur during dry season, * The ROW required to construct medium voltage lines is 6-8m, Low voltagc lines will bc constructed on relatively flat surfaces Pa'ge 17 September 2003

36 Rural Energy I - Phase II It has been estimated that 4m 2 of vegetation cover will be damaged in every 100 m stretch of working area. And when lines are closer to the populated or agricultural areas, the rate of erosion is significantlv lower because the topography is normally flat; and The construction of low-voltage lines (about V2 the Project) will occur on relativelv flat surfaces with little excavation, thereby the rate of erosion will be minimal Petroleum and Hazardous Waste Spills - MINOR IMPACT Petroleum and hazardous waste spills may be caused by several sources, including: 1) oil leakage from the construction equipment and transformers during their operation; 2) spillage from filling combustible engines such as vehicles and generators; and 3) dumping of waste petroleum products and hazardous chemicals. These impacts will likely be minor for the following reasons: * The erection of the poles and the electrical equipment from 35 kv and lower, as practice in Vietnam, is done manually. Therefore there will be relatively few combustible engines used during most construction activities. The transformers used in Rural Energy project are very small and contain less than 20 litres of oil. Operation records from other projects show transformer containers rarely break during installation or operation. and therefore, oil leakage from transformers is insignificant. * PCBs and asbestos, twvo hazardous materials that are used in Vietnam, will not be used in the Project. It is expected this impacts can be mitigated through oil and hazardous waste management practices described in later sections of this report Temporary Loss of Productive Land - MINOR IMPACT According to the RAP, some land will be used temporarily by the Project for many purposes. For example: * Temporary construction access roads; * Borrow pits, service yards. and other construction site needs; and * Construction camps; It is expected that these impacts are short-term and temporary. However, if unmitigated, even such short-term impacts could be significant for the farmers who rely on small tracts of productive land for their eamings. For this reason, mitigation measures for temporary loss of productive land will be considered by the Project Impacts of Temporary Access Roads - MITIGABLE IMPACT As the length of the MV transmission line from the commune to the connection point is relatively short, usually ranged from 2 to 15 km, the access roads for the transportation would not be required most of the time. This is because, in practice, if some parts of the lines can not be accessed by the trucks, the contractors usually opt for manual transportation, since the labour costs are much cheaper than the costs of constructing access roads. In some very special cases when the access road is unavoidable, the selection of temporary roads during construction should be considered during design period and will reconfirm before implementation Impacts on Noise and Dust - MITIGABLE IMPACT In residential areas, the main construction impact is building distribution lines. Most of this work (e.g the construction of the 35/22 kv poles and equipment) is done manually. For example, the main excavation works will be to dig foundations for the towers. These excavations will be about 8m 3 (2m Page 18 September2003

37 Rural Energy I - Phase II deep, 2m high, 2m wide). Concrete mixing will be done by hand. No bulldozers, loaders, backhoes, etc will be used. The project will however, use some small generators and trucks to transport equipment. The impacts of noise and dust caused by construction are considered to be very mimmal, however, since this work will be conducted near residential areas, it is assessed as an impact which mitigation measures should be applied in some situations Environmental Impacts Caused Construction Workers - MITIGATED IMPACT Construction workers can cause environmental impacts at the worker camp and in the construction area. At worker camps the main environmental issue is usuallv sanitation. These camps typically have poor sanitary conditions, and human wastes are directly deposited into water bodies, as latrines or septic systems are not available. For this reason, construction camps can significantlv increase the concentration of pathogenic disease vectors - particularly if the same water bodies are being used downstream for agricultural or human consumption. This creates a hazard to both the workers and local people. At the construction site, workers can enter into forested areas to cut trees, poach wildlife, and make fires to cook food Social Impacts Caused by Construction Workers - MINOR IMPACT One work crew will be assigned to each commune The size of the work crew will be about 20 nonlocal people and about 5 local people. The work crew will be subdivided into two groups - about half working at one end of the distribution line for that commune, and about half working at the other end of the distribution line for that commune. The worker camps will be about 2-5 km apart, and each camp will be about 100m in area. It is expected that workers will stay in a commune from 2-3 months. Based on the approach to using construction workers in the communes, it is expected that the social impacts of construction workers is minor. This is because:. The total number of immigrant workers is about 20 people per commune, Communes normally have populations of 1,000 to 2,000 people. Therefore, the marginal increase of demand for electricity, food, and social services would be very small - less than 1%; * Each worker camp is only about 10 people - there will not be any large concentrations of workers at any one time at a camp, nor is it likely there will be an significant increase in the demand for recreational drugs and sexual services; * In most communes about 25% of the workers will be from the local commune - this will reduce the local feeling of uncertainty about the "newcomers" to the commune area. It is expected that the social impacts of construction workers will be minor Nevertheless, there are some measures that can be implemented to ensure minimal impact on local people. These are discussed in the following chapter Health and Safety- MITIGATED IMPACT The main health and safety issues during construction phase are: 1) disease of construction workers, 2) industrial accidents for construction workers, and 3) electrical safety for construction workers and the general public alike. Each are discussed below: * Disease: In remote areas, workers may have to stay for period of up to 20 weeks in camps during construction. There are some risks from transmitted diseases among workers during this time. The diseases include malaria, typhoid fever, diarrhoea and other diseases infected from lack of clean drinking water, proper food and from mosquitoes that are common in these remote areas. The risk of these diseases is probably highest in mountainous communes, where living conditions are poor. In this Project, local contractors will manage most construction activities, and therefore are more or less workers arc aware of local conditions This will help them to prepare better for the living conditions in the project sites, Page 19 September2003

38 Rural Energy I - Phase II * Industrial Accidents: Construction workers are at risk from industrial accidents in the workplace. Working near heavy machinery, electricitv, erecting transmission/distribution line all comes with their share of safety risks. The severity and frequency of industrial accidents increase when safety procedures are not implemented, when construction equipment is not maintained, when safety gear is not issued or wom, or when construction workers are not trained on safety procedures. * Electrical Hazards: The Project's construction phasc is subject to several types of electnicity hazards. For example: 1) on-site electrical supplies wvill be required for a range of equipment and lighting needs; 2) excavation and land clearing mav need to take place. near existing electrical utilities; 3) the Project itself is constructing a verv large electrical transmission system, which comes with its own unique set of electrical hazards; 4) the Project mav need to provide temporary sources of power for households and businesses near project affected areas; 5) there is a nrsk that when improving existing power systems, the existing power system may not be turned off properly before the Contractor begins construction; and 6) there is a risk that when the Contractor connects the new transmission line to the existing transmission line, the existing line may still be operating (i.e. live). All of these situations could create a risk of electric shock to workers and the general public alikc. It is important to note that the risk of electrical accidents increase: 1) in remote areas because local people's knowledge of electricity is rather limited; and 2) whenever project works must occur in or near water. 6.5 Operations Phase Impacts Social Development and Poverty Alleviation - SIGNIFICANT POSITIVE The Project will connect 43,317 households in 86 communes to Vietnam's national grid system. Most of these communes are very poor and live under relatively difficult conditions. By providing gnd electrification, it is expected that households will be able to raise their standard of living through improvements in both their home and work Habitat Fragmentation -MINOR NEGATIVE When a ROW cuts through an ecosystem, the sum of the two parts created by the cut is less than the value of the initial whole, even when the habitat loss is not significant. Ecosystems are complex, interdependent relations between species and their physical environment, and the integrity of the ecosystem relies on the maintenance of those interactions. By slicing the natural habitat, the ROW creates weaker ecological sub-units, thus making the whole more vulnerable to invasions and degradation. For this Project the main fragmentation impacts will be minor. This is because there are no primary forests, protected forests, or forests under Programme 661 in the Project area Increased Access to Wildlands - MINOR IMPACT There are two ways in which the Project may increase access to wildlands: * Permanent access roads: Some roads created by the Project will be used during operation phase as maintenance access roads; * Some ROWs are near forested areas. In these cases, the ROWs may increase access for local people to the forests. In both cases, increased access to the wildlands would mean that local people may go to the forests to cut trees for fuel wood/timber, and poach wild animals. These activities are illegal and strictly forbidden under national and local policies. Nevertheless. it is possible that these impacts may occur to a minor degree. Page 20 September 2003

39 Rural Energy I - Phase II Health and Safety - MITIGABLE Impact Thc operation of transmission lines and distribution stations comc with a certain amount of risk - both to maintenance workers and to the general public. This includes: 1) electrical shock, and 2) fires Avian and Aircraft Hazards - NOT SIGNIFICANT IMPACT The height of the highest towers will be 7 metres for low voltage and 9 metres for medium voltage lines. The potential for these impacts is not significant for the following reasons: * Impact on birds: First, there are no wetlands near the Project Area, and the vegetated area is quite poor in condition. Due to this situation, there are very few, if anv, migratory birds near the Project area. Second, EVN (the Proponent) has managed several low-voltage and medium voltage lines in the Central region. There are no known bird electrocutions/accidents on these lines. This is because the local birds are small - not large enough to touch two lines to create an electric current. * Impact on aircraft: First, The highest towers created by the Project are onlv 9m, well below the 50m height required for special safety lights. Indeed, the new towers will not be much higher than the existing residential and vegetated areas in which thev will be placed. Second, planes are very rare in most of the airspace above the Project area Induced Effects from Electromagnetic Fields - NOT SIGNIFICANT The human and environmental impacts of electromagnetic fields are not well known. Published reports from reputable sources show inconsistent conclusions on the relationship between exposure to electromagnetic fields and cancer (e.g. leukaemia, brain cancer) 6. Most scientists agree that the risk of cancer is directly proportional to several factors, of which two are quite important: magnetic field strength and length of exposure. * Magnetic field strength: According to the US EPA, the magnetic field strength of transmission and distribution systems is surprisingly weak (Table 6.4). Indeed, the highest measured results of a 500 KV line in the ROW dunng peak usage (183 milligauss) is lower than the median measurement of magnetic field strength within six inches of many household items (e.g. hair dryers: 300 milligauss; can openers 600 milligauss). Table 6.4: Magnetic field measurements of 115, 230, and 500KV transmission lines 7 Type of Max on Distance from lines (milligauss) Transmission ROW(milligauss) 15m 30m 60m 90m 115 KV Average Use Peak Use KV Average Use Peak Use KV Average Use Peak Use * Length of exposure to magnetic fields. The exposure time of household appliances is relatively short because magnetic fields are created when the appliance is in use. 6 c.f U.S EPA, Evaluation of the Potential Carcinogency of Electromagnetic Fields; BC Hydro, Electromagnetic Fields CWTT, ews Articles on Links of Power Lines to Cancer Source: U.S. EPA, EMvfF in Your Environment: Mlagnetic Field Mlveasurements of Eve,vdav Electncal Devices Page 21 September 2003

40 Rural Energy I - Phase II Transmission and distribution lines, though relatively low-emitters of magnetic fields, provide constant emission. The effects on long term exposure are not well known. EMF data is not available for 0.4 kv low-voltage lines and kv medium voltage lines. However, based on the data in the above table, the EMF created bv the Project would be much lower than those recorded for l l5kv lines. These lines are commonlv used in urban areas throughout the world with no confirmed health effects. Finally, no houses will be placed in the ROW, where the impact of EiMvF is highest 8. For these reasons, the impact of EMF from the Project is considered to be not significant Noise and Dust - NOT SIGNIFICANT Transformers are designed to produce low levels of noise. It is not expected that they will increase noise levels of the ambient area above TCVN 5949 (1998). Table 6.5: TCVN 5949 (1998) Acoustics - Noise in public and residential areas: maximum permitted noise levels. Area Period of Time h h h Quiet Areas Hospitals, Libranes, 50 dba 45 rlba 40 dba Sanatoria, Schools Residential Areas Hotels, Houses, 60 rlba 55 dba 50 dba Apartments Commercial and 75 dba 70 dba 50 dba Service Areas During operation there are no activities that would increase ambient dust levels in the Project area Petroleum and Hazardous Waste Contamination - NOT SIGNIFICANT IMPACT The Project will use very minimal amounts of oil and no hazardous materials 9 during operation phase. The most common situation when an impact can occur is when transformer oil is being refilled. To refill a transformer, a maintenance crew will remove it from the Project site and bring it to the Proponent's provincial branch office for refilling oil and/or changing oil. The branch office has designated oil collection and oil treatment facilities. This maintenance procedure occurs about every 2 years during operation phase. There are 572 transformers that will be operated by the Project. As this is the main potential impact during operations, the overall impact of petroleum and hazardous wastes is considered to be not significant during operations phase. 8 Allowable distance of houses from median of ROW is described Goverment Decree N 54/1999/ND-CP dated 08/07/1999 on Protection of High Voltage Networks 9 The transformers do not contain PCBs. Page 22 Septemoer 2003

41 Rural Energy 1 - Phase 11 7 Mitigation Measures for Negative Impacts The purpose this section is to recommend the most effective approach for mitigating negative impacts created during the Project's pre-construction, construction, and operation phases. In most cases. there is more than one way to mitigate an impact. Mitigation measures can be categorised into four different groups. Each group is presented below: Higher chance of impact mitigation being successful Lower chance of impact mitigation being successful a) Avoid the impact. To "avoid" means to be able to change some aspect of the project design, construction, or operation such that the impact no longer occurs (e.g. changing the alignment of a transmission line so it avoids a sensitive area). b) Minimize the impact. To "minimize" means to implement measures that will reduce impacts to acceptable levels (e.g. ensuring that construction equipment meets TCVN industrial emission standards). c) Rectify the impact. To "rectifv" means to allow an impact to occur. then aftenvards take measures to rehabilitate the environment to a level whereby the impact is within acceptable limits (e.g. use land temporarily for the construction then restore it to its original condition after the construction is complete). d) Compensate for the impact. To "compensate" means to allow the impact to occur, then afternvards provide non-monetary compensation (first priority) or monetarv compensation (second priority) for losses created bv the impact (e.g. if a farmer must be resettled, the first compensation prioritv is to provide replacement land and housing. If replacement land and housing cannot be provided, the replacement value of losses must be calculated and provided to the farmer). Experience from EIA practitioners has found that the approaches are roughly listed in their chance of success: avoiding an impact is most likely to be successful, compensating for an impact is least likely to be successful. The below text below identifies the most likely mitigation measure that can be achieved within the Project's physical, temporal, and technical rcsourccs. 7.1 Pre-Construction Phase Mitigation Measures Project Affected Households Mitigation Objective To reduce the negative effects of resettlement. Description of Mitigation Measure The measures to mitigate the impacts of resettlement are: * avoid the impact: Routes were selected during which minimise the need to relocate houses (see Analysis of Alternatives section); * minimise the impact: When the project will traverse residential areas that cannot be avoided, several pre-construction phase measures will be implemented to minimise impacts on PAHs. These include: i) increasing tower height, ii) increasing the span between towvers: iii) providing special technical options for towers, arms, guys, foundations at locations that have risk of landslide or erosion; iv) conductors will be designed with the insulated wires or cable when the lines are passing through the populated places to avoid the accident of electric shock: v) substations will be designed witlh the hanging type of about 2m high to ensure Page 23 September 2003

42 Rural Energy I - Phase II safety operation and avoid hazardous conditions to human and animal passing by. Substations 'ii also be designed to be equipped with appropriate safety equipment; and vi) poles wvill not be erected in front of the main gate of house or on its premise. The house or structures remained under the line need to be protected according Government Decree No 54/1999/ND- CP dated 08/07/1999 on Protection of High Voltage Networks. compensate for the impact: household that will be affected by the Project will be compensated through the Resettlement Action Plan (see Annex 6 for more details) Land Acquisition Mitigation Objective To reduce the negative effects of land acquisition Description of Mitigation Measure The measures to mitigate the impacts of land acquisition are: * avoid the impact: Selecting routes which minimise the need to acquire land, and in particular, avoid dense forests, natural forests with high ecological values or reserved areas. (see Analysis of Alternatives section); * compensate for the impact: land owners who must release land to accommodate the Project will be compensated through the Resettlement Action Plan (see Annex 6 for more details) Impacts Caused by Clearing the ROW Mitigation Objective Minimize the impacts of burning waste and injurics by cutting trees Mitigation Measure * minimise the impact: Project staffs should work with the local forestry department to ensure that ROW is cleared and maintained according to specifications. Project should support community education activities to inform of hazards of burning waste and cutting trees Health Risks Related to Explosives and Toxic Substances Mitigation Objective Ensure that no workers or local people are harmed bv explosives or toxic substances. Mitigation Measure During Pre-Construction, the Consultant should visit the commune People's Committee to identify areas that could contain UXOs and underground hazardous materials. The Consultant should then visit the Provincial People's Committee and the Army Force (Ministry of Defence) to identify exact locations where de-mining/removal of toxic wastes may need to occur. Next, the Provincial People's Committee will sub-contract a special unit of the Army Force to remove UXOs and toxic substances. After land clearing is complete, the Army Force will submit a letter to Provincial People's Committee to advise the Project area is clear of UXOs and toxic substances. This letter must be issued prior to the beginning of the Project's construction phase. Page 24 September 2003

43 Rural Energy I - Phase Construction Phase Mitigation Measures The construction plan should be optimized regarding the schedule for each construction task to reduce temporary occupation of land and impacts on environment. The details on how to protect the environment during construction are found in this section Soil Erosion Mitigation Objective Minimise soil erosion to the point where the project will not exacerbate the severity and frequency of landslides, that local people can continue to use their land adjacent to the project area without anv net loss in productivity, and that the natural environment is not permanently affected by erosion caused by the project. Description of Mitigation Measure: * avoid the impact: Excavate * (and similar earth-moving project activities) in erosion-prone areas will be scheduled: 1) during the dry season; and /or 2) after harvest to avoid impacts with agricultural productivity and general environmnental stability in and near the project area. This scheduling of excavation to avoid rainy season and harvest season will be written in bidding documents and the General Conditions of Contract. * minimise the impact: Contractor specifications can include the following statements o soil disturbance should be kept to a minimum and shall not be undertaken until immediately prior to construction works beginning in that area. O Surface runoff should be redirected around the project area and into suitable drainage channels. o Excess soil shall be dumped only in approved locations bv the Employer or Engineer. * compensate for the impact: Contractor specifications can include the following statements: o if the contractorfails to minimise soil erosion as per contract agreement, they shall be liable to compensate affected parties for their losses Petroleum and Hazardous Wastes Spills Mitigation Objective Minimise non-point pollution sources from waste dumps, equipment yards, asphalt plants, cement batching plants, and other types of construction sites. Common substances that should be mninimized petroleum products, sediments, raw and uncured concrete, mortar, glues, paints, PCBs, and asbestos, organic and inorganic contaminants, fuels and oils. Description of Mitigation Measure * avoid the impact: Contractor specifications can include the following statement: o PCBs and asbestos shall not be used by the Contractor during any part of project construction. * minimise the impact: Most forms of non-point pollution can be minimised by following TCVN 5524 (1995): General Requirements for Protecting Surface Water Against Pollution; and 2) TCVN 5295 (1995): General Requirements for Protection of Surface and Underground Water Caused by Oil and Oil Products. The relevant contents of these two standards are summarised in the following box: Page 25 September 2003

44 Rural Energy I - Phase 11 Best Practices - Management of Petroleum and Hazardous Products * Prevent the entry of lime, cement, or fresh concrete into waterways. Raw or uncured waste concrete and grouts should be disposed of by removal from the development site or by burial on the site in a location and in a manner that will not impact on a watercourse, Carbon dioxide gas and diffusers should be on site at every water crossing. If uncured concrete spills into the waterbody, C02 gas and diffusers can be used to neutralise the lime. * Wash-down waters from exposed aggregate surfaces, cast-in-place concrete and from concrete trucks should be trapped onsite to allow sediment to settle out and reach neutral ph before the clarified water is released to the storm drain system or allowed to percolate into the ground (approximately 48 hours). * Fuels and lubricants for equipment used on the development site should be carefully handled to avoid spillage, properly secured against unauthorized access or vandalism and provided with spill contaminant according to codes of practice. * Fuelling and lubricating of equipment onsite should only be done after the equipment to be serviced is moved to a constructed service pad with a separate drainage collection system, as far as possible from detention or sedimentation facilities and leave strips. * Any spillage of fuels, lubricants, or hydraulic oils should be immediately contained and the contaminated soil removed from the site and properly disposed of in a location approved by the Engineer. * Waste oils should be collected in leak-proof containers and removed from the site for disposal in a location approved by the Engineer. * The rinsing and cleaning water or solvents for glues, paints, wood preservatives, and other potentially harmful or toxic substances on the development site should be controlled so as to prevent leakage, loss or discharge into the storm drain system * Wood wastes, such as hog fuel, sawdust and wood chips, are not acceptable for fill material. Wood wastes have the potential to release toxic leachates into the aquatic environment. * Where land is being re-developed, and there is contaminahon on site, those contaminants must be removed, disposed of as prescribed by the Engineer Temporary Loss of Productive Land Mitigation Objective Restore all areas used bv the Project to a condition that is at least as environmentally sound as the preproject condition. Description of Mitigation Measures * rectify the impact: Once construction is complete it will be important to return all construction areas temporarily used by the project to a useful state, and to ensure that no longterm environmental impacts of the construction activities persist. The local People's Committees should be involved in discussions of the rehabilitation process. The following best practices for site clean-up will help mitigate long term environmental impacts of: 1) land affected by the Project (construction camps, equipment yards etc): and 2) rehabilitation of water areas affected by the Project (in and around water crossings). Page 26 September 2003

45 Categorv.B EIA EVN and PC 3 Rural Energ, 1 - Phase 11 Best Practices - Rehabilitation of land affected by the Project * Inorganic waste should be disposed of in an approved sanitary landfill sites away from the construction areas, or be recycled where this is economically feasible. * Any remaining organic non-toxic wastes should be ploughed into the soil layers * All areas where oil has been spilled should be ploughed or tilled using agricultural implements, to facilitate the accelerated chemical breakdown of the oil. * Disturbed areas within 100 meters of a water body should be stabilised and re-vegetated to prevent erosion and to intercept sediment. * Riverbanks and fill sloped should be trimmed to a relatively flat angle that will be stable (i e, 2.1 or flatter). * All ground surfaces that have been compacted by heavy machinery or by having been sites of construction camps or plants should be ploughed and raked to ensure that sediment compacton is reversed Impact of Temporary Access Roads Mitigation Objective Minimise the need to construct temporary access roads. Anv temporary access roads that are constructed in or near sensitive areas should be decommissioned and rehabilitated to their original state at the end of the construction period. Description of Mitigation Measures * avoid the impact: Whenever possible, alternatives to building access roads should be considered. For example, the Contractor should be encouraged to use manual transport as much as possible. If access roads cannot be avoided, their routing should avoid sensitive areas. Consultation and agreement with local authority on the number and location of access road and proposed mitigation measures are to be done during Pre-construction. * minimise the impact: Access roads should be designed to avoid run off and sedimentation from grading for access road and alteration of hydrological pattern. the design and construction of assess road must be examined carefully and an appropriate water drainage system will be considered and constructed when needed to avoid alteration of drainage and soil erosion. Sediment traps should be installed where required to control sedimentation. * rectify the impact: After construction is complete, the Contractor should apply measures for road restoration such as clearing and levelling the road surface, replanting grass and trees to restore the original status. For sections traversing forest, manual transport of materials should be considered to minimize impact on the environment Noise and Dust Mitigation Objective Ensure minimal impact of noise and dust on local people and sensitive areas such as hospitals and schools. Description of Mitigation Measures * minimise the impact of dust: 1) Water sprays should be regularly used on piles of sand and dirt roads; 2) Wind fences should be installed if prevailing winds generate dust; 3) Project vehicles carrying materials should be adequately covered. * minimise the impact of noise: 1) Night works will be carefully considered in order to reduce noise to local residents, and especially near sensitive areas such as schools and hospitals, 2) Project vehicles should meet TCVN 5948 (1995) standards for noise emissions; 3) Project Page 27 September 2003

46 Rural Energy I - Phase 11 vehicles should avoid the use of horns in urban areas, 4) Construction equipment should meet relevant standards for noise emissions Impacts Caused By Clearing the Right of Way Mitigation Objective Ensure that the ROW is cleared in a manner that minimize impact on surrounding area (water, soils) and allows for agriculture and other low-canopv activities to occur during operation phase Description of Mitigation Measures * avoid the impact: The Contractor specifications should include a statement that reads herbicides, DDT, and other persistent organic pollutants (POP) will not be used by the Contractor during the Project. * minimize the impact: Clearing methods should be selected to minimize impact of tree cutting and soil erosion. According to the current practice, tree cutting will be selective using mechanical means so that the impacts will be minimized. This method will be strictlv applied for the components where transmission lines have to traverse the forests. * rectify the impact: After the construction is completed, trees with appropriate height and grass will be replanted again in the foundation area and in the temporarily used areas for construction to restore original environment and reduce future soil erosion Environmental Impacts Caused By Construction Workers Mitigation Objective Minimise the environmental impacts that are often caused by large workforces in rural areas. In this Project, three impacts are of concern: 1) the impact in natural forests; 2) the impact of solid waste on water bodies and terrestrial areas; and 3) the impact of faecal coliform on water bodies. Description of Mitigation Measure * avoid impact on natural forests: The bidding documents and the General Conditions of Contract should clearly state that: l) fires are not allowed in the forest areas; 2) Construction workers are prohibitedfrom using trees or other materialsfromforest for cooking or heating; and 3) Construction workers are prohibited from hunting, collecting, or poaching any protected species, or creating unnecessary disturbance of wildlife or vegetation. * minimize the impact of solid waste. Solid waste should be disposed of in a sanitary landfill. The process should involve four stages: 1) separation of all recyclable wastes from the solid waste stream, 2) burning all the non-recyclable wastes in a high temperature incinerator installed at the construction camp site; 3) crushing all unburned residues, and 4) bunral of crushed residues in a pit dug into mounded sediment and covered regularly with a veneer of sediment. * minimize the impact of faecal coliform contamination. The Project should encourage the Contractor design and construct adequate waste management systems for all construction camps. There are two kinds of wastes that are of environmental concern: human waste and solid waste. Human wastes from construction camps are often dealt with by one or more of the below mitigation measures: 1) Portable latrines are usually commercial products that can be rented or purchased from a supplier. They have recently become available in Vietnam. The waste from the portable latrines should be disposed of in a place approved by the Engineer; and 2) Pit latrines should be dug as required for each construction camp. When latrines are full, they will be covered over by soil. Pit latrines should be located at least 100 meters from wells or surface water. If a ground water source is close to the surface, it may be necessary to elevate the latrine using soil or sediment Page 28 September 2003

47 Rural Energy I - Phase II Social Impacts Caused By Construction Workers Mitigation Objective To minimise the social problems and tensions that could occur during the Project. Description of Mitigation Measure minimize the impact: Therc are several approaches to reduce social impacts. These include: o The Employer could encourage the Contractor to employ local women and men in order to diminish the sudden influx of in-migrants. The Project could also be used to train local people for new skills in cases where re-training is required. This will increase employment for the local population and reduce the pressure on existing community infrastructure and resources. The Employer could substantiate their encouragement by stating the General Conditions of Contract: In selecting his personnel, whenever possible, the Contractor is requested to hire qualified residents of the province in which the project is located. o The Employer could recommend local People's Committees and local Unions (e.g. Fatherland Front, Women's Union) to involve construction workers in public campaigns and programs on HIV/AIDS, STDs, drug use, and prostitution. Education and awareness about HIV/AIDS, STDs, drug use and prostitution may help to change the behaviour of workers and thereby promote their health and the health of the community. o The Employer could encourage the integration of workers in communities by creating the conditions necessary for the Contractor to provide off-site camp-style housing and transportation to the construction site. This could come in the form of a pay item allocated to transportation. Alternatively, the Employer could encourage the Contractor to discuss with the People's Committees the possibility of on-site private accommodation. On site accommodation has be favoured in other projects because it brings income for local households and in many cases reduces social conflicts that arise when worker camps are near communities. In cases where workers live in construction camps, the Project should recommend that the Contractor build the camps outside the commune. o In cases where the worker camps are near the communes, the Employer could request that the Contractor provide accurate, timely and regular information about the construction team to the People's Committees in affected areas. With open communication and information, the People's Committees and Contractor will be able to make a joint informed decision about the management of construction crew accommodations. * rectify the impact:-the General Conditions of Contract should state: after the Project finished, all the camps will be completed removed and the camp sites will be rect7fied to their original condition Health and Safety Mitigation Objective #1 To minimise the health and safety problems that could be incurred by construction workers. Mitigation Objective #2 Ensure no electrical shocks to workers or local people during construction phase. Page 29 September 2003

48 Rural Energy I - Phase II Description of Mitigation Measures * minimize health and safety problems in the work camp: Sleeping accommodations should be of adequate comfort, warmth (especially in the mountainous areas), and waterproof (especiallv in the rainv season). If worker camps are providing food, then food should be of adequate hygiene and nutritional level for workers to remain hcalthy and conduct thcir working tasks. The Contractor will need to provide mosquito nets and/or anti-malarial pills for workers in areas with malaria, dengue fever, etc. Sanitation requirements of the camp have already been discussed in other parts of this report. * minimize health and safety problems at the construction site: During the construction, workers' health will be protected in accordance with specific regulation on health and hygiene methods. Each independent work unit will appoint one medical staff with adequate competence to take care of the workers and treat diseases as malaria, typhoid fever, diarrhoea, and other transmitted disease. Mine clearance to be carried out prior to construction for areas with this potential risks identified during survey and design phase. Transport of long MV poles must be handled by special transportation vehicles that should be checked before use in compliance with transportation security regulation. Before starting works on foundations, it is necessary to coordinate with relevant agencies to identify and avoid damage on water pipes, postal cables or power cables during foundation and tower works, standard safety regulations should be strictly followed. As tower work is a manual process, anv remaining sand and broken stones must be cleared so that there are no impacts on future cultivations. Facilities and equipment must be carefully checked in terms of quality and quantity before use. Construction leader needs to appoint a person responsible for secunrty supervision. This person will check production equipment, labour protection facilities and remind every one for care. During the period of energizing the system after the completion of the project, the safety engineer of PC3 will ensure that every step prepared for energizing the system strictly follows the technical and safety regulation in order to avoid electricity shocks for the workers and to ensure the safety of the whole system. * minimise impacts of electrical hazards: The Contractor must contact the Provincial Power Department to make sure that the existing power system has been turned off during the period that they: 1) connect new transmission lines to the existing system, and 2) improve the existing system. Construction Workers must wear safety clothes and tools approved by the Employer. This includes safety shoes, safety hats, gloves, etc. 7.3 Operation Phase -Mitigtion Measures Health and Safety Mitigation Objective #1 To minimise the health and safety problems that are related to electric shock. Mitigation Objective #2 To minimise the health and safety problems that are unrelated to electric shock. Mitigation Objective #3 To minimize the frequency and severity of fire hazards. Description of Mitigation Measure minimize the impact of problems created through health and safety issues unrelated to electric shock: This can be achieved by the following: Page 30 September 2003

49 Rural Energy I - Phase II o For the close monitoring and assisting the Power Service on the operation and maintenance, particularly periodically check ROW, at least one local person will be selected from a commune for the training course. This person after the course will be contracted with Provincial Power Service for the maintenance works. O Regular and ongoing preventive maintenance and fault treatment for the transmission lines and substations. The Provincial Power Service of PC3 will undertake operation management of the line and substations. o Regular and ongoing training on safety, basic techniques of the network operation and environment management should be provided to the operators. Only the successful trainees with training certificate can undertake the management and operation duty. o Regular and ongoing tree cutting/trimming to ensure no trees in ROW are higher than 4m.. This work will be carried out manually to reduce impacts on environment. The use of herbicide for vegetation management will be prohibited. Local authorities, organizations and landowners shall supervise the tree cutting. * minimize the impact of problems created through health and safety issues related to electric shock: This can be achieved by the following: o At least one person from a project commune will be trained on the operation and safetv of the project. o For the communes where local people use electricity for the first time, the pamphlet for the electricity safety will need to be distributed to the people. This practice is currentlv used in the power sector. o A Danger-Waning" sign placed at the foot of every pole and substation; o All the protection equipment in the substation need to be checked and tested periodically according to the operation procedures. o NOT allow the local people to use electnrcity for the trapping of animal or for prevention of intruder. o Appropnrate specification of conductors connecting the house to the LV system. o Surge arresters for over voltage wave protection. o Place automatic breaker on LV side for short circuit and over current protection. o o Place lightning arrestor on appropriate equipment. All the line passing the populated areas, including low voltage, for this project have designed with the cable or insulated wires, so the accident by contacting with the bare conductors have been already minimized. o From every project commune, at least one person will be sent to the training centre for the training course, this person will be contracted with the Provincial Power Services for the routine check of the system in the commune, assisting people with the minor fixing of the electric devices or in-house wires, and collecting the monthly payment of the customers. * minimize the frequency and severity of fire hazards: This can be achieved by the following: o The substation is designed and equipped with fire detection and prevention according to Governrent regulations. o All workers will be trained for fire prevention and fighting. o There shall be regular monitoring for compliance with fire prevention regulations Frequently check the in-house wiring and connection to the system. o To eliminate the fire initiated by the short-circuit, the full protections at both MV and LV sides, whole the system will be disconnected from the grids when faults occur o Periodically check all the protection equipment, in house wiring, and connection Page 31 September 2003

50 Rural Energy I - Phase 11 8 Public Consultation and Disclosure 8.1 The Need and Benefits of Public Consultation and Disclosure The reasons for public consultation and disclosure in the Project are manifold and include: * GOV requirements: Project approval is contingent upon PAHs and local governments to agree: 1) on the scope of the Project, 2) to participate in the Project, and 3) to pav the connection and operating costs for the Project. It is expected that the proposed public consultation and disclosure, process will improve channels of communication between stakeholders and thereby enable PAHs and local govemments to support the Project. * WB requirements: According to OP 4.01, borrowers of Category B projects are to make available the Category B environmental review summary to PAHs and local NGOs. This needs to be done in a timely manner prior to consultation and in a form and language that are understandable and accessible to the groups being consulted. Category B projects are also required to make their environmental information available through World Bank InfoShop. In addition to satisfying the above requirements, the benefits of a public consultation and disclosure programme include: 1) reduced risk of misunderstanding/tension between stakeholders; 2) Improved effectiveness of the environment management plan; and 3) improved social and economic benefits for Project beneficiaries; and 4) reduced risked of Project delays. 8.2 Public Consultation and Disclosure Activities during Pre-Construction During project preparation stage ( ), the following activities were carried out Activity 1: Information & Discussion with Local Authorities on the Line Route During the field survey for the FS, the consultant discussed project line routes with commune authorities in order to find the best route with the minimum need for compensation and minimum negative impact on the environment. After the preliminary alignments were designed, the consultants sent alignment information to the communes for their further comments Activity 2: Impact Survey and Statistics Based on the agreed-upon alignment, survey teams detailed the alignment route on site and coordinated with the commune officials to make a list of PAHs' affected land and crops. The socioeconomic survey forms were delivered to affected households. The survey was carried out by the District Compensation Committee, with the participation of the commune authority Activity 3: Meetings with PAHs When the survey was completed, Distnrct Compensation Committee (in coordination with the commune officials) held meetings with PAHs having land in the line ROW and with village representatives. During the meetings, the Consultant presented numerous materials, including: Project Summary, draft RAP and draft EIA, maps of the project site, figures, tables, photos, pictures. and other support materials. Meeting officials informed participants of the Project purpose; presented the Project impacts on land and crops in detail; introduced the principles and policies of compensation and advised people not to build new structures in the line ROW. PAHs were consulted on the entitlement policy, property affected, and the compensation amount to each household. Questions posed by the PAHs were addressed and recommendations/concerns of PAHs and PC were recorded. Page 32 September 2003

51 Rural Energy I - Phase II Activity 4: Receiving Further Feedback from PAHs All interested parties submit their comments and concems to the Project components through their authorized representatives, e.g. governmental agencies (the People Committee, People Council) and/or socio-political organizations (Fatherland Front, Farmers Association, Women Union etc.) or non-governmental organizations (e.g. Vietnam Association for the Conservation of the Nature and Environment, Biological Association, Economic Association, Foresters Association etc.). These organizations collect all comments from the local people and send them to the environmental management authorities (DoNRE at provincial level or MoNRE at central level) or even to provincial People's Council or National Assembly. During the environmental review process, all comments and requirements should be discussed and conclusions be reported to the PMU, so that the project can develop proper alternatives and implement measures for mitigation of the negative impacts Activity 5: Approval and Clearance of the RAP After working with the communes, the draft compensation document was sent the Provincial Steering Committee, which includes: Finance-Pnrcing Department, Planning and Investment Department, Agriculture and Rural Development Department and DoNRE. The committee reviewed documents and recommended to the Chairman of the People Committee for signing the compensation document Activity 6: Consultation and Clearance on EIA The Project will receive an investment license only after appropriate modification of location, design, capacity and/or technology of the project to meet the requirement of environmental protection and resettlement. To address disclosure requirements of OP 4.01, PC3 will: * Provide Vietnamese-language copies of the EIA report, RAP, and Project Summarv to each commune-level and provincial-level People's Committee in the Project area. o Advertise in major local newspapers several times over a two-month period. The advertisement will state the EIA, RAP, and Project Summary is available for public review for a two month period during normal working hours at the following locations: 1) the provincial-level People's Committees; and 2) The commune level Peoples' Committees. * English and Vietnamese-language copies of the EIA report will also be sent to the Vietnam Information Development Centre at 63 Ly Thai To in Hanoi, for access by NGOs and public. * English language copies of the EIA report will be sent to World Bank for publication on World Bank InfoShop. 8.3 Public Consultation and Disclosure Activities during Construction and Operation The following consultation and disclosure activities are planned during construction and operation: Activity 1: Information Dissemination/Consultation for Local Authorities PMU will assist the Provincial Steering Committees to organize meetings with involved departments of the project provinces to: 1) discuss all the aspects of the project, including implementation of RAP, EIA, implementation planning of the project; 2) consult with local authorities on potential solutions to avoid conflicts and implementation delays Activity 2: Information Dissemination/Consultation to PAHs PMU will assist the Provincial Project Steering Committees to organize meetings with local people to 1) disseminate information on the Project's environment impacts, land acquisition and other impacts induced during construction as well as operation of the Project; 2) consult with PA-Is on potential solutions to avoid conflicts and implementation delays. Page 33 September 2003

52 Category,B EIA EVN and PC 3 Rural Energy I - Phase II 9 Environmental Management Plan 9.1 Mitigation Plan When constructing the mitigation measure tables of this section, the followving points wvere considered: 1) Mitigation measures are provided for all "MINOR NEGATIVE" and "MITIGABLE" impacts; 2) Construction mitigation measures should be woven into appropriate contract management documents (e.g. bidding documents, general conditions of contract, contractor specifications. method statements). This enables PMU to have significant authoritv over their implementation Pa'ge 34 September 2003

53 Rural Energy I - Phase 11 Table 9.1: Pre-construction - potential negative impacts and mitigation measures Potential Negative Funding Impact Target Mitigation Measure(s) Estimated Cost Source Implemented By Supervised By 1 Project Affected All PAHs will be fairly Select alignment with minimum conflict with PAHs As specified in GOV Provincial and PMU, PC 3 Households (PAH) compensated Compensate PAHs ReseAtlement Commune Compensate ~~~~~~~~~~~Action Plan. Peoples' Committees 2. Land acquisition Land acquisition will be Select alignment with minimum conflict with land As specified in GOV Provincial and PMU, PC 3 minimised. acquisition requirements. Resettlement Commune Land owners will be fairly Compensate land owners Action Plan. Peoples' compensated for loss of l,nd. Committees 3 Health risks related to No humans are harmed due Appropriate government agency will conduct survey of Appropriate GOV Appropriate PMU, PC 3 mines and from dangerous/toxic dangerous/toxic substances in and near the Project area government government unexploded ordnance substances. All dangerous/toxic substances will be removed prior to agency will agency (UXO) initiation of construction. estimate 4 Clearing ROW Minimise impact of burning Co-ordinate with local government to support education Included in GOV Contractor PMU, PC 3 waste during clearing of ROW and enforcement of restricting burning of organic waste in Contractor the ROW. bidding price Page 35 September 2003

54 Rural Energy I - Phase 11 Table 9.2: Construction - potential negative impacts and mitigation measures Potential Negative Funding Implemented Impact Target Mitigation Measure(s) Estimated Cost Source By Supervised By 5 Soil Erosion Project does not exacerbate Contractor Specifications should include: Included in WB Contractor PMU, PC 3. the severity and frequency of - otatrdonre land.sides; local people can * Excavation activities in erosion-prone areas will be bidding price landsiduet se; hirln limited to the dry season and/or after harvest,.idn rc continue to use their land without net loss in productivity;. Soil disturbance will be kept to a minimum and not natural environment is not undertaken until immediately prior to works starting in permanently affected by soil that area. erosion. * During construction, surface runoff will be redirected around construction area.. Excess soil should be dumped in approved locations by a responsible authority. 6 Petroleum and Members of the public and Employer should encourage Contractor to use 'best Included in WB Contractor PMU, PC 3. Hazardous Waste workers are not harmed by practices' to minimise hazardous waste spills - as Contractor DoNRE Spills direct or indirect contact with described in the EIA report. bidding price petroleum or hazardous Contractor Specifications should include: wastes.. Contractor shall not use PCBs and asbestos during any part of Project construction. Contractor shall keep petroleum products and hazardous substances in safe locations away from the general public. 7 Temporary Loss of Restore all productive land Employer should encourage Contractor to 'use best Included in WB Contractor PMU, PC 3. Productive Land temporarily used during practices' to rehabilitate productive land - as described in Contractor DoNRE construction phase the EIA report. bidding price 8 Impact of Temporary Minimised the need for. Contractor should use alternatives to building new Included in WB Contractor PMU, PC 3 Access Roads temporary access roads access roads (e.g. use existing roads, manually Contractor DoNRE transport materials). bidding price. If access roads must be created, Contractor will design them to ensure minimal run-off, sedimentation, and erosion.. After access road is no longer required by Project, Contractor will rehabilitate to a level which satisfies the Engineer Page 36 September 2003

55 Rural Energy I - Phase 11, Potential Negative Funding Implemented Impact Target Mitigation Measure(s) Estimated Cost Source By Supervised By 9 Noise Nearby residents are not Contractor Specifications should include: Included in WB Contractor PMU, PC 3. disturbed by excessive noise o os-eeaigwrs(sn nie,haycontractor DoNRE levels during construction. * Nmachinery, etc) should not occur between 2200h and bidding price 0700h. * All Project vehicles and noise-generating machinery must meet relevant standards for noise emissions. 10. Dust Nuisance dust emissions are Contractor Specifications should include: Included in WB Contractor PMU, PC 3. avoided. * Water sprays are to be regularly used on piles of sand. Contractor DoNRE * Wind fences to be installed if prevailing winds generate dust. * Dust generating materials will be covered adequately. 11 Impacts Caused by Ensure ROW cleared using Contractor Specifications shoutd include: Included in WB Contractor PMU, PC 3. Clearing the ROW methods that minimise impact.cnrco hl o s Csadabso uigay Contractor DoNRE on surrounding area. Ensure. Contractor shall not use PCBs and asbestos during any bidding price long term viability of ROW part of Project construction vegetation and electrical. Contractor shall selective cut trees, and cut by hand safety. whenever possible.. Contractor shall re-vegetate after transmission and distribution lines installed. 12 Environmental Minimise impacts on natural Contractor Specifications should include: Included in WB Contractor PMU, PC 3 Impacts Caused by forests, solid waste in the Cotractor shall not II fr Contractor DoNRE Construction Workers communes, and faecal trees not allowed to create fires for cooking/heating etc; bidding price coliform in nearby water hunting by construction workers is prohibited bodies.. Contractor shall dispose of solid waste in sanitary landfill.. Contractor shall design and construct adequate sanitation systems for all construction camps. 13 Social Impacts Minimise social problems that Contractor Specifications should include: Included in WB Contractor PMU, PC 3 Caused by Caused could occur during the Project * Contactor should be encouraged to hire local residents Contractor DoNRE by Construction Workers whenever possible bidding price. If deemed necessary by Employer, Contractor should work People's Committees and local Unions to develop social education programme (STDs, drug use). Contractor should provide accurate and timely information about the construction team to the relevant Peoples' Committees Page 37 September 2003

56 Rural Energy I - Phase 11 Potential Negative Funding Implemented Impact Target Mitigation Measure(s) Estimated Cost Source By Supervised By 14 Health and Safety Minimise health and safety Contractor Specifications should include: Included in WB Contractor PMU, PC 3. problems that could be. Construction worker accommodations should be Contractor DoNRE incurred by construction adequately comfortable and warm; mosquitoes nets bidding price workers. should be provided as necessary.. Construction workers should be provided with food of adequate quantity and nutritional value. * All works employed/sub-contracted by Contractor should wear appropriate protective equipment such as gloves and construction hats, waterproof boots to be provided where necessary Ensure no electrical shocks to Contractor Specifications should include: Included in WB Contractor PMU, PC 3 workers or local people during. Contractor shall co-ordinate with Provincial Power Contractor DoNRE construction phase. Department prior to beginning construction works. bidding price. Only qualified persons will install and maintain electrical systems used at the Project site. These people will be clearly identified by their clothing/hardhat. Only approved electrical cables and other pieces of electrical hardware shall be used on the Project site. Page 38 September 2003

57 Rural Energy I - Phase 11 Tal)le 9.3: Operation - potential negative impacts and mitigation measures Potential Negative Funding Implemented Impact Target Mitigation Measure Estimated Cost Source By Supervised By 15. Health and Safety Minimise health and safety. For electric shock: work closely with Power Department To be estimated EVN Local Power PC 3 problems related to electric to periodically check ROW; train at least one person by EVN Department shock, fire hazards, etc. from each commune to monitor power lines; provide appropriate training and certification for staff to operate and maintain power lines and substations.. For fire hazards: design substation with fire detection To be estimated EVN Local Power PC 3 and prevention equipment; train workers in fire by EVN Department prevention and fighting; conduct regular monitoring of fire prevention compliance.. For other hazards: distribute educational pamphlets on To be estimated EVN Local Power PC 3 electrical safety in communes where knowledge of by EVN Department electricity is low; place "Danger-Warning" signs at appropriate locations (e.g. foot of poles, substations), ensure appropriate specifications for MV and LV lines, ensure safety equipment (surge arrestors, lightning arrestors, breakers, insulated wires) are purchased, installed, and maintained; provide training for at least one person in each commune to assist residents with minor in-house repairs. Page 39 September 2003

58 Rural Energy I - Phase 11 Table 9.4: Summary of Project Mitigation Measures Pre-Cons nrucon Phase Mitgaton Measures Select alignment with minimum conflict with PAHs Compensate PAHs Select alignment with minimum conflict with land acquisition requirements * Compensate land owners who must relinquish their land * Conduct survey of dangerous/toxic substances in and near the Project area Co-ordinate with local government to support education/enforcement to restrict burning waste in ROW Constrution Phase Afigadon leasures. Excavation activities in erosion-prone areas will be limited to the dry season and/or after harvest. Soil disturbance will be kept to a minimum, not undertaken until immediately prior to starting works in that area * During construction, surface runoff wll be redirected around construction area * Excess soil should be dumped in approved locations by a responsible authority. Contractor shall not use PCBs and asbestos during any part of Project construction * Contractor shall keep petroleum products and hazardous substances in safe locations away from the public * If access roads must be created, Contractor will design them to ensure minimal run-off, sedimentation, erosion. After access road is no longer required by Project, Contractor will rehabilitate to a level that satisfies Engineer * Noise-generating works (using engines, heavy machinery, etc) should not occur between 2200h and 0700h. All Project vehicles and noise-generating machinery must meet relevant standards for noise emissions. Water sprays are to be regularly used on piles of sand. Wind fences to be installed if prevailing winds generate dust. Dust generating materials will be covered adequately * Contractor shall co-ordinate with Provincial Power Department prior to beginning construction works. Only qualified persons will install and maintain electrical systems used at the Project site These people will be clearly identified by their clothing/hardhat * Only approved electrical cables and other pieces of electrical hardware shall be used on the Project site. Contractor shall selective cut trees, and cut by hand whenever possible. Contractor shall re-vegetate after transmission and distnbution lines installed. Contractor shall not allow fires allowed in forest areas; trees not allowed to create fires for cooking/heating etc; hunting by construction workers is prohibited. Contractor shall dispose of solid waste in sanitary landfill. Contractor shall design and construct adequate sandation systems for all construction camps. Contactor should be encouraged to hire local residents whenever possible. If deemed necessary by Employer, Contractor should work People's Committees and local Unions to develop social education programme (STDs, drug use). Contractor should provide accurate and timely information about the construction team to the relevant Peoples' Committees. Construction worker accommodations should be comfortable and warm; mosquitoes nets should be provided as necessary. Construction workers should be provided wdh food of adequate quantity and nutritional value * All works employed/sub-contracted by Contractor should wear appropriate protective equipment such as gloves and construction hats, waterproof boots to be provided where necessary Operation Phas ridgaim M'easres- For electric shock: work closely with Power Department to periodically check ROW; train at least one person from each commune to monitor power lines; provide appropriate training and certification for staff to operate and maintain power lines and substations * For fire hazards: design substation with fire detection and prevention equipment; train workers in fire prevention and fighting; conduct regular monitoring of fire prevention compliance * For other hazards: distribute educational pamphlets on electrical safety in communes where knowledge of electricity is low, place "Danger-Warning' signs at appropriate locations (e.g. foot of poles, substations); ensure appropriate specifications for MV and LV lines; ensure safety equipment (surge arrestors, lightning arrestors, breakers, insulated wires) are purchased, installed, and maintained; provide training for at least one person in each commune to assist residents with minor in-house repairs Page 40 September 2003

59 Rural Energy I - Phase II 9.2 Monitoring Plan The Project's performance and environmental effects wvill be monitored throughout pre-construction, construction, and operation. Performance monitoring is conducted to evaluate compliance with standard operating procedures (SOP), national standards, and/or contractor management documents. In most cases performance monitoring results are evaluated against cstablished performance criteria. For example a Contractor specification may be to place a tarp over all vehicles that carry soil. The performance monitoring activity could be to count the number of soil-carrying vehicles that use tarps, and compare the result against the Contractor Specification. Environmental effects monitoring is conducted to estimate the impacts of project activities on ambient environmental conditions. For example, total suspended particulate matter (i.e. dust) mav be measured to estimate the degree to which project activities are affecting ambient air qualitv. Detailed monitoring programmes should be developed during Pre-construction. Table 9.5 can be used as a guide to develop the detailed monitoring programmes. Page 41 September 2003

60 Rural Energy I - Phase 11 Table 9.5: Guide for Developing Monitoring During Pre-Construction, Construction, and Operation What Where How When Why 1o is to be monitored? is the parameter to be is the parameter to be is the parameter to Is the parameter to be Cost Responsibility parameteris to be momtored? monitored? monitored? be monitored? monitored? PRE-CONSTRUCTION PHASE Environmental Effects Monitoring 1. Receiving Surface Water In sensitive water local institute contracted to once during dry to create pre-project TSS cost is about USD 4/sample TSS or Turbidity bodies that could be monitor parameters using season and twice understanding of ambient Turbidity meter can be rented for PMU and PC 3 affected by the standard field sampling during rainy receiving waters during about USO 20/day. Project (rivers, lakes). equipment, preservation, season dry and rainy periods Exact locations to be transport, and lab analysis Total cost depends on number of selected during techniques water bodies sampled detailed design phase 2. Dust Generation In communes where Local institute contracted to once before to create pre-project TSP collection equipment and Total Suspended construction work monitor parameters using construction understanding of local operators scan be rented for PMU and PC 3 Particulate (TSP) could affect TSP standard TSP monitoring dust levels about USD 30/day. Total number levels. Exact equipment. of days required depends upon locations to be total number of communes that selected during are selected for monitoring detailed design phase Performance Monitoring 3. Contractor Bid Evaluation Bid proposals of each Environmental management during bidding to ensure that Human Resource Cost: One PMU and PC3 understanding of potential contractor will be quantitatively scored process environmental person-week of time. environmental impacts of the during bid evaluation management is project's construction PMU will review proposals considered by bidders in activities and advise on each bid's their workplan, budget, proposed environmental likely ability to achieve and personnel selection. monitoring activities environmental performance * proposed environmental standards identified in mitigation activities Contractor Specifications. * qualifications and experience Points for each bid's of individuals responsible for environmental management environmental management capability will be awarded These points will include in overall evaluation of each proposal. 0 Whenever possible, unut pnces should be based on Circular 83/2002f1T-BTC. Stipulating the Collectioni, Submissioni, and Managemeint of Fees ior Standard Methiodology and Quality Page 42 September 2003

61 Category B EIA Rural Energy I - Phase 11 EVN and PC 3 What Where How parameter When is to be monitored? is the Why parameter to be is the parameter to be is the parameter to Is the parameter. to monitored? be Cost' monitored? Responsibility be monitored? monitored? CONSTRUCTION PHASE Environmental Effects Monitoring 4. Receiving Surface Water same as pre- same as pre-construction same as pre- evaluate impacts of Human Resource same Cost: as pre-construction PMU and PC3 construction monitoring construction monitoring construction on monitoring receiving Depends upon number of water monitoring waters, compare results bodies sampled with pre-construction data Financial Cost: Depends upon number of water 5. bodies sampled Dust Generation same as pre- same as pre-construction two times per year evaluate impacts of Human Resource Cost: same as pre-construction EVN, as part of construction monitoring during construction monitoring)\ construction on local dust monitoring Depends on number of their quarterly levels communes sampled reports Financial Cost: Depends on Contractor, as part number of communes sampled Performance of SEMP Monitoring 6. Site Environmental throughout Project Contractor submits SEMP throughout Management Provides Plan an (SEMP) accountable area Human Resource Cost: (e.g as 5 a method Contractor statement) construction system for monitoring months PMU/EVN time to monitor Successful implementation of to PMU for approval. This SEMP. Specific monitoring and evaluating the and report on SEMP submission activities items are should the include measures degree to who which will monitor, how they Contractor EVN Idntiiems a tile m gatsplan will monitor, when they will Specifications identified in the Mtigation monitor, and the table of for environmental (see Table 9.4: Summary of protection are being Mitigation Measures). contents for the quarterly monitoring report implemented PMU reviews and approves SEMP when satisfactory. Contractor implements SEMP as per approved plan. Contractor writes SEMP report on implementation of mitigation measures PMU and PC 3 conduct onsite monitoring of mitigation measures, and reviews/ approves SEMP reports. OPERATIONS PHASE Environmental Effects Monitoring NONE Page 43 September 2003

62 Rural Energy I - Phase 11 What Where How When Why parameter is to be monitored? is the parameter to be is the parameter to be is the parameter to Is the parameter to be Cost' Responsibility monitored? monitored? be monitored? monitored? Performance Monitoring 7. Health and Safety At Project communes Data can be collected either Ongoing Information collected can Human Resource Cost: * Number of accidents caused through Commune Peoples' be used to improve/focus Depends upon number and by electric shock Committee or Local Power health and safety severity of accidents for each * Number of fires created as a Department. Collaboration education and commune. result of Project's electrical with local hospitavhealth enforcement programmes services clinic may be advantageous. at each commune. * Other types of accidents created as a result of Project's electrical services 8. Effectiveness of Electricity At Project communes Local people can lodge Ongoing Information collected can Human Resource Cost: Commune Services complaints either through be used to improve Depends upon number and Peoples' Number and type of complaints Commune Peoples' effectiveness of electricity severity of complaints for each Committee, Local raised by local people in the Committee or Local Power services at commune commune Power Project area Department level. Department, Page 44 September 2003

63 Category_B.EIA EVN and PC 3 Rural Energy I - Phase Institutional Framework for Environmental Management Project Implementation Framework The institutions and offices responsible for preparation and implementation of the EMP arc: * Electricity of Vietnam (EVN) * Power Company No 3 (PC3) Project Management Unit of PC3 (PMU) Provincial People's Committee (PPC) * District People Committee (DPC) * Commune People Committee (CPC) * Consultant * Construction Contractors The responsibilities and roles of the above institutions are specified as followings: Electricity Vietnam Electricity of Vietnam (EVN) is responsible for the implementation of Rural Energy Project, including overall environmental management of the project. To carry out overall environment management, within EVN, there is an Environmental Management Department in EVN's Centre for Information Technology, Science and Environment. The department is in charge of guiding and supervising implementation of the EMP for the project. Power Company No. 3 Power Company No. 3 (PC3) is the Project. owner for Rural Energy Project's central region. PC3 is responsible for the project implementation, including implementation of RAP and EMP. Project Management Unit of PC 3 Project Management Unit (PMU) is responsible for Project implementation. PMU responsibilities include: * Overall planning, management and monitoring of the environmental management * Ensuring that all environmental protection and mitigation measures of environmental impacts are carried out in accordance with policies, regulations on environment and other relevant laws. * Coordinating with provinces' people committees, provinces' power services, districts' people committees... in environmental management activities. * Being in charge of organizing training courses of local staff (provinces, districts) and contractors' teams on mitigation measures and safety methods (inviting professional expert on environment shall.be included). * Carrying out intemal monitoring and supervise indepcndent monitoring, which will be contracted with other consulting services of the project. * Supervising and providing budget for monitoring activities. * Reporting on the environmental information to EVN, the concemed DOSTE and the WB. * Implement changes or adjustments according to DoNRE recommendations to protect the environment according to Vietnam's standards, laws, and regulations. Pa'ge 45 September 2003

64 Category,B EIA EVN and PC 3 Rural Energy I - Phase 11 Consultant The Consultant will be selected and managed by PC 3 to conduct several Project tasks, including: * Preliminary survey and designs * Preparation of feasibility study * Preparation of RAP and EIA report * Preparation of some bidding documents * Carry out some EMP tasks, and assist PMU with environmental issues during construction Provincial Power Services Provincial Power Services (PPS) are provincial-level dependent utilities of PC3. PPS is responsible EVNs business within each province. For the Rural Energy Project, the PPS will be in charge of the supervision of the contractors during the construction and will be in charge of the operation of the project. For the EMP, the PPS is directly in charge of the supervision of the implementation during the construction stage, and implement of this plan during the operation stage. Civil Works Contractor The Civil Works Contractor (Contractor) will be selected by PMU and approved by PC3. Their responsibility includes Project construction works and following all contractor specifications outlined in the EIA and EMP. This includes: * Applying construction-phase mitigation measures * Ensuring safetv of construction workers and local people dunng construction * Following Vietnam and World Bank policies on environmental protection during construction Project Monitoring of EMP An independent monitoring consultant (IMC) will be hired by PMB to monitor implementation of the EMP[RAP Other EMP Stakeholders Department of Natural Resources and Environment (DoNRE) DoNRE is responsible for state management on environmental issues within each province's territory. As part of this responsibility, DoNRE will review and manage the GOV's approval process for the ELA report. This process is described in CP 490/1998frT-BKHCNMT Circular Letterfor Setting Up and Appraising the Environmental Impact Assessment Report for Investment Projects. During EMP implementation, DoNRE will act as extemal regulator. Their duties will include: * Monitoring the implementation of mitigation measures to minimize the project impacts in the construction and operation stage * Controlling and checking health of workers, operators and inhabitants * Managing and checking protection measures for plantations and animal subject to the impact caused by the project Provincial People's Committee (PPC) The PPC's responsibilities include: * Guiding and monitoring environmental management planning and implementation within the province Page 46 September 2003

65 Category-B EIA EVN and PC 3 Rural Energy I - Phase II * Approving method of environmental protection and impact mitigation including estimated costs after DoNRE appraisal * Reviewing document on environmental activities and granting within the province area * Provide guidance and leading the coordination between sectors and departments in EMP implementation * Approving the unit price for the compensation * Financing the compensation costs District People's Committee (DPC) The DPC's responsibilities include: Ratifying methods of environmental protection and management * Coordinating with DoNRE on supervision of implementation process of environmental impact mitigation and protection during and after construction phase * Carrying out the detailed measurement survey Communes' People's Committees (CPC) The CPC's responsibilities include: * Confirming impact caused by the project in the commune * Monitoring environmental impact mitigation and protection process within the commune * Organizing meetings at commune level on matters concerning environment Project Affected Households (PAHs) PAHs will directly participate in the survey on PAHI duties and entitlements. Through these surveys they will: 1) have the opportunity to express their requirements and concerns to the above institutions; and 2) have input to the method and units of compensation. After compensation is complete, PAHs are responsible for co-operating with Contractor to clear relevant sites in a timely manner. In addition to their own duties and entitlements, PAHs have the right to participate either directly or indirectly in the Project decision-making process during pre-construction, construction, and operation. In order to ensure that PAHs are well informed on the Project, local authorities will provide PAHs with basic knowledge on Project-related activities, and the negative and positive impacts they can have on the natural/social environment. PAHs will be allowed to bring legal action to an appropriate court if the PAH considers its claim for participation or information is ignored, groundlessly refused, or if provided information by local authorities was inadequate. 9.4 Environmental Reporting Procedures PMU will submit Project quarterly reports to the EVN and WB. The reports will include updates on the effectiveness of enviromnental mitigation measures being carried out, environmental monitoring results collected during the quarter, and a discussion of any outstanding issues which should be addressed in the forthcoming quarter. The format and detail of these reports will be discussed and agreed upon by EVN and WB prior to Project implementation. PMU will submit an annual environmental report to EVN and the WB. The report will summarise environmental protection measures implemented, problems encountered, actions taken to resolve environmental problems and the results of environmental monitoring. Page 47 September 2003

66 Rural Energy I - Phase II IMC will closely monitor the implementation of RAP and EIA. In case of accident or risk of environment. The IMC will report the results of their work everv six months during the Project period. The report will be sent to PMU, DoSTEs, DPCs and EVN and WB for review. 9.5 Capacity Building Environment management is a relativelv new task for the power sector. Therefore, prior to project implementation, there should be training for staff that will participate in EMP. Management staff will be equipped with knowledge on mitigation measures for environmental impact and monitoring plan. The following training has been conducted to date: 1) 2000: Project Launch Workshop. The main objective of the was to inform all the implementing agencies on the safeguards policies of the Bank, including the environmental issues of the project 2) May 2002: Training Workshop on the environmental issues, conducted bv intemational and national environmental specialists. The objectives of the training were: * Legal documents on environment protection * WB stipulations on safeguard policies * Responsibilities and rights of state functional bodies in environment management * Identification of typical impacts of power transmission line projccts and mitigation measures 3) August 2003: Hands-on learning-by doing training for improving environmental reports. Local and intemational consultants worked with PC 3 staff to improve draft EIA and EMP reports. 4) September 2003: Hands-on workshop for environmental assessment of transmission and distribution projects. International and national environmental specialists lead PC 3 staff and other participants on a field trip to test new tools for environmental assessment, held group work activities on challenges and opportunities to improve environmental assessment, and held lectures on WB safeguard policics and GOV environmental requirements for the Project. Future training includes the following: 5) Commune-level training: At least one person from a commune will attend a course that will provide training on (i) the basic operation of the power system for the safety of the users of the electricity, and (ii) environmental monitoring during the operation of the system to prevent the fire, electric shocks, and maintenance of the ROW. 6) EVN training. Intemal training course on how to monitor SEMPs and how to report environmental results as part of quarterly and annual project reports. 9.6 Cost of Implementing the EMP This section estimates the marginal costs for conducting the EMP's main sub-components mitigation, monitoring, and capacity building. Costs that are incurred by other project components but satisfy some aspect of the EMP are not included in this section. The division of costs between EVN and IDA funds was developed in consultation with EVN. The total marginal cost of the EMP from Pre-Construction through to the end of the first year of operation is 123,800 USD (not including contingencies, taxes, or inflation). This amount is about 0.6% of the project's estimated USD 22.7 million budget. EMP costs can be broken down as follows. Pre-Construction (9,000 USD); Construction: (89,800 USD), and Operation 25,000 USD/year. More detailed estimates are found in Table 9.6. Page 48 September 2003

67 Category.B EIA EVN and PC 3 Rural Energy I - Phase 11 Table 9.6: Costs of Implementing the EMP Pre-Construction Construction Operation (per year) EVN IDA EVN IDA EVN IDA 1. tfigatlon (see Pflgabon Plan for reference nwnners) 5. Soil Erosion - 2,000 10, Petroleum and hazardous wastes - - 2,000 10, Environmental impacts of - - 3,000 18,000 - construction workers 13. Social impacts of construction - 3,000 18,000 - workers 14&15 Health and safety impacts - - 1,000 6,000 20,000 EVN time to supervise/report on mitigation measures Sub-total Mitigations ,400 62,800 20, Monitoring (see MonrtoGng Plasn for reference numbetrs 1&4. Water quality surveys 400 1, ,600-2&5. Dust surveys 600 2, , SEMP monitoring , Health and safety Effectiveness of electncity ,200 EVN time to supervise/report on monitoring results Sub-total Monitoring 1,400 4, ,600 2, Capacity Buiding PMU and EVN capacity building Commune level capacity building 400 1, ,600 1,000 Additional workshop/training costs , Sub-total Capacity Building 600 2,200 1,600 6,200 1,600 TOTAL COSTS , : Unit Cost Assumptions Item Unit Unit Cost (USD) National Consultant (fees and expenses) 1 month 1,000 EVN env staff (salary and training honorariums) 1 month 400 This budget does not include the costs of hosting training activities 1,2,3,4 from "Capacity Building" section. Page 49 September 2003

68 Rural Energy I - Phase 11 Annex 1: List of EA Report Preparers A1.1 Central Region Rural Energy Project Management Board Tran Dinh Nhan Le Thi Phuong Cam Phan Cong Tien Director Specialist Specialist A1.2 Consultant Agencies A1.2.1 Power Engineering Consulting Company No.4 (PECC4) Pham Minh Son Nguyen Dua Tu Quang Truong Le Viet Minh Director Head of Project Head of Project Head of Project A1.2.2 Electrical Design Centre under Power Company No.3 (EDC-PC3) Tran Thanh Hung Tran Van Chien Pham Minh Nhut Phan Van Hung Phamn Tan Hai Director Deputy Director Director of Design Department Head of Project Head of Project A1.2.3 Power Engineering and Investigating Enterprise under Power Engineering Consulting Company No.1 (PECC1) Nguyen Huu Duong Dang Thanh Lien Cao Ngoc Chau Director Head of Project Head of Project A1.2.4 WB Consultant Jay Roop WB Consultant Page 50 September 2003

69 Category-B EIA EVN and PC 3 Rural Energy I - Phase II Annex 2: References A2.1 Written Materials Both Published and Unpublished Used in Study Preparation 1 Feasibility Study of REP-Stage 2 2. Resettlement Action Plan (RAP) of REP-Stage 2 3. WB Policies on Environment: * OPN Cultural Property * OP 4.04 Natural Habitats * OP 4.09 Pest Management * OP 4.12 Involuntary Resettlement * OD 4.20 Indigenous Peoples * OP 4.36 Forestry * BP Public Disclosure * World Bank, Environmental Assessment Sourcebook, Volume 3 * IFC, Environmental, Health, and Safety Guidelines on Electric Power Transmission and Distribution 4. Vietnam Laws on: * Law on Protection of the Environment (LEP) was enacted in 1993 * Decree 175/CP was promulgated in 1994 * Circular No. 490 was promulgated in 1998 * Law on Forest Protection (1992) * Decree 54/1999/ND-CP * Decree 70/1987-HDBT * Decree 24/2000/ND-CP * Decree 52/1999/ND-CP * Decree 26/1996/CP * Tieu Chuan Viet Nam (TCVN) a 18 TCN * 11 TCN-1984 A2.2 Other Materials 1. Vietnam Communist Party with the Doi moi (2003). Government of Vietnam. 2. U.S. EPA, EMF in Your Environment: Magnetic Field Measurements of Everyday Electrical Devices. 3. U.S EPA, Evaluation of the Potential Carcinogency of Electromagnetic Fields; BC Hydro, Electromagnetic Fields; CWTI, News Articles on Links of Power Lines to Cancer. Page 51 September 2003

70 07 :Ez Provincc Place Tirne *Niinibhcr of I Opilioll of PAH.Is to the Pioject attend I IPAHs Qtuano B h Provinicial DOI Office 15/9/ Very happy because their lives will be improved. They aic tiankful Lo the Comnmunist Partv ai the Goverment Quang Tri Provincial DO] Office 29/8/ They are happy because they could enjoy the Project's benefit. They want to be compensated for the impacted assets Quang Nam Narn Giang and Hien District 30/9/ They suggest to build the elerrical People's Committee Office construclion as soon as posible to provide Q a a T30/9/2003. power to thenm befor Luniar vear Quang- Ngaa Ba Tor, Son Ty,Tra Boig and 1/9/ They are wiiling to support the Project [S Ha t District People's implement ion. They believc that their lives Commnittee Office, will be better when they are provided power Gia Lai Gia Lai Electricity; Dak Doa, 43 The[ are happy and hope to have electricity Chit Se and Kr6ng Pa District 29/9/2003 soon-. hey sugoest that the statistics on People's Committee Office affected assets and compensation should be... done fairly Koin Tum Provincial DOI Office; Dak- To 26/8/ Very happy because thei'- lives will be and Kon Plong District 20/9/2003 improved. They are wiiliign o support the People's Commlittee Office Project implementioii Dak Lak Oak N gg, Dak Rlap, Kiong They agree with (he Project Policies. and N6. Ea Kar, M' Drak, KrbWn 9/9/ hope that they could have electricty in the ~~~~~Buk., Ea Hleo, Cu Jut District.Lunar Y'earI Pcople's Commintee Office _ -4

71 UBND TINH QUANG TRI CONG HOA XA HOI CHU NGHIA VI1T NAM Sd KHOA HQC- Doc lap-tu do-hanh phiic CONG NGIE-MOI TRUONG * So': 641]\ )T,Qudang T-i, rigay-f6thang 01 tidm 2003 V/Iv Xac nzhdntdbdn bdo cdo cldinlz gid tdc doing m6i triotng D( dni ndllzg lircang,z6ng th6in KV inieri Trunllg dcrt 2-tiili Qrudnig Tri. Kinh g6i: CONG TY DIEN LU.C 3 - Can cu van ban s6 058 EVN/DL3-DANT ngay 05/01/2002 cua Cong ty Dion IUic 3 ve viec de nghi xac nhan noi dung Ban Bao cao danh gia tac dong moi trtong Dt,r an Nang Wuong nong thon khu vuc mien Trung-dot 2. Sau khi xem xet noi dung Ban Bao cao danh gia tac dong moi trubng Dui an Nang lu,ong nong thon khu vuc mien Trung-dQt 2 do Ban quan ly D Tn Nang luqng nong thon khu vu#c mien Trung-Cong ty Dien luic 3 lap thang 7/2002, Sa Khoa hoe-cong nghe-moi trd6ng tinh Quang Tri c6 y kie'n nhu sau: - Cac cong tr'mh dicn thuoc Dur an Nang luqng nong thon tren dia ban tinh Quang Tri khong anh hiang de'n cac di tich van h6a, lich su cua tinh, anh huang cua viec xay durng cong trinh dien de'n moi tnx0ng la khong dang ke. - Tho'ng nhat v6i n0i dung cua Ban Bao cao danh gia tac dncng moi trlrng DLr an Nang luong nc ng thon khu vuc mien Trung-dol 2. Noi nhan: Tran trono. - Nliic iljl-el. < G.> - Licu lp. t, cg ' 8\ E,;A"0;': j kam DOC V A

72 UBND TINH QUANG TRI CONG HOA XA HOI CHU' NGHIA VIET NAM Sd KHOA HQC- Doc l1p-tiy do-hanh phuc CONG NGHE-MOI TRUONG * So' l/ J14Tt Qua'lig Tri. iiglyi tcn 0 a (0 S6: Qun n gy4 6 ~,hing 0] tidm 2003 Vlv. Xac nlhjnt bdin bdo cdo ddnlh gia tic dtoig m6i trliong Da'dn ntdng lirctizg ndng th6n KV /2ie'll Truing ctit 2-tilih Qiludng Tri. Kinh goi: CONG TY DIEN L14fC 3 - Can ci van ban s6 058 EVN/DL3-DANT ngay 05/01/2002 cua Cong ty Dien Itrc 3 ve viec dd nghi xac nhan noi dung Ban Bao cao danh gia tac dong moi tring Dur an Nang luo, ng nong thon khu virc mien Trung-doct 2. Sau khi xem xet noi dung Ban Bao cao danh gia tac dong moi tru6ng Dir an Nang luong nong thon khu vitc mien Trung-dgt 2 do Ban quan 1 Dir an Nang luiong nong thon khu virc mien Trung-Cong ty Dien luc 3 lap thang 7/2002, S6 Khoa hoc-cong nghe-moi trxdng tinh Quang Tri c6 y kie'n nhu sau: - Cac cong trinh dien thuoc D r an Nang liong nong thon tren dia ban tinh Quang Tri khong Anh htr&ng de'n cac di tich van h6a, lich sit cua tinh, anh hir&ng cua viec xay ditng cong tremh dien de'n moi trurng Ia khong dang ke - Th6ng nhat vdi noi dung cua Ban Bao cao danh gia tac dong moi trlrng Du, an Nang hru`ng n0ng thon khu vurc mien Trung-do, 2. Tran trong. Noi nhan:, r D OC - Nlhictr9ei.. - Lint VP 7 _ ;^,

73 IIIIII of,j 1117,jLC AYI()IIfl2L - j~ii'~lll.~ / ~~~~~~~~~~~~ inps MIOU Thls! LOl 11)1! LI J 3OlL-, DILL LLlLjI3110! ~I1\ I1H 3LOL]~3LLINK lp I) "!''Lj "!''1 ' ?03 ''I' -1 t1 fil' l?! (mci' 3Lhlp IlOUr 0,t1 LI3ijL /J{{{ 1)/' t'1//)17 ///)1/)}/)1/81),) {21)eI 1/})/// }1)(W.-) 'Wk 1 _ill\ Ij I It I t -l *-) I L I.V I L13'.j\0 LIIP.'. 3L1() Jj\J! >i't'll \V)t 1-j>J O1' ThP 111 ttl)i)c *f!l( 1¼)! ' 'I jn 'PI \Chj]C{/ lt \!1c( Ot?!1it '-P \110 PL2i!( (LLL I J lop -? ZUlu 14 3 DILL!~~~~~ 3!' - '1ll L~ lijilt 3110! ~Ill.lOBj NLIPC ZULlOl,5ol.. II8 loll!3k, P DLP'I 1'9~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~J L1t I)l8 )I'tt LLIl -).IIq 1 11i)ll I'?Lkll )LI IO ILI 0 (. IL L.!~\Ni % I,)\Q I,,, MI\,,,,, m,, y, )i( <// / 'P ''1 \ f/il UP( 0I- J_(4 I ) I I ll 1 I 11 I I I II 7, I t I'( /1 II I " '; I L ji/ f I IILL I - '1'!l't1t1ll ' 9 1)t()' '1ill' 1'\ tt1l.l! 11) 'II 5t0 '!) l/ totl 'I/I F; n ' t.1i) '11 FtIl' 1II!'lI~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~IL,f\',1 llt,f II I''/.1 1 I(9 I LI95D-',- LI I 1) L I( I.1 I LILIL -I) I ( i I L II 12(W I16 LILI L. M\,( C ) 2 L-). 1 I 1,01) - -,Ll.J

74 UBND TINH QUANG BSNH C6NG HOA XA HlI CHI- NGHIA VItT NAM Sd KHOA HOC CONG NGH] DOc lap - Tu do - hanh phuic VA MOI TR1Y4NG ooo--- S6& I3 f /SKHCNMT Quang Binh, ngdy 41 thang 6 ndm 2003 V/v j kien d4i v6i B6o cao DTM Dui dn Ndng lilcng n6ng thdn - Khu vtc Mi6n Trung dqr 2 tai Qudng Binh Kinh gi'ri: Cong ty Dien liic 3 Theo d& nghi ciua C6ng ty Dien lirc 3 tai Cong van s6 058/EVN/DL3- DANT ngay 06 thang 01 nam 2003 vd viec d6 nghi xac nhan nti dung BAo cao DAnh gia tac d6ng moi trixbrng Dir An Nang llrong n6ng th6n khu vlxc Mien Trung - -- t 2. Sau khi nghien curu noi dung Bao cao Danh gia tac d6ng m6i tnirng Du An Nang lucrng n6ng th6n khu vuc Mien Trung - dat 2 noi tr8n, S& Khoa hoc, Cong nghe va M6i truing QuAng Binh c6 9 ki6n nh.r sau: 1. Bao cao da tuan thiu theo noi dung hu6ng dan lap bao cao danh gia tac dong m6i trlu6ng do Bo Khoa hoc, C6ng nghe va Moi tro6ng ban hanh. Nhimg tac dong d6n m6i trabng trong qua trinh xay dulig va van h5nh Du An culng nhu cac giai phap giam thie'u tac d6ng tipu cu'c d6n m6i trikrng da dtmrc Chfu Diu an xay diung trong Bao c6o la hgp 1 va c6 tinh kh& thi. 2. Yeu cdu Chu Diu An ph6i hgp v6i ca quan quan 19 nha nurc ve bao ve m6i truwng tie'n hanh giam sat m6i trixrng theo qui dinh. NIi nhdn: KiT GIAM D6C - Nhu tren Sd KHOA HOC, CONG NGHE VA MO6 TR1bNG. - LUru VPIMTg P. GIAM D6C Nguyen Meic Ly

75 UBND TiNH QUANG NGAI CONG( f H()A XA HOI CHfj NGHiA VlIII'NAN'1 SO KHOA HOC,CONG NGH. MCc iap - Tuc do - Hanh phuc VA MOI TRUONG S6: 557SKHCN1MT-MTg Quding N(,Ji. gj-vh 2 1 lheiii 0.2,drn '2003 V/v y kic'n doi v6ii Bao cao danh (ia tac dmng moi tnr6ng Du an nang laroyng nong th6n - khu vrc mien Trung dol 2 tai tinh Quang Ngai Kinh gui: -Cong ty Dien luc 3 Theo yeu cau cua Co5ng ty Dicn luc 3 tai Cong van so" 05.8/EVN/DL3-DANT ngay 05/01/2002 ve viec de nghi xac nhan n6i dung BAo cao danh gia tac d(ng moi trulng dur an Nang ltrung nong thon khu vuc mien Truno - dot. 2. Sau khi nghien cuu noi dung BAo cao danh giai tac dong m0i ti-min) du' an Nano ltrong n6ng th(n khu vuc mien Trung, S& Khoa hoc ^io ngmhe va IMVli trultng Quang Ngai co y' kie'n nhur sau: 1. Bao cao cld tuan thtu theo n6i dung huc6ng d^an lap bmo cao danh gia tac d6no mci trucyng do Bc Khoa hoc Cong nghe va Moti tivtmg ban hanh. Nhung tac Mmcn, clen moi trirurng trong qua trinh xay ding va van hanh du an cung nhu de xuat cac gia"i phcmp gidm thieu tao d;?n d6n moi trmu6,n kha chi cli. va hop 15'. 2. De nghi chu du an ph6i hqp vii S( Khoa hoc CUng nghe va Moi trrn?rng xac clinh vi tri sat 1(0 hoac co kha nang sat 10y de c6 giai phap an toan cho he th (^ng dien. Nai nhdn: / > G(IAM DOC S6 KHOA HOC CON6'( VA M01 TRU)NG - Nlir tren, / - L,uu VT, MTg.., NGHF ran C6ng Anh

76 UBND TINH GIA LAI CONG HOA XA HOI CHU NGHIA VIET NAM SO KHOA HOC- Doc lap - TL do - Hanh ph tic CONG NGHt-MOI TRIfONG *** S6: g6 /lv- r.c" Ci La t_, nigayv tdging 5 nni 2003 V/V.. xcie nhcin Bcio cdio ddin/h gic tiec d6lng ni6i tl 1ra7ng Diadn Ncng lacig n6ng thu5n khii v1.,(c nii 6 i T-lng-dot 2. Kinh guii: Cong ty Dien ltrc 3. - Can cui van ban s6 058 EVN/DL3-DANT ngay 5/1/2002 cua C6ng ty Dien Itrc 3 ve viec de nghi xac nhan noi dung Bao cao danh gia tac dong moi trnurng Duy an Nang luang Nong thon khu vuc mien Trung-dcrt 2. Sau khi xem x6t noi dung Bin Bao cao danh gia tac dong m6i trur6ng Dui ani Nang luong nong thon Di ain Nang Iuang nong thon khu vuc mien Trung-dot 2 do Ban quan 1y Du ain Nang luang nong thon khu vwc mien Trung-Cong ty Dien lrc 3 lap thang 7/2002, S& Khoa hoc-cong nghe-moi truang tinh Gia Lai c6 v kien nhlu sau: - Cac cong trinh dien thuoc Dir an Nang luang nong thon tren dia ban tinh Gia Lai khong anh huang de'n cac di tich van h6a, lich siu cua tinh, viec Anh huang de'n moi truing la khong dang ke. - Tho'ng nhat v6i n6i dung cua BAn Bao cao danh gia tac dong moi trlrurng Dur An Nang hucong nong thon khu vwc mien Trung-dat 2. Tran trong. Noi nhan: IAM DOOC - Nhit tr~11. - Latu VP. / -, K~~~~~~~~ X,~ S

77 Uy ban nhan dan tinh Kontum CONG HOA XA HOI CHU' NGHIA VIET NAM SO KHCN&MT Doc lap - Ttr do - Hanh phuc. o o- S6J:. /PXN-MTg Kontum, ngay 2Gthang 06 ndm 2003 PHIEU XAC NHAN BAN DANG KY DAT TIEU CHUAN MOI TRUONG Cua dir an: Nang Irong n6ng thon khu vic mien Trung - dot 2 (Phan thirc hien a tlnh Kontum) GIAM D6C S6 KHOA HOC, CONG NGHE VA MOI TRJONG TINH KON TUM XAC NH AN Dieu 1: Ban QLDA nang ltrcng nong thon khu viuc mien Trung da trinh B'an dang ky dat tieu chuan moi truang du an Nang luang nong thon khu vlrc mien Trung - dct 2 (Phan thuc hien tai tinh Kontum) vao ngay 19 thang 06 nam Dieu 2: Chu du an c6 trach nhiem thuyc hien dung nhung noi dung dc dduc neu trong Ban dang ky dat tieu chuan moi trubng v2 cac yeu cau kem theo phie'u xac nhan nay. Dieu 3: B'an dang ky dat tieu chuan moi tru6ng ciua du, an Ia cc sa de So Khoa hoc Cong nghe va Moi tru&ng ki,em tra viec thurc hien bao ve moi tru&ng cfua duy an. Dieu 4: Sau khi hoan thanh cac hang muc cong trinh, Chiu du an phai c6 bao cao bang van ban guri S& Khoa hoc Cong nghe va Moi truttng de kie'm tra./. Noi nhan: -Chu dur dn -Thanh tra S& (dd bi6t) -Luu VT,QLMT. SO KHOA HOC CONG NGHt VA MOI TRUJONG KT/GIAM DOC 9; y. \ 'cjz..,2{2, / z'

78 Uybn ti-e~ontum in CONG HOA XA HOI CHU NGHIA VIET NAM Doc lap - Ttr do - Hanh phuc.,,~~~ ooo <-- CAC YEU CAU VE CONG TAC B'AO VE MOI TROJNG DOoi v6i Dut an: Nang Iluong nong thon khu vtre mie'n Trung - dot 2 (Pha'n thtuc hin 0' tbnh Kontum) (Yeu ca'u kem theo Phieu xac nhdn Ba'n ddng ky dgt tieu chua"n moi truo6ng so', Ot IPX N- MTg ngay f-0thang 06 nam 2003) I.Trong qua teinh hoat do.ng c'ua dur an ca'n han che' tie'ng o'n d'am b'ao clat muic quy dinh theo tieu chuan Viet Nam TCVN ; 2.Hoat dong xay durng se phat sinh ra't nhie'u bui, ch'u dur an co bie.n pha'p han che' phat ta'n bui, khf tha;i trong qua teinh hoat dong dclam b'ao'dat muc q'ui dinh theo tieu chuan Viet Nam TCVN ; 3.Pha'i b-o' trf he. tho'ng thoat nlu6c cac dtu6ng tam de' xay durng tru, tranh einh trang nludc mura ch'ay tran gay sat Ia, 6 nhie7m moi tnrtrng; 4. Viec xay durng dur an cli qua nhie'u khu vtrc c6 rurng, ch'u dui an pha'i bao cao cac co hdc qan angdia hucng e po' hp trong viec phat tuye'n thi cong, dac biet Ia cong teinh cgp clien xa Pb E, huyen KonPlong va cong tiinh ca'p dien xa Ngoc Laty, huyen Dak To; 5. Khi dur an di vao hoat dong ph'ai thurc hie.n vi-ec gia'm sat moi trtudng dinh ky theo b'an dang ky dat tieu chuan moi trlr6-ng hoac gia'm sa't dot xua't khi c6 dgu hie.u gay 6 nhiem m6i tnrtrng. Ke't qu'a gu'i ve' S& KHCN&MT de' theo doi; 6.Trong qua' tr'inh triedn khai dur a'n ne'u pha't hien da'u hieu x'ay ra sur cff ve m6i trudbng can phai bao cao vdi S& KHCN&-MT tinh Kontum de pho'i hcrp giai quy6t./.

79 UBND TINH QUANG TRI Sd CONG NGH1P CONG HOA XA HOI CHU NGHIA VIET NAM Doc MIp - Ttr do - Hanh phuc S6 3jZ/CV-CN Dong Hd, ngacy -A thlazg 10 ndm 2003 V/v c6ng b6 tai lieu RAP va EIA Kinh zcri: Cong ty dien lutc 3 Theo de nghi c'ua Cong ty dien lic 3 ve cong bo6 tai lieu Bao cdo ddnh gia tic dong moi tru6ng (EIA) va Ke hoach hanh dong tai dinh cu (RAP) Dur an Nang lllgng nong thon khu v.uc mien Trung drt 2 tai Cong van s EVN/DL3- DANT ngay 19/8/2003, sau khi tiep nhan tai lieu, Sa Cong nghiep da nhan ban tai lieu va tridn khai cdng b6: - Dja diem cong b6: T6 chcrc niem yet thong bao tai Phong tiep dan c'ua Sa, tai cac Tru sa lam viec cila Ban giai phong mat bang cac dia phuicrng, dong th6i thong qua cdn bo truc tiep thirc hien cong tac den bu giai ph6ng mat bang de thong tin va giai thich cac n.i dung chcu ye?u c'ua tai lieu. - Thai gian thurc hien cong b6: Tur 25/8-25/9/2003 Di in Nang larng nong thon giai doan 1 da,t 2 a Quang Tri gom 7 dui an, trong d6 6 dlr in dang dtrac trien khai thu#c hien thuoc 2 huyen mien Nui Hti6ng Hoa va Dakrong. Cong iac kh'ao sit thiet kv ctua dan vj tu van thirc hien trong dat 2 sat va hop 1y han nen hu6ng tuy6n cac d,u an d6u tranh di vao nha dan. Do vay, cong tac giai ph6ng mat bang giam dua. c cong-viec thluc hien tai dinh cu', chi thurc hien den biu. Thiet hai dt giai phong mat bang trong dat 2 khong 16n, chiu yeu.a cay c6i hoa mau. Sau khi cong b6 duac nhan dan d6ng tinh, viec th6ng ke thiet hai kha thuan hai, den nay khong co y~ kie'n thac mac gi. Vay, Sa Cong nghiep Qu'ang Tri xin bao cao mat s6 thong tin theo n6i dung ndu tren de quy Cong ty biet./. Ncri nhan: GIAMDOC6 s( - Nhu trdn -T LruVVT, NL THAI V!NH KHA'NG

80 UBND tinih Kontum CONG 1-1OA XA HOI CHU NGHIA VIET NAM SO CONG NGHIEP DOc lap - Tur do - Hlianli phiuc So6. / CV-CN Konitum, ngay/itluing A rndin 2003 Vlv bao cdo kei qud cong bo ht li.e RAP va EIA diaen NLNT dat 2 Kinh guri: Cong ty Dien lutc 3 Thirc hien cong van so" 4266 EVN/DL3-DANT, ngay 17/9/2003 cua Cong ty Dien lurc 3 ve viec thong bao ket qu'a cong bo' tai lieu RAP va EIA dur ain NLNT dol 2. Sa Cong nghiep Kontum thong bao k6t qua lilrc hien nhir sau Ngay sau khi nhan cong van so" 3739/EVN/DL3-DANT, ng,iy 19/8/2003, Sa Cong nghiep da trien khai cuoc hlop giura cac bo phan lien quan ve viec thirc hien cong tac DB GPMB cac cong triniii dit an NLNT giai (doan I dcrt 2 (le cong bo' tai lieu RAP va EIA dir in NLNT d(it 2 tai vi-n ph6ng Sc COing nghlcp. Sau d6, trien khai trltc tie'p di CaiC hiiyuyi/tlli va cac xa c6 dlr aim de coing bo' ti lieu, v6i ke't qua sau * Dia diem c6ng bc6'. - Tai van phong S Cong nghiep ( trii 6 n khai cho ci.c do(i1g chi lien quan den thlrc hien cong tac DB GPMB, thong bao tai van ph6ng, dain cong khai tai ph6ng KT-GSDN) - Tai van ph6ng UBND cac huycn/ thi xa c6 dr iin - Tai van ph6ng UBND cac xa c6 dur an. * TIz&i g'iai tliatc hin c1 Ci0g b1x.- - Tu ngay 26/8/2003 d6n 20/9/2003 * Y kiil cua ngad'i ddini d(ji VCi mnuiic fieu di( dii, ccic chin/h s.cli v'da d,il hmdng clia di( C7/ Tai cuoc hop cong bo' tai lieu cua cac xa c6 dir an di qua, dai dien UBND xa, dai dien cac thon, lang da lang nghe cac noi dung cua tai lieu RAP, EIA, t't ca' moi ngirai dan deu rat hlai l6ng v6i nhcrng chinh sach, quyen lri Vtl inh hlr&ng cua dir an. Ngoai ra khong c6 y kie'n gi khaic. Tren day la toan b6 bao cao ve ket qua cong bo' tai lieu RAP va EIA dir an NLNT dqt 2./. Noi nfian: - Nhur trdn; - Luru VT. PKT. SO CONG NGHIEP KONTrUM PHi6 G,Ams E)C6, A,

81 L'BN fh,'ds' i;t NAM SoN Gng b t/v HI ibt RAP va' e n pt 9Nci2j O: ~~~-SCN S4 :>da i t c U' trng Tihc IA, RP v eo yeu,cnu cuxa Co dugtyu. ln;c.eicn 3 taic'n line tevn/dl3- DANTna'v 19/8/2003 V/v c6nutn tei lie u RAPA `EIA t. -an NLqNT dn t 2; xa co iong nghiep d sd gvai Cc cr UN de in trong Tynh c6 c6no* trinh toanc DL! dn cnhie, Wthu, nrcong bo: Tu b RAP va. EIA,i.S./ dqncui cdc Eiadie cng o,ta di m you' vau an,n UBNDa ir" cac d B 'tai lieu ahhyn trcn tai dia ba'n-18 xd ciua tinh Dak Ldk,``h COng nghip thcng bho kda qua' nhu' sau. D-i/Da di"erm c6ng b6 tj6drpvai EIA:-.T4fi' tr,lub ND cd-c huy'en-, xa co da va n a tru sn Saoqundrahiep (tai vi trm c no chuna d8 thaa' duopc). 2/ Th&i aian thilrc hi6 n c'ong bo': TUh25/8/ / ji kien naltbi dan doi v6i nmuc tieu ctia dit dn, cdc chinh such v~ a'nh hir6ng cciadif tt: -Do'i vdi muc tie'u cu'a dlt a'n:nihtn chung ca'c h6o d'an dlric hl8na Ilot ci'ia dir dn v'a cac ca'p chinh quyen deu cdanh aid cao muc ti4u cuda dii' gin,g6p phdin taoldie`u kien phat trien san xuat va c?ai thie.n nang cao ddi sonc vat cha"t, tinh than cua nhan dan. - Cac chinh sach du, an: Ve cdi ban cac chinh sach cu'a du,' an deu du'c trien khai thu'c hien tot. Cac th6ng tin ve dir an v'a cac chinh sach ve den bu giai ph6ng mat bang, tai dinh cu' deu dtfcfc cong bo ro.ng rai trong nhan dan. Vie,c thi!c hien cac chinh sach den bi dtd,c lap abng ke khai va tinh gia tri thiet hai dung theo mau cu'a duf in quy dinh, da s"fiha5dan`nva camc ho bi anh htreng dong tinh'ung hp, Qu?d,rOh tnie,n khai ti h id'hi ddn v cuac Tong Cong ty dien llfc Viet Nam va, dia phu'cng d c.6o,sui ph6i hdp tot de ho?an tfihnnh' cong trinh'du ng 'tien' - Anh htfang cu'a ds in: Ve cd ban dtu an it'gay ah hsig xau den d(i song cong d6ng dan cil, moi trtlf?ng va.cac cong trinh c sd ha' an khamc. Viec khmo sat 'da chon phu'dng in tuyen it'phi den obu giai toa nha cdia cua nhan dan' (khbng co trrnc, hdp phai ;chuyen' cho p 6rid),-i6rn'g-'day kh8ng di qua cac cong trinh van hoa', di tich'lich set hoac c6c'khu vic do Nha nirfc quy dinih ndi dud~ng day dien khong dirdc di qua.

82 t. Avem Xy Dy1_1T.4kd,1iS /A A'1. 6 4' < ' \ - a -2-) ' UBND tlnh DE)k Lak CONG HOA XA H()I CHU NGHIA VIRT NAM S( CONG NGHIIEP Doc 1ip - Tu do - Hanh phiic So: 6 / /- /TB-SCN V/v c6ng bo tai lieu RAP va EIA Bu6n Ma Thu0t, ngtiy.g thdng 9 ndm 2003 Dif an NLNT ddt 2. Kitih g:1n: Uy bae nlidn dddn cac Iiuyez: Ddk Nonig, Ddk Rld, Kronig NO, Ea Kar, M'Drdk, Kronlg Buk, Ea Hleo, Ci'Jutt. Theo yeu cau cua Cong ty dien liuc 3 tai c8ng van so 6 : 3739/EVN/DL3- DANT ngay 19/8/2003 V/v c6ng bo tai lieu RAP va EIA Du an NLNT ddt 2; S6 COng nghiep de nghi UBND cac huyen co cong trinh trong Duf ain nang ILiIng nong thon khu vu.c mien Trung (NLNTMT) dot 2 thufc hie,n viec c6ng bb tai lieu thong tin chung ve dtf an nhu' sau. 1/ Cong bo cac thong tin chung ve DLf an NLNTMT dclt 2, chinhi sach, quyen ldi cuia cac ho bi anh huk3ng b6i dt/ an (trich tu ke' ho,ach hanh dong tai dinh cu' RAP, cac ainh hutng v'a bien phap han che ainh hufng cu'a du' an den mai truldng (trich ti bao cao danh gia tac dong moi trutzng EIA); co tafi lieu gtri kem theo cong van nay. 2/ Dia diem cong bo: T,ai tru s6 UBND huyen c6 df u in (vi tri cong chung de thay). 3/ Do'i vdi vie.c cong bo thong tin t,ai cac xa co du. an, de nghi UBND huye.n xem xet de sao gii xa nhu'ng noi dung cu'a tai lieu phu hdp vdi tinh hinh thu,c te tfng xa va to chufc hut'ng dan cho UBND cac xa trong huye.n thu.c hien viec cong bo'thong tin chung ve df a/n tai tru sd UBND xa. Vdi noi dung tren de nghi UBND huyen khan trdcsng to chuic thufc hien via bao cao ve ket qua', daunh gia su, quan taim cu'a ngudii dan de'n dif an gufi cho Sa Cong nghiep vao cu6i thang 9/2003 de tong hop bao cao Cong ty dien Iltc 3. Ndi nhfin: KT. GIAM DOC S(I CONG (NHIEP DAK LAK - Nht tren; PHO GIAM LC - UBND Tinh (B/C); - Cty dien lc 3; - Lfu VT, NL- K a Vo Thanh

83 Lf ai7, 4 1 L 4 IVL V Tk~d UBND TINII QUANG NGAI CON(; IIG0 XAII I01CII ungiiia VI U 1NAM SOCONG NGI -II P DuOc L.5p - TuF do - Il ilan plific So: 1/f /SCN Quiw1ig Ngii, tg,"j' 22 h(i/iig 9 ii(,in 2003 V/v lh6ng bio kel ua c6nig bo6 tl.i licu R A 1 vii 1ilA DIr I I NLN'I doyt 2 tllil QLlilg n Ng5il Kinhll gtir C6iig ty dilen luc 3 Th co yet] cl3l cfia CUig ty (iun ltic 3, nlg,y 01/9/2003 SC C3iig ngliilp (1d gli dcii U13ND cic xvi c6 tllmau gigidi oal 2 D iy 1ni;ig l hunqlg nh3ing thic kim vuc M ic l I lli g 1-r1n chia lbain ti hi Q LKiIIg Ngaii c,ic la i Hicu saui Th6i1g tin cli ting ve DLI lul Ilinllg ItLIllng 11n1ng tlh6l, l6ili ktc chlillil smlcli dn bi tron-og cdti uim vai dd glhi U13ND ctic xa th6nig bwio, gkii tlhiclh clio inh5n da bliet ve cl(r ti1 Vi Ctic clme do chliuiib sicj ve deii bu c6 1 i&n quan, ingoai cxic th6ng liii tr6in S( Colig iigilicl) dcl y6ti CURU UBNI) cic xa 11ici1 ( v(i 13ain (6ii Li chic hliuy6ii dcl blit tlill ve caic clik dlo ciniii sich rilng c6ia d(u (in do U13ND tinihi QLIIil,g Ng5i i ban lilmhl Ngoali r-a tronig (qitii(i-ib ll hi himhl kici km (1f1l hfill cmo Blani (1cii Li cii hi yc il Va Xa se giai tihichi liei dei uigli-i b t lil t ha i h1iciu cic chci (1o chiiiih soich vc d6n 1L'i va cac lhonig tlii cuda DLI all Co licii (jlii; SC Cong jnghiip Qtii'ing NgSii xiii bo CiO 1ilCO yeu cau Clia C Ily C6ilg ty t 1(/1 GIAN'I I)OC S6 CONG NGIIIILI' Noi nzh/ian: P lgli 1G D)OC - Nli,i trril -Luti V'F/ 4/ (i; T -64 I cl'l l icli I)ieln

84 ci. L o.i U13NDT inh QUANG NAM CONG (IA XA X ltti c(nit N('I'iA v11'3l' NAN4 'S6 C(1ON< NGIIIR P D)oc Iap - 'ru do - HI-ili ph)uc.s(: tpl- /CN-K''&GCrSDN Tarnm K5, ngdy J thdiig 10 nclr 2003 V/v Cong bd RAP' va 1U[A cong trhnh diqn ecic xa Cliaval vl lala)ez huyqnt Nani GiAng. Kinli gui,; Coig Ty Dili lifrc 3 S(s Cotng Nghiep Quiitng Namn dai nlian dlr(*1c cong vain c:a Cong Ly dd nghti l6 chirc cong b6 chfnh sich ddn bb,tdi dlinh cu (RAP) vil dainhi gi. tac dlong mnoi Lruding (EIA) cac conlg (ritli dien thu0c DL,r 1n NLNT,&I Cong iigi iep da t6 clctc cong b6i tai vain phbng UBND ILuyEti Natn Chang V vao gily Thnhli phln dia pilarcng thatn ldu cong b.6: -LIanh (lao UBND huy#i. -Ban D13THvi GPMB huyexi. -UBIND cac: xa Cha Val va LaDZe. I-IiCti tai Ban1 fdbtu-lvzt GPM8 huycn danig tridii khai I[p PhUh(Ing ain DBTIIv2i GPtMB3 trillh plhe duyyt dl UBND'I':)11 c5p kiikiih phi ttiiuc hiiti giaic quydt 16ii bui tioa d tng cho c.ic ho bi ba'nli l1ung va LIiet kilai'. Vay s& Cong nggliip lap ong vwn ndy bau dd (qul CUng ty dujic Nit. MiH. tht?n: Kl(T GIAM D6C - NIutrall I - r uu VT, KT1 &GSDN O-1( (1IAM *)0(f 'l'ran Pill HUNG d Wusq:t'0 00Z 90-0O 8T0 'ON 3NOHd NC NO d3ih0n 9NOD OS WOdd

85 -4 ua- tck ) 9.9, 5 :.RNTHU DLQUANGNGNJ FAX NO. :055e23500 Sep :43PM P1 CObJNG TY E)ItI LCU 3 *01N, luyc Q(SANGs NlsAI ('(ONG H()A XA HOI ('1HU N(HIA VIiCT NAM Doc JAp-I'tr do-hanh ph6c sh6: z7z D 13/DQN-DNT Q1jc;/: NgJij, i,gy 19 t/midr 9 /oni 2003 "1''/ ('(eiig ll Iheu RAP vii EIA )ir', IVI Ni. Iioe, flfh;7 dot 2" Kinih _gm -CONG TY Dl-N LfiJ2 3 -BAN OLDANLNT K-liJ VUC M[1'N TR(JNG Thtrc hiiie( clii dao cua Cong ty Di6n l.rc 3 iai Viil han s6 3740LVN/DL.3-DANNI ngiay 19/8/2003 1//v b6 h{i lc3ng /il' RAP vd) EIA Dul c7n NL, rnoig I/hta7 do 2". Di)lc tlrc Quang Ngai da lcip cic lh6rig tiil chulng v6 DLr Sin nang )hng neng dyr 2 Nra d5i c6iig bo.cic tlihong tin v6 DLr ari, RAP, I.1A tai tru sb Diern Iue uini va tai cac Clii ul.inli dien: Drc l'h6, Biih ScSin, tai cac train rlier: Sdn Ha. Trv t, 6 ng, lha T'j l. rilhcig clia phitr(rg c6 di! ain. Th6i gian thiuc hien c6ng ho: tir rngay 04/9/2003. Y kie6.n cua nglrui dan d6i vci mu'ic ticu dur.in, cc chirnh s.ich va anh hv6tqg. c du'r ar: VgLtri dan quari (an, hoan ngikanh vih ;ing h6 dtur an. 0i6:n ltuc Qua.ng Ng5iu kfnil beio caio. Tr'li, trong,! Noi iz idw: -NVI lat (,Am f)6(,.:lkj'ic QUA NG NGAI vj t A QL

86 ffrom DIEN LUG QURNOIG NRM PHONE NO.: 85295G c4_' SEP :21PM F CCONG TY D,lPN L5JC 3 COlNG U.A HQI CHU NGHIA VICT NAM ff1*.n LVC QUANG NAM * 14p - Ty.i do - Haiih phuc S6:.2#IFDL3/DQNa-9 7arn Ky, qgjyzolhdng 9 ndm V/v thac vieun cdng br Ia fidu RAP vi EIA clia Dat on Ndng Iultmg n6tig th6on-da1 2. Kinh g5: - COng ty Dign lqc 3 Thdc hi?n c6ng v3n s6 3740/EVN/DL3-DANT ngay 19/8/2003 cua C6ng ty Dier Iltc 3 v/v c6ng W lai lieu RAP va EMA Dii da NLNT dpil 2, Dien lic Quang Nam bao cic C6ng ty DiLan hdc 3 nhhtl sau: Tinh Quang Nam c6 4 xi dtfdc dau th cdp dien thu6c Du a'n n.ng luiang ndng th6n khu viic mi~n Trung - dat 2. Do 1i cac xa: A VLfang, Bha Le cua huygn D6ng Giang va Cha Val, La De cua huy?n Nam Giang. Cac di phllang nay thudc khu vtrc quan 1I cua Chi nhinh di6n Dai L8c. Vao ngay 2818/2003, Dion hic Quang Nam di thudc hisn c6ng M cac tiai Wiu: Ki hoach hinh dong tai dinh ct (RAP) va Bao cao dinh gia tac d6ng moi trlong (EIA) cila Dvf in nang liqng nong thbn khu vilc mi4n Trung dot 2 tai: tru s6 cu'a Chi nhanh dien Dai L6c va tru sd cua DilEn hic Quang Nam. Hinh thllc c8ng b6: nirm y6t tai ndi giao tiep khach hing. y kiin danh gia va quan tam ci6a ngudi den, hign nay Dign luc chuia nhrn dtfac 9 thong tin. Neu co nhilng th8ng tin cua uigui3i d&n phan anh thi Di4n Itic se bio cao ngay va C8ng ty. Dien ldc Quang Nam kinh bao cao CBng ty. Ndl nhmnkl, L GIAM O6c -NhaitrEn. N lt,,s r ; -Ban QL DANLNTKV mijn Trung. -Lieu TC-HC. KCD Jt; r

87 CONG TY DIEN LUC 3 CONG H-I( \ X H,111 CIIU NGIWA VIET NAM DIlN LUC KON TU DOc O l) - Tlr (do- I lai pliic SO6 $/.i'/dl3/dkt-4 Koll Tmn ' ngoylf/hing 9Yn ntt 2003 I!v bano CC1( lciec c(o g I&)i &(;u RAP vc EIA (d(ad,i NLNI' to'! 2. Kiuibl gui: COnig ty Diei Luc 3. lliquc hi2ii cong Vin so EVN/DOI3-D)AN 1'ng{iy CUia COn;g ty Oi jn LirC 3 ve vifc hao Cao vi;ec cong bo i.ii I;U Iu RAP V6 LIA (dlr.in ii,ii.g Wtoing loilg thon khiu vtrc ntien 1TruIng d$q 2, 1 li ji LLtrc Koli Tum xil b.io co C ihit sa.i: 1. Di COng boc c.ic tzi lieu n6i Wrn2i tai luln mrl'ing K inli Doanih, Clii nliini, lr. Di&Ci LLuc hliyeni vi libnd c;ic x. CO (IU dir Ail vtil Sali: I. X F) dakna- I ;,k1to; 2. X.' I"" X.,iig - Dik To: 3. Xa M.,,1g RI - DAk TO; 4. X5 VWin XuO; - D.,k TO; 5. Xa NgQc YCu - D.,k TO; 6. Xa Ngoc L.ay - Dak TO; 7. Xa P(i E - KoI1 Plong; 8. Xa PO KO - Dak1,^; 9. X5 I-li;u - Kon Plioig; I 0. Xa5 Dak RuOng- KoC, R1y; It. X5 D-5k Mar- DV;, H.'; 12. Xa Clu f-lreiig - rx KoC, Tuii,; 2. TI1(ii gian thilrc lien coing bo: Clio d6in nay, clila co y kicn pluian lic()i cfa ngu'(li dain (1('i v('ii c.ic t.ii licdi (d51 cong bw; 1eUii c6, doi; vi si tic"p tuc to'ig hlci b.io c.io COIng ty. Ncri niiuln: 1'11O GlAM DOC - Vhzt irenl. IPu l D VillU I. J LU(C KON TIUM - Lrni KT Kl-l, \r. -S1YNSNUYEN

88 Fr~jri~ TFAX< ['I Et~ LIJC 0. TF I PFHorE ino.: !e Sep :25FU1 FO1 *1~~~~~~~o C CN TY D) Llh: 3 (J)NCI I 16A?XA 1i C e1111 NUTIA VIFT NAM 1)l1,N Lyl ('l,iljan 1 1TR 1 )c IQP - l g do 1 In!nh ph,;,c.s.6: 11?f1) L3!4)0'1'- 12f J'f&, 19 ihciig 9 7te1irl 2003 D)vf di NI.ATI dn) 2) Kiili i gti: Cong ty M)ibn tiw 3 1lilec hinl CV s EVN/Dl.3-D)AN I ng6y 19/R12003 cai;i (COng ly I)iW1 Wc. 3 ve viic C;Ong b6 tai ieu RAP vn li,a d1 ti nang Ifi(nag iino1g l.hm khui vuc mi6n TrUlh, diol 2, Dien lcv dti dmi,g i,;:c th0mg tin chkng v qtl ain, cihinh skli quy41i tiin e(;,ic hl Lhi LU7h lthiing bli dli ~n, c;ic alih 11tng vai bin p116ip 11an ch1 huhlll hu6nug Ciu t.il ;in (trichl IL( X< hlioch Ninh d6lng ti6i d'nii cl & li3io cuiu dcaiii gi iac d61n g mei TruOTdIg) -)ia dieni cong b6: J ati tru s(s Djin Luu v;i ii ctic ciii nhlnh. tiam (ildii ndti co (IV ';11. Thcii gian thuc hitn cong b6: NgAy 29/X/2003 * kiin c;'a ngudi don d6i vdi dtf an: DA61g 6in,l V'6 nitlc ti&l c6111g nhitf ciic cliil.l sa) cilli dtl n,i DiEn lic fqming lri kinli b;io 6o C6ng ty hitl K'1/G1AM L)OC I)I N LU(.Q QI JAN(G 'IRI I'HO iam D()C, AII',i fxlu f : *i.*,..'. - Nr1Jiii nat,,.mu DN T C NG TY NU)r!v3C 3 D4 NAy*4/

89 FROMt: DIEU DO QLGL-B40 PHONE NO.: Sep :05PM P1 (ONG-1( YV!iI".N ii 3 (.,N(Z, HA X,4 11(1 (11ll NG11ii% V'iPA NANI I)II,N 1A,A ', JIA LAI Ooc Lii -bj i)o - lis.ni Piiikc S4:.81,:. ixl^,ii(;.- 4 PleiAii, ng6y 25 thing 0( n.im 2003 V/V 7 7/-,'7 (r 1t)f l?f' RA,4P Vi, F.IA dt,7 cini.vl fli- to/ 2 Kinbt gzl. UTJND CAC HUY'N VA TH NIl 1110 PFTLKJ I t i11.1c h iel cong van ss 3740 EVN/DL3-DANT ngay I 9/08/2003 cdi COng ty Di,en luc 3 ve vidc con g b6 tii RiEu RAP vai EIA dil in NLNI 'dt 2 ". 1i.in Wic Gia Lai tllhng bio den UBND cic huyen va thanli phl6, LJ3 ND) 26.xa co. dtf# a iii,6 I tiong nong t1hun dqyt 2 ( W3 I- (lot 2) biet, ti histu c6ic chlitilh micih quyc,ii Idi tua caic bt hbi anh hu6ng b6i dif in (trich tw k6 hoacii h11al(i9 d6ng Lai dinii ctf RAP); mrtn 5U d ;'Mhn hilng vra bivn phap han che nilh huiing cu'a DLi an del n 6i truoii]g (trichitaf bdo ciu tjdi,th gia tic dorig moi tni&&g EfA) Dii Jietm thong bao: tai van ph6ng cac Chi ihldin1 dian, Trtim dien cic huyen, RiCtng lkh vijc liuy'ii Chu- Pr6ng va Thanh pho Ileikui tai D11 luc lia l,ai. IThk giui : tu ng'ay 29/09/2003 d6n khi k&l thiic du air. r'!'fu ltct tvng ho,cp quti 1un3 edi dn WBI - c4ij 2 keni /lmeo) * Ti:e J)"in ti! i GIA.M OIOC I Ll,lC'~~ 1 l.. I~DI~ ~ ~ ~ 1W. bioo C.t~' I ~I~~p ( c3e GJt TY DIDNLlC.'U.A mang-e)o.a.n V i I... b''i' I.j';, l CONGTYDI1f,11ll.,:1L'iVC 3 I 1A'.1)liv,l,(;i;lI.../...7Is;jvE.i,), Ay... SOtNGA.Y47cJX

90 JiEU DO DLG3L-1340 PHO{NE NO. : Sep :05PM P2 1.N.11(1') Q1lY MO CA~C CON(. TRIiNI! TRIJOC I)IrIN WM.- d14t 2 SUt T4Eiadingiriinh 1hmy?n Quy_m 'A_cag trtnhi 1'4"ig V45 DtfkincicIp difn tin DZTiA SA ItrIs,g 1'DX D)7 1IA etfii (gq ' 0 $if. Whn s4 ho ( Kin) I BA ( KVA ) (_Tr.LdOiw ng 2 1 ~ ~ 4 ~ 5 ~~ ' If ~~~~~~268, ,5 326, ' I KOng L.ong K ivi's K'rni,g 10, , ) Ld Ku K'Iaeng ,5 16,818 i * 3 1C'c Tungip K'Bang 12, , K6ngd. c ; K'Bong 14,200 9 (80 12, S.6ing chro 9, ,640' K6nig Yanig KO.cr 018 3S1 _25021, ~ ( P,21T6 Aylinpa 8, ,5 1,6782 ' fr la Rbol Aytirpa 1, ,5.3,621.1_ (a M Rdn A~ymtpa (0, I (0 In Rsai Kr~ng P. 13, (4, ) 440 I1 Chtf Udrng Kr6ngpa 3, , CbiIGu Kr6ng~~~pa 0, ,000 1.R (.3 la P4t.-- Dk Doo 12, ,478 4, Dfik So Mci' I k Doui 12, , Xii Th-ing - l)k 00a 28, I6 Kon Ya,.ng 1D;Ik Doa (4, , lar Mpg Wi.k Von 14, , I8 hi~ I)reng C_(hu S4 (.,Rs( ,750 2, (I. C)ILI ~ 8, II 1,3(( I Q Jr l I' ('ting C(c Si! 2, X, I anilni ('lut SO 3, , ( Ia TOr (l~1,'rowig (4, ,1'25 3.(1I "alicrn (Chi Pr6ng 14, , in Khmirl (ui'ni 6.68 If t 10,4&1 1.0I) 450) 25, X-IhM.Yig ( ,8401 S, 51,(' ) 26 In K~~nh II' ('lt'i~~~i, 1,cw( '4 (45 I,181)4 i

91 Category B EIA Rural Energy I - Phase 11 EVN and PC 3 Annex 4: Relevant Data A4.1 Scope of Project Scope No. Communes District MV line MV&LV lines LV line Sub- Capacity I Meters I (k_i (kmn) (km) stations (kva) e 1) QIANG BINH province ,221 Thanh Hola Tuyen Hoa ,536 2 Nga Hoia Tuyen Hoa Traeing San Quang ninh Lim Thuiy Le Thuy ) Q ANG TRI province ,295 1 A Bung Dakrong A Ngo Dakrong A Vao Dakrong H2ming San Huong Hoa H2m&ng Laup Huong Hoa Group of TT Lao Baio-Tan Long-Tan Thainh Huong Hoa Group of Tin Laup-Tan Lian Huong Hoa ) QUANG NAM province ,150 1 A VaAng Hien Bhlee Hien La Dee Nam Giang Cha Val Nam Giang ) QUANG NGAI province ,327 1 Ba Trang Ba To Ba Kham Ba To Group of San LaGp-SAn Dung Son Tay Group of San Tan-San Tinh Son Tay Group of B.Tha0nh-B.HElOp-B.Trung-B Ch2ang-B Tgn-B.Hail Binh Son ,210 6 Di Lang Sub-town Son Ha San Thainh Son Ha San Thu' Son Ha San Bao Son Ha Sn Th Aung Son Ha San Trung Son Ha San Hail Son Ha Trai Lainh Tra Bong Page 53 September 2003

92 Rural Energy I - Phase 11 Scope No. Communes District MV line MV&LV lines LV line Sub-t s Capacity Meters _ (kmn(kmn) stations kva) Mtr 14 Trai Nham Tra Bong Trai Kha Tra Bong Trai Buii Tra Bong Trai Quan Tra Bong Trai Thou Tra Bong ) GI LAI province ,798 1 la Kh2al Cha Pah Pai Tol AYunPa la Rbol AYunPa A Ma Ran AYunPa la Ta Cha Prong Baou Caiin _ Cha Prong ,134 7 la Dreng Chu Se la Phang Chu Se la Hrui Chu Se la Le Chu Se Kon Lan Khang K'Bang La Ku KBang Kbla K'Bang Ta Tung K'Bang Sa Roh Kon Ch'ro Kon Yang Kon Ch'ro Chm Gu Krong Pa Cha Drang Krong Pa la Rsai Krong Pa la Kinh la Grai Aak Sa Mei Dak Doa la Bing Dak Doa Kon Gang DAk Doa Hra Mangyang , Trang Dak Doa , la Pach Dak Doa ) KON TUM province ,660 1 AakNa Dak To Mang XAng Dak To Ngouc Yau Dak To Ngouc Lay Dak To Pa Ca Dak To AAk Mar Dak Ha Page 54 September 2003

93 Rural Energy I - Phase 11 Scope No. Communes District MV line MV&LV lines LV line Sub- Capacity Meters (km) (km) (km) stations (kva) e 7 Cha Hreng Kon Tum Town AAk Ruaong Kon Plong Psi A Kon Plong ) DA KLAK province ,866 1 Aak Som Dak Nong Aak Rm6ng DakNong Kien Thanh Dak RIap Ea Nam Ea Hleo Dlin Yang Ea Hleo Ea Khal Ea Hleo Ea Ral Ea Hleo Ea Blang Krong Buk Ea Arang K'rong Buk Nam Kar Krong No Buan Chofah Krong No Cm Prao Ma Drak EAo. Ea Kar , Ea Pal Ea Kar , Ca Hua Ea Kar Ca Ni Ea Kar , Ea Knaup Sub-town Ea Kar Aak Orang Cm Jut ,195 TOTAL , ,317 Page 55 September 2003

94 Category B EIA Rural Energy I - Phase 11 EVN and PC 3 Annex 5: Associated Project Reports and Project Implementation Schedule A5.1 List of Associated Reports The following Project reports were used to draft this EIA. For further information on these reports, please contact Power Company Number 3. * Project Feasibility Study * Project ResettlementAc(ion Plan A5.2 Project Implementation Schedule Year of 2002 Yearof 2003 Year of 2004 Sr'll Klioixi iliuc 1Istquarer 2nd uartcr 13rd quarter 4 th quater I1st uarter 12nd quarter 13rd quaner 14 tlquater Ist quarier 2nd quarter 1 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 1OI 1I1 12:,7 2i 3: 4: 5 6S 7& 8 9: 1I0 I11 12: I 2i 3, 4: 5 6 I Preparatio ni : 2 Idenltify Project scope i 3 Feld survey for FS, RAP, EIA mnaking _ Draft of FS, RAP, EIA 5 Assess and revised FS, RAP, EIA 6 Cinplete FS, RAP, EIA 7 Approval FS, RAP, EIA 8 Detail survey and design hivitation for material and equipment bidding 10 Evaluationi of material and equipment bidding... *_ I Approval by EVN 12 Approval by WB 13 Signing material and equipment contracts Preparationi civil cotlstnctioni bidding i.., 1 Inivitationi anid evaluationi civill cotistructionl bidding.... _ 16 Civil Coiistructiori Page 56 September 2003

95 Rural Energy I - Phase II Annex 6: Resettlement Action Plan The Resettlement Action Plan (RAP) is presented in Volume II of the FS. This annex provides some of the key information from the RAP. A6.1 Entitlement Matrix Type TYPE OF AFFECTION Quantity Legality Compensation policies Implementing measures of PAH' Being affected 1,330 All PAH having certificate of land Compensated in cash at market The provincial or district 1 temporarily on occupancy or, in absence of it, PAH prices or substitution rates compensation Committees will agriculture, forestry land recognized as stable occupants by respectively for harvests lost and adjust the compensation unit cost within the ROW the communal authority or simply trees lost. before compensating for PAH(if PAH included in the PAH inventory necessary) It will be compensated at least 4 months earlier before construction. 2 Being affected 1,735 All PAH having certificate of land Compensated in cash at market The provincial or district temporarily on occupancy or, in absence of it, PAH prices or substitution rates compensation Committees will residential and planting recognized as stable occupants by at respectively for harvests lost and adjust the compensation unit cost land without least two neighbors, or simply PAH trees lost before compensating for PAH(if construction works but included in the PAH inventory. necessary) within the ROW It will be compensated at least 4 months earlier before construction. Being affected a part of 27 All PAH having certificate of land The PAHs will be The provincial or district house and land within occupancy or, in absence of it, PAH a) Compensated in cash at compensation Committees will the ROW, with recognized as stable occupants by at substitution rate calculated on adjust the compensation unit cost available land beside, least two neighbors, or simply PAH house's type and quality, before compensating for PAH(if affected part with area included in the PAH inventory b necessary) <25% total overall b) Compensated In cash for house housing land Houses compensated and housing at least land 4 months will be earlier before construction. In case, the demolished parts can damage to the remaining structure, the structure will be also compensated The PAHS receiving compensated cost and reconstructing their houses by themselves Page 57 September 2003

96 Rural Energy I - Phase 11 4 Being affected a part of 136 All PAH having certificate of land The PAHS will be: The provincial or district house and land within occupancy or, in absence of it, PAH a) Compensated in cash at compensation Committees will the ROW, with available recognized as stable occupants by at substitution rate calculated on adjust the compensation unit cost land beside for least two neighbors, or simply PAH house's type and quality before compensating for PAH(if reorganizing, affected included in the PAH inventory. necessary) part with area >25% b) Compensated in cash for total house area or even housing land Compesand at last 4 be less, but partial c) Relocation allowance earlier before construction. The demolition can cause PANS receiving compensated cost damage to all structure and reconstructing their houses by of the house or themselves. inconvenient of using. Having a partly or All PAH having certificate of land a) Compensated in cash for The provincial or district wholly affected house occupancy or, in absence of it, PAH overall land and assets on the compensation Committees will but remaining land is recognized as stable occupants by at land, buying other land by adjust the compensation unit cost not sufficient for least two neighbors, or simply PAH themselves and reconstructing before compensating for PAH(if reorganizing. included in the PAH inventory. other houses. necessary). b) Compensated with other land Houses and housing land will be and in cash for assets on the land, compensated at least 4 months and reconstructing other houses earlier before construction. The on the compensated land by PAHS receiving compensated cost themselves and reconstructing their houses by c. Relocation, transport themselves. allowances, timely movement incentive 6 Land occupied 440 All PAH having certificate of land Compensated in cash for land and The provincial or district permanently for pole occupancy or, in absence of it, PAH assets affected. compensation Committees will foundations recognized as stable occupants by adjust the compensation unit cost the communal authority. before compensating for PAH(if necessary). Houses and housing land will be compensated at least 4 months earlier before construction Page 58 September 2003

97 Rural Energy I - Phase 11 A6.2 Total Impacted Households Residential Land (m 2 ) House and Structure Number No Household Address of Nationality Job Temporary Permaien Total Affected Compensatio People Total Affect t Affect Type Area Area n op Area (m a I uing Binh X3 Thanh H6a-Huy2n Thanh H6a No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 2 X3 Ng Hba-Huydn Thanh H6a No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 3 X3 Trdng Srn-Huyon QuAng Ninh No PAHs impacted on houses and structures _ 4 X3 Lam Thity-Huyon Ld ThOy No PAHs impacted on houses and structures UOuing Tri Xi A Bung-Huyon Cak R6ng No PAHs impacted on houses and structuies 2 Xi A Vao-Huyen D3k R6ng No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 3 X3 A Vao-Huy&n Dak R6ng No PAHs impacted on houses and structures = = 4 X3 Hcng San-Huy2n H6'ng Hoa No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 5 Xa H6ng Lap-Huyen H11ng H6a No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 6 Cum x3 TT Lao Bao-Tan Long-TAn Thanh- No PAHs impacted on houses and structures Huyen Hdng H6a 7 Cum x3 Tan L3p-Tan Lidn-Huyen Hong No PAHs impacted on houses and structures H6a 1/u/dng Nam , , X3 A Vang-Huyen Hidn , Xi BhLee -Huydn Hien , , Xi La Dee-Huy&n Nam Giang , , X3 Cha Val-Huyen Nam Giang , , Page 59 September 2003

98 Rural Energy I - Phase 11 Residential Land (M 2 ) House and Structure Number No Household Address of Nationality Job Temporary Permanen Total Affected Compensatio People Total ~~~~~~~~~~~Affect t Type Area Area omprenat(l) (ml 2 ) (ml') naram) IV Quang Ngii , , Xa Ba Trang-HuyCn Ba Ta No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 2 Xi Ba Khim-Huyen Ba Ta No PAHs Impacted on houses and structures Cum xa Binh Thanh, Binh Hidp, Binh 3 Binh Chang, Binh Tin, Binh Prung, Ha No PAHs impacted on houses and sfructures Trung Bin Chang Binh Tan, Binh HunSan 4 Gum x5 Sn Tin, Sc Tinh-HuyTn So No PAHs impacted on houses and structures Iiy Gum x3 San Lip-San dung-huydn San9 5 Cumxay Tiy Son'Up-Scin dung-hu& Son Xa Son Trung-Huy&n Smn Ha Xa Son HA-Huydn Son Ha Xi Son ThAnh-Huy&n Son Ha No PAHs impacted on houses and structures _ 9 Xa Son Thiy-Huyin Son Ha Xa Son Bao-Huyon Son Ha No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 11 Xa Son Thong-Huy4n Smn Ha , , 'FT Di Ling No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 13 Xi Tra Lanh-Huyin Tra B6ng Xa Tra Nham-Huydn TrI Bong No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 15 Xa Tra KhM-Huydn TrI B6ng No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 16 Xa Tra 8Ca-Huydn Tra B6ng , , Xi Tra QuAn-Huy4n Tra Bong No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 18 Xa Tra Tho-Huyen Tra B6ng No PAHs impacted on houses and struclures VGia Lai , , , , Page 60 September 2003

99 Rural Energy I - Phase 11 Residential Land (m') House and Structure Number No Household Address of Nationality Job TeTotal Affected People Total TeAffect t Affect Type Area Area n Area (s) (inl) (inl) nae i Xi la Khai-Huyen Ch Pah Xa PC T6-Huydn Ayun Pa No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 3 Xa la Rbol-Huyen Auyn Pa No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 4 X3 A Ma Ron-Huy&n AyunPa No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 5 Xa la T6-Huyen Ch Pr6ng X3 Bau Can-Huy&n Ch Pr6ng 7 Xa la Dreng-Huyen Ch Se No PAHs impacted on houses and structures _ 8 X3 la Phang-Huyon Ch Se No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 9 Xi la Hru1-Huyen Ch Se Xa la Li-Huyin Ch Se Xi Kon Lon Khong-Huyen K'Bang X3 La Ku-Huydn KBang X3 Kon Bla-Huyen K'Bang No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 14 Xi To Tung-Huyen K'Bang No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 15 Xi Sa Roh-Huyen Kong Ch'ro X3 Kon Yang-Huyen Kong Ch'ro 17 Xi Ch Gu-huyin Kr6ng Pa Xi Ch Dr3ng-Huyen Krong Pa No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 19 X3 la RSai-Huyin Kr6ng Pa _ 20 Xi la Kenh-Huyen la Grai 21 Xi D3k sa Mei-Huyin D31k Doa , , X3ta B3ng-huyen D3k Doa , , Page 61 September 2003

100 Rural Energy I - Phase 11 Residential Land (M 2 ) House and Structure Number No Household Address of Nationality Job Temporary Permanen T otal Affected Compensatio People Total TemporrArPeranena Affect t Affect Type Arean Area o mpesal Xa Kon Gang-Huyen Dak Doa , , Xa Hra-Huyen Mang Yang , , Xa Trang-huyen Dak Doa Xi la P&ch-Huy&n Dak Doa, VI Koln Trjm , , Xa Dik Na-Huyen Dik T X3 Ming Xang-Huyen Dak T6 No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 3 Xa Ngoc Ydu-HuyXn Dak T , , Xi Ngoc Lay-Huydn Dak T Xi P6 C6-Huyen Dak T6 No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 6 Xi D3k Mar-Huyqn Bak Ha No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 7 X3 Ch Hreng-Thi xa Kon Tum No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 8 Xa Bik Ru6ng-Huyen Kon Plong No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 9 Xa PC E-Huyen Kon Piong No PAHs impacted on houses and structures VII Di*kLi* , , , Xa Dak Som-Huy&n D3k N6ng No PAHs impacted on houses and strucures 2 Xa Dak Rmang-Huyon Dak N6ng No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 3 Xi Kien Thanh-Huyen Dik Rlap Xa Ea Nam-Huyen Ea H'Ieo No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 5 X3 Dlie Yang-Huyrn Ea Hieo No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 6 Xa Ea Khal-Huyen Ea H'teo No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 7 Xa Ea Ral-Huyen Ea H'teo No PAHs impacted on houses and structures Page 62 September 2003

101 Rural Energy I - Phase 11 Residential Land (m 2 ) House and Structure Number No Household Address of Nationality Job Temporary Permanen Total Affected Compensatio People Total Affect taffect Type Area Area n Area (t) (in 2 ) (inl) nae i Xa Ea Blang-Huyen Krong Buk Xa Ea Dr6ng-Huyen Kr6ng Buk Xa Nam Kar-Huyen Krong N Xa Bu6n Choah-Huyen Kr6ng N X3 C Prao-Huyen Ma Drak Xa Ea O-HuyAn Ea Kar Xa Ea Pal-Huyen Ea Kar Xi C Hue-Huyen Ea Kar No PAHs impacted on houses and structures 16 Xa C Ni-Huy&n Ea Kar TT EaKn6p-Huyen EA Kar Xa Dak DRong-Huyen C JuM ) TOTAL , , , , , , A6.3 Total Statistics on Land Acquisition of Project Affected Land (m 2 ) Permanent Land (m 2 ) N Commune District Agricultural Land Forestry Land _ 0 Manma Residenti Agricultu Forest Resident Tot Cinnam Rub r Coffe Fruit Vegeta Rice Other Subtota Forest de Wastela Subtota al Land ral Land Land ial Land al on ber r e Trees ble Forest d nd I Quling Bxnh 4,57 37,397 25,191 6,330 6, ,300 14,376 60, , , , Thanh Hoa uyn Hoia 26,700 12,970 4,330 44,000 34,400 12,970 47,370 68, Page 63 September 2003

102 Rural Energy I - Phase II Affected Land (m 2 ) Permanent Land (M 2 ) N Commune Ditrt Agricultural Land Forestry Land C Residenti Agricultu Forest Resident Tot I ~ Cinnam Rub Peppe Coffe Fruit Vegeta Subtota Manma Wastela Subtota al Land ral Land ry iat Land al on r ber e Trees ble ~ Rice Other I Forest de ndiland ~ ~ ~ ~~o br r e Tes beforest n Nga Hoaa Tuyan Hoia 4, ,700 1, ,880 38,058 14,376 52, Tra3aing San Q6nahing 8,930 10, , ,270 26, ,848 62, , ,9 4 Lam Thuiy La0 Thuiy 1, ,760 70,572 21,428 92,000 28, Quling TrP ,688 42,343 19,68 2,450 81, ,131 9, , ,228 29,201 3, , I A Bung Aakrang ,635 1, , ,7 2 A Ngo Aakrang ,308 1, , ' A Vao Aakrang ,161 1, , ,7 4 Ha3amg San HHaga-ing ,000 12,00 34,700 66,000 19,328 85,328 6, HaeAmg Laup Hoja_Aing ,000 6,000 1,500 35, ,131 9,269 98, ,900 15, ,719 1,181 4,2 Cu6m xai TT.Lao 6 Baio-TTn Long- Hoia Tan Thainh Hi 1, ,446 1, Cau6m xa' rt Tn T Han-Im_ 7 -a6n a?p n Hoa_ 1,680 1, ,780 2, Tan LiAn oiai Quling Nam 18,470 21,310 44, ,38 100, ,000 46, , ,090 11, , A Vaeang Hian 8,100 8,400 6,000 1,980 24,480 62,000 3,000 26,230 91,230 3, j Bhlee Hi&n 5, ,400 1,200 13,000 73,000 4,000 10,260 87,260 3, La Dee Nam Giang 80 3,000 21,000 6, ,000 9,000 42,600 57,600 2, Cha Val Nam Giang 4,80 9,000 12,000 7,200 33,000 72,000 30,000 78, ,000 3, Qu ngngai 21, l , , ,5 2, , , , , ,768 81,311 4, , I Ba Trang Ba Ta 1,126 3,608 13,64, 18,378 7,272 21,810 26,518 55, Page 64 September 2003

103 Rural Energy I - Phase 11 I Affected Land (M 2 ) Permanent Land (Mi 2 ) N Commune District Agricultural Land Forestry Land 0 Residenti ~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~ Foet Resident ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Ag Tot Cinnam Rub Peppe Coffe Fruit Vegeta Rice Other Subtota Manma Wastela Subtota al Land ral Land ry lal Land al on ber r e Trees ble ForOhe ors es nd I Ln Ba Kham Ba Ta = ,758 2,022 40,030 20,472 62, CuOm xat 13nh Tha0nh-B HiM0p - 62,10 4,1 3 B Trung - B3nh SAn 4,050 35, ,650 18,000 12,000 30,000 25,650 2, , B ChmAng B T5n-B H-ajii _ Cuom xai S-n 4 Tan- Sn Tiy ,722 4,734 12,714 42,704 42,704 SAn Tinh _ Cu6m xai 5 SAnDung San Tay 840 9,048 6,552 16,440 25, , ,588 -SAri LtiOp '6 SAn Trung SAn Hai 16, , , I 7 SAn Haii San Hai 4,992 17,616 1,Ob 6,764 7, San Thainh San Hai 23, , ,140 6,192 14, SAn Thuiy San Hai 9,236 23,O8 32,744 2,518 2,518 8, SAn Bao SAn Hai ,670 14,60 30,096 8,370 8, San ThxAung SAn Hai , ,752 1,356 7,122 8,478 1, TT Di Lang San Hai ,69 12,140 12,066 18, ,892 3, Trai Lainh Tral Baong 1, , ,428 26,026 25,868 51, Trai Nham Trai Baong 5,262 8,964 3, ,786 37,422 35,862 73, Trai Kha Trai Baong 1, ,094 10,986 10, Trai Buii Trai Baong 1,008 1,410 2,418 62, ,950 86,106 2, Trai Quan Tral Baong 8,712 7, ,804 36,618 36,618 1, Page 65 September 2003

104 Rural Energy I - Phase 11 Affected Land (m 2 ) Permanent Land (i 2 ) N Commune District Agricultural Land FOreStrY Land 0 Residenti Agricultu Foet Resident Tot Cinnam Rub Peppe Coffe Fruit Vegeta Rice Oher Subtotat Manma Wastela Subtota al Land ral Land Land ial Land al on ber r e Trees ble FOreSt nd I B G Tra; Thou Tra; Baong 2,070 2,484 2,166 6,720 11,683 36,811 48, Lai2759 _a ' 7 84,71 09, , ,3 179,9 9 1, ,307 16,547 B6, , ,933 19,127 5, , 1 la Khaei Ch2 Pah 4,800 14,394 2,100 21,294 3,618 3,618 62, ,2 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~126 2 Pa! Toi AYunPa _ 23,532 2,790 26,322 24,030 24,030 10, la Rbol AYunPa 4,800 7,062 6,000 17,862. 6, A Ma Ran Ma AYUnPa RAn 16, ,57 2, , , , , ,765 2,1 _93 A YunPa 16,88~~~ ~~ ~~~ 5 la Ta Ch2 Prang 6, ,60 5,400 21,00 61,596 48, ~6 - _ I _ BaOu Catin Ch2 Prang 8,783 9,774 6,479 25,036 2,393 2,393 21, _ la Dreng Ch2Sa 6,000 6,348 1,800 5,000 5,000 24,148 19, la Phang Cha Si 2,40 6, , ,196 12, la Hrui Ch2 Sa 8,700 13,88 4,200 14,98 41,768 2, ~~~~,, ~ ~~~~4 4 1 la Le ChaSa 12,00 12,00 9,966 5,310 12,00 51,276 12,630 12,630 24, Kon LAn Kh5ng K'Bang 2,40 9,600 42,198 1,800 4,800 60,798 12, ,0 I 35 2 La KU K'Bang 001 = 2,100 7,026 63,308 4, ,080 3,672 3,672 32,580 1, ,0 3 Kbla K'Bang , ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~94 22, , ,096 2,096 19,900 1,0 1,859, , Ta T n9 K'Ban9 2,613 7, ,419 4,592 25,732 1,894 1,894 25, ,384 2,2 1 S2 ROh KOn Ch'ro 780 2,580 9,560 27, ,546 17,172 7,740 24,912 33, ,5 SiRhKnCho70 258,627, Kon Yang Kon Ch'ro , ,328 1,699 1,345 3,046 6,090 50,500 2,921 2,768 1,620 7,3 6 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~~~~ 09 7 Ch2 Gu Krang Pa 1,860 8,000 6,000 7,200 I 23,060 19, Page 66 September 2003

105 Rural Energy I - Phase 11 Affected Land (M 2 ) Permanent Land (in 2 ) N Commune District Agricultural Land Forestry Land F o Residenti Agricultu Foet Resident Tot Cinnam Rpb Peppe Coffe Fruit Vegeta Manma Wastela Subtota al Land ral Land ry ial Land al on r ber e Trees ble ~Rice Other Iutt Forest de ndiland on ber r n e Trees ble ~~~~~~~ ~ ~~~~~~Forest Chae Drang Krang Pa ,000 3,600 4,314 28,110 12, la Rsai Krang Pa ,670 4,710 1,520 10,403 38,058 14,376 52, la Kanh la Grai 19,087 1, , ,671 3,497 24, ,3 2 Aak Sa Mei Aak Aoa 11,0 8,600 2,000 4,000 1,200 26,800 70,100 70,100 10, _00 I _34 2 laba ,000 4,000 48,000 11, Kon Gang Aak Aoa 16, , ,000 84, , Hra Mang Yang 4,00 4,000 8,000 4,000 8,000 8,120 36,120 4,000 16,800 20,800 15, XaiT rang Ak Aoa 3,000 19,00 20,000 6,000 6,000 54,000 36,400 36,400 15, '78 _0 _ 6 la Pach A4k Aoa ,200 41, ,600 15,600 65, Kon Tum ,00 206,034 41,20 2, , ,340 51,368 6, ,816 53, , Aak Na Aak Ta , ,006 43,644 6,108 49,752 8,256 2 Mang Xang Aak Ta 1,758 7,296 9,054 6,690 6,690 4,050 _ 3 Ngouc Yau AAk Ta 378 3,360 2, ,552 64,098 1,476 65,574 5,868 4 Ngouc Lay Aak Ta 120 1,776 9,10B 1,650 12,654 26,544 12,198 38,742 1,416 5 Pa Ca AAk Ta ,280 44, Aak Mar Aak Hai , , Ch2 Hreng TuX Kon 3,900 3,900 25, A6k Ruaong Kon Plong 79, ,860 2, , ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~14, Pai A Kon Plong 360 7,266 21, ,664 37, ,878 7, , k L k 3,46 78, , ,608 83,98 8,802 1,213,7 188,274 11,820 92, , ,124 16,636 3,893 3, klk 04g 42 September 323 Page 67 September 2003

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